Boeing, CAE sign MOU to enhance global aerospace training, innovation and fleet support

Farnborough, July 19, 2022 – Boeing [NYSE: BA] and CAE [NYSE: CAE; TSX: CAE]

CAE today signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to expand their collaboration and explore further teaming opportunities in defense aerospace training. The memorandum leverages the strengths, skills, and advanced technologies of Boeing and CAE with the intent to further enhance innovation and competition through potential joint-offerings.

Additionally, the MOU aims to advance mission readiness for defense customers worldwide operating Boeing military aircraft. Working together, Boeing and CAE are uniquely qualified to deliver outcome-based pilot training, aircrew ground school, in-service support, and instructor training at the point of need.

“Boeing and CAE share an unwavering commitment to deliver value through innovative training solutions that provide increased efficacy and reliability to our defense and commercial services customers,” said Stephanie Pope, president and CEO, Boeing Global Services. “This collaboration demonstrates the best of how governments and industry can collaborate to benefit customers worldwide.”

This collaboration amplifies a long-standing relationship spanning commercial and defense portfolios across the globe. CAE is an integral partner on the CH-47 Chinook program in Germany, has supported Boeing extensively with P-8 training solutions worldwide, and is a charter member of Team Poseidon in Boeing’s Canadian Multi-Mission Aircraft offering. This MOU builds on the recent exclusive teaming agreement in Germany for Chinook, and continues our joint efforts to deliver enhanced training offerings for Chinook in the United Arab Emirates that support Emiratization efforts, as well as expanding P-8 solutions in Canada, Germany, and Norway.

“Our purpose is to prepare our military customers for safe and successful mission outcomes through advanced training and mission readiness,” says Daniel Gelston, president, CAE Defense & Security. “CAE and Boeing are leveraging our global training experience and aircraft expertise to expand solutions that support modernization and adaptability for the future of these platforms.”

The MOU expands Boeing and CAE international teaming and supplier networks to provide solutions that support both customer and regional development.

About Boeing

As a leading global aerospace company, Boeing develops, manufactures and services commercial airplanes, defense products and space systems for customers in more than 150 countries. As a top U.S. exporter, the company leverages the talents of a global supplier base to advance economic opportunity, sustainability and community impact. Boeing’s diverse team is committed to innovating for the future and living the company’s core values of safety, quality and integrity. Learn more at www.boeing.com.

About CAE

CAE Defense & Security is at the leading edge of digital innovation providing training and mission support solutions across multi-domain operations – air, land, maritime, space and cyber.  Our training and operational support solutions prepare customers who operate in complex, high-stakes environments where mission readiness and successful outcomes are critical.  CAE is the world’s leading pure play, platform agnostic training and simulation company serving the global defense market. Learn more at www.cae.com.

At CAE, we equip people in critical roles with the expertise and solutions to create a safer world. As a technology company, we digitalize the physical world, deploying simulation training and critical operations support solutions. Above all else, we empower pilots, airlines, defence and security forces, and healthcare practitioners to perform at their best every day and when the stakes are the highest. Around the globe, we’re everywhere customers need us to be with more than 13,000 employees in more than 200 sites and training locations in over 40 countries. CAE represents 75 years of industry firsts—the highest-fidelity flight and mission simulators, surgical manikins, and personalized training programs powered by artificial intelligence. We’re investing our time and resources into building the next generation of cutting-edge, digitally immersive training and critical operations solutions while keeping positive environmental, social and governance (ESG) impact at the core of our mission. Today and tomorrow, we’ll make sure our customers are ready for the moments that matter.

Air Canada reportedly in talks to add Airbus A321s as COVID subsides

From BNN Bloomberg News 🔗 link to source story

Charlotte Ryan, Siddharth Philip and Layan Odeh, Bloomberg News | 23 February 2022

Air Canada is in talks with Airbus SE about adding longer-distance A321neo jets alongside its fleet of Boeing Co. 737 narrowbodies as travel demand rebounds, people with knowledge of the matter said.

The carrier is looking at ordering 10 to 20 aircraft, one of the people said. The negotiations are preliminary and may not lead to a deal, according to the people, who asked not to be named discussing matters that aren’t public.

While Air Canada was an established operator of Airbus’s original A320 family, it chose the Boeing Max in the contest between new-generation planes. Adding a small fleet of A321neos would bring a further boost for an Airbus model that can carry 220 people in two classes over longer distances than the rival Max 10.

Air Canada is also talking with jet lessors about sourcing the A321s, one of the people said.

An Airbus spokeswoman declined to comment on any discussions the company may have with customers. 

Air Canada referenced a Feb. 18 conference call, when Chief Executive Officer Michael Rousseau discussed fleet renewal initiatives as the airline emerges from the pandemic. Last May, the CEO said that Airbus A321LR, or long range, models “potentially have a place in the Air Canada fleet as we go forward.”
 

AIRLINE PIVOTS

Other airlines have also returned to growth mode, looking ahead to fielding newer, less-polluting planes in the post-pandemic era as the drag on demand caused by the coronavirus starts to lift.

Qatar Airways, JetBlue Airways Corp. and Allegiant Travel Co. are among carriers making fresh narrow-body commitments since the start of the year. 

IAG SA, the parent of British Airways, is in advanced talks on a mixed order for dozens of single-aisle jets, including up to 50 Boeing Co. 737 Max and Airbus A320s also being discussed, Reuters reported earlier, citing industry sources. 

The order would be a step down from the 200-plane Max commitment to announced with fanfare at the Paris air show in 2019, yet it would still mark a victory for Boeing after IAG reopened the contest last year. IAG currently operates Airbus narrow-bodies.
 

AIR CANADA PLