Category: Airbus

The Airbus ‘Whisperjet,’ formerly known as Bombardier’s CSeries, is getting complaints for sounding like an orca mating call

The narrow-body’s twin engines emit what locals have described as a strange howling noise as it comes in to land, enraging people living on the flight path in Zurich

Zurich Airport has received complaints on its noise hotline of unusual sounds when Swiss Air’s A220 jet passes overhead.Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

Swiss Air greeted the arrival of its latest plane with great fanfare, dubbing the Airbus SE A220 model the “Whisperjet” and promising neighbourhoods around Zurich Airport that it would be 50 per cent quieter than older aircraft.

But that tag has come back to haunt the Deutsche Lufthansa AG unit as the narrow-body’s twin engines emit what locals have described as a strange howling noise as it comes in to land, enraging people living on the flight path.

“It’s even louder than other machines flying in,” said Klaus Stoehlker, spokesman for the Zurich-based Foundation Against Aircraft Noise. “They’ve been describing it as temporary while they make assessments, but for nine months now it hasn’t gone away.”

Zurich Airport has received complaints on its noise hotline of unusual sounds when the A220 passes overhead, a spokeswoman said, adding that it’s working with Swiss to seek a quick solution. The plane — developed by Bombardier Inc. and now part of the Airbus lineup — isn’t breaching rules and the sound, which last for a few seconds, hasn’t triggered higher fees that apply to louder jets.

Airbus and Swiss each said they are aware of the situation and in close contact with engine maker Pratt & Whitney, which is analyzing the noise — likened by some to the mating call of an orca whale — to determine its cause. The sound “occasionally occurs” during throttle movements when A220 is at low power, a Pratt spokeswoman said, adding that the jet’s total noise footprint still represents a 75 per cent improvement on older planes.

The issue, which affects A220 models seemingly at random, risks blemishing the plane’s credentials as ideal for noise-limited airports. Hubs including Frankfurt operate strict night curfews, while London City, which Swiss also serves with the plane, restricts weekend flights.

The Whisperjet name has been applied to a variety of planes over the decades, including the BAE-146 and Eastern Airlines Boeing Co. 727s, whose tail-mounted engines made the front of the cabin quiet but the rear especially noisy.

–With assistance from Frederic Tomesco.

Bloomberg.com

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Delta Air Lines takes delivery of its first Airbus A220

Becomes first airline in North America to receive A220Airbus-A220-100-first-take-off

Mirabel, Quebec; October 26, 2018:  Airbus today welcomed Delta Air Lines as the first U.S. carrier to take delivery of the Airbus A220 aircraft.  On hand for the delivery ceremony at the aircraft’s assembly line in Mirabel were members of the A220 team as well as government officials and executives from Delta, Airbus, Bombardier and Investissement Quebec.

“It is with great pride that we take delivery of our first, state-of-the-art A220-100,” said Delta Chief Executive Ed Bastian. “We have big plans for our A220 fleet and are confident that Delta customers and Delta people alike will be delighted with the in-flight experience provided by this thoroughly modern and efficient aircraft. We value our longstanding partnerships with Airbus and Bombardier and are grateful for the great design and manufacturing work done by the team here in Mirabel.”

Delta’s A220 will enter service in early 2019, making Delta the fourth global airline to operate the aircraft previously known as the Bombardier C Series. The C Series Aircraft Limited Partnership (CSALP) welcomed Airbus as lead partner earlier this year, prompting the change of name to the Airbus A220.  Delta is the largest A220-100 customer, with a firm order for 75 aircraft.

Guillaume Faury, President of Airbus’ commercial aircraft business, said, “We at Airbus are dedicated to providing our customers the right products for a marketplace that needs modern, efficient and passenger-friendly aircraft – and the remarkable A220 certainly delivers. When a great airline like Delta puts a new aircraft into service as a platform for their outstanding passenger service, the entire industry takes note. The A220 team is gratified by the confidence that the Delta family has placed in this excellent, Canadian-born aircraft.”

The A220-100 delivers unbeatable fuel efficiency. It brings together state-of-the-art aerodynamics, advanced materials and Pratt & Whitney’s latest-generation PW1500G geared turbofan engines to offer at least 20 percent lower fuel burn per seat compared to previous generation aircraft.

With an order book of over 400 aircraft to date, the A220 has all the credentials to win the lion’s share of the 100- to 150-seat aircraft market, estimated to represent at least 7,000 aircraft over the next 20 years.

Major milestone at Mirabel: Delivery of the first Airbus A220 to a North American airline, Delta Air Lines

MIRABEL, QCOct. 24, 2018 /CNW Telbec/ – The first Airbus A220 aircraft to be delivered to a North American airline will be officially handed over to Delta Air Lines on Friday 26 October in a ceremony at the A220 assembly plant in Mirabel, in the presence of senior leaders representing Delta Air Lines, Airbus, Bombardier, as well as elected officials

Delta Air Lines A220 takes to the skies for its first flight

  • Delta will be first U.S. operator to benefit from new-generation aircraft’s unbeatable efficiency
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Photo: Kurt Hofmann

MIRABEL, QC, Oct. 6, 2018 /CNW Telbec/ – Delta Air Lines’ first A220-100 took off on its first flight from Mirabel airport, Québec, at 2:02 p.m. local time. The aircraft was crewed by A220 programme test pilots. During successful 3-hour flight, the crew checked the aircraft’s main systems and landed back in Mirabel at 4:57 p.m.

The flight took place a few days after the aircraft rolled out of the paint shop. Next, the aircraft will continue with pre-delivery testing and assembly, as elements of its state-of-the-art interior come together at the A220 assembly line. Delta’s first A220 is scheduled to begin service in early 2019.

Delta Air Lines will be the first U.S. airline to operate the A220 – at the same time becoming the fourth A220 operator, after Swiss International Air Lines, airBaltic, and Korean Air. Delta is the largest A220-100 customer, with a firm order for 75 aircraft.

The A220-100 delivers unbeatable fuel efficiency.  It brings together state-of-the-art aerodynamics, advanced materials and Pratt & Whitney’s latest-generation PW1500G geared turbofan engines to offer at least 20 percent lower fuel burn per seat compared to previous generation aircraft.

With an order book of over 400 aircraft to date, the A220 has all the credentials to win the lion’s share of the 100- to 150-seat aircraft market, estimated to represent at least 7,000 aircraft over the next 20 years.

 

MIRABEL, QC, Oct. 6, 2018 /CNW Telbec/ – Delta Air Lines’ first A220-100 took off on its first flight from Mirabel airport, Québec, at 2:02 p.m. local time. The aircraft was crewed by A220 programme test pilots. During successful 3-hour flight, the crew checked the aircraft’s main systems and landed back in Mirabel at 4:57 p.m.

The flight took place a few days after the aircraft rolled out of the paint shop. Next, the aircraft will continue with pre-delivery testing and assembly, as elements of its state-of-the-art interior come together at the A220 assembly line. Delta’s first A220 is scheduled to begin service in early 2019.

Delta Air Lines will be the first U.S. airline to operate the A220 – at the same time becoming the fourth A220 operator, after Swiss International Air Lines, airBaltic, and Korean Air. Delta is the largest A220-100 customer, with a firm order for 75 aircraft.

The A220-100 delivers unbeatable fuel efficiency.  It brings together state-of-the-art aerodynamics, advanced materials and Pratt & Whitney’s latest-generation PW1500G geared turbofan engines to offer at least 20 percent lower fuel burn per seat compared to previous generation aircraft.

With an order book of over 400 aircraft to date, the A220 has all the credentials to win the lion’s share of the 100- to 150-seat aircraft market, estimated to represent at least 7,000 aircraft over the next 20 years.

Delta’s first A220 rolls out of Mirabel hangar

14 September 2018 | Airbus

Delta Air Lines` first Airbus A220-100 was introduced this week after rolling out of the painting hangar at the A220 final assembly line in Mirabel, Québec. Delta will be the first U.S. airline to take delivery of the A220, featuring a state-of-the art interior and delivering best-in-class fuel performance.

Now that the aircraft is decked out in Delta’s livery, it will move to pre flight activities in the A220 flight line hangar in Mirabel before taking off for its first flight later this fall.

Delta’s first A220 is scheduled to begin service in early 2019.

Airbus-Canada partnership can build a bright future off a storied past

Contributed to The Globe and Mail | 6 September 2018 |  OPINION: Tom Enders

Tom Enders is CEO of Airbus

Canada has a great history of innovation in aerospace – and this country looks set to continue building on that legacy. Airbus aims to be a key partner in Canada’s successful aviation future.

We can do that vital work together because both Airbus and Canada believe in global trade, international co-operation and environmental excellence.

Canadians brought the world one of the first passenger jet airliners ever to fly (the Avro C102 Jetliner in 1949, from which the word “jetliner” entered our vocabulary); launched one of the earliest satellites sent into space (Alouette 1 in 1962); and revolutionized air transportation in smaller cities (with the Canadair Regional Jet). So, there is no doubt – Canada’s history and expertise in aerospace run deep.

Joining that proud list is the truly innovative aircraft developed by Bombardier in Quebec as the C Series – now a new and vital part of the Airbus family as the A220-100 and A220-300. These remarkable aircraft, specifically designed for the 130- to 160-seat market, deliver lower fuel burn, half the noise footprint and decreased emissions – making them true community-minded jetliners.

The market for smaller single-aisle jets is projected to be about 7,000 over the next 20 years, and the A220 has all the credentials it needs to take the lion’s share of that. This is why Airbus has already made and will continue to make considerable investments in this vital, Canada-led program.

Canada has everything necessary to continue to develop its aerospace industry as an engine for future economic growth: a rich pool of existing talent and experience, a dynamic education system that continues to feed that talent pool, a strong supplier network to support all aspects of the industry and a research ecosystem that fuels innovation.

As Al Power of aerospace manufacturer Precision Castparts Corp. put it in a Globe and Mail article last month, there are strong arguments for Canada to look more toward aerospace for economic growth than other more uncertain industries. We see that happening – most recently in this month’s announcement of support by the Quebec and federal governments to Montreal-based CAE, another great Canadian enterprise, to harness new technologies to develop the next generation of aerospace simulation and training products.

Airbus, like CAE, is committed to Canada’s leading role in the aerospace industry of tomorrow – one that is and will remain (despite current nationalistic pressures) a truly global business. Even before the A220 partnership, Airbus – with its more than 1,000 employees and 35-year history in Canada, including our Fort Erie, Ont., helicopter manufacturing facility – was working and spending billions of dollars with more than 600 Canadian suppliers in nine provinces.

Look for this to increase, with the 12,500 direct and indirect jobs supported by the A220 partnership. We also see strong growth potential for our helicopter business as well as space and defence, the latter highlighted by our most recent contract to supply new fixed-wing search-and-rescue aircraft to the Canadian Armed Forces.

This growth in Canada is one reason why the annual Airbus global supplier conference will take place in Montreal this fall. It is an opportunity to showcase the aviation ecosystem that already exists in this country – and to help create new partnerships and opportunities for Canadian ingenuity on a global scale.

Aviation and aerospace are crucial growth and prosperity drivers for the future. Airbus and Canada, by continuing to work and innovate together, will make it fly.

A220 starts contributing to Airbus delivery figures

06 AUGUST, 2018 SOURCE: FLIGHT DASHBOARD BY: DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW

Airbus has included the A220 in its monthly order backlog and delivery figures for the first time since acquiring the former Bombardier CSeries programme at the beginning of July.

The airframer puts total orders for the A220 at 402 aircraft, comprising 279 A220-300s and 123 of the smaller -100. All were logged before the acquisition.

Thirty-nine aircraft, including 31 A220-300s and eight -100s, have been delivered – among them two -300s since Airbus took over.

These two aircraft were transferred respectively to Korean Air on 9 July and Air Baltic on 19 July.

They helped to take Airbus single-aisle deliveries to 304 aircraft since the beginning of the year, and total aircraft deliveries to 380.

Its 76 long-haul deliveries comprised 46 A350s, 23 A330s and seven A380s.

Airbus managed to hand over 77 aircraft during the single month of July, including the two A220s.

Bombardier says C Series shift to Airbus allows it to focus on regional planes

by ROSS MAROWITS, THE CANADIAN PRESS

With its focus no longer diverted by the aircraft formerly known as the C Series, Bombardier Inc. says it is working to improve the profitability of its regional jets and turboprops by boosting sales and cutting costs.

The Montreal-based transportation giant’s regional aircraft order backlog rose to 116 planes, enough for three years of production that sets it up for the potential to increase production rates. Its commercial aircraft segment won orders for a total of 16 Q400 aircraft and 35 CRJ Series equipped with its new cabin design.

“Adding a little bit of volume here also is very beneficial to those programs as you add units especially at the current rates — that does improve the cost structure,” chief financial officer John Di Bert said Thursday during a conference call about its second-quarter results.

“It’s about continuing to focus on adding volume, it’s about leaning out the cost structure and make sure we have very efficient programs, really focusing on that aftermarket and then we’ll take it from there,” said Di Bert.

Bombardier’s shares increased nearly five per cent at $4.99 in Thursday trading after the company posted strong results and signalled that its turnaround plan remains on track.

“Our solid performance positions us to achieve our free cash flow break even target for this year and more importantly to sustain cash generation well into the future,” Di Bert added.

Bombardier, which reports in U.S. dollars, said overall revenues increased three per cent to $4.26 billion in the second quarter.

Most of the improvement was due to an 11 per cent increase in revenue at Bombardier Transportation, which accounted for $2.26 billion of the total. Revenue fell at Bombardier’s commercial aircraft and business aircraft divisions.

The company achieved a second-quarter profit of $70 million as it posted a $232 million increase free cash flow, helped by $600 million net proceeds from the sale of Downsview airport in Toronto.

Continue reading “Bombardier says C Series shift to Airbus allows it to focus on regional planes”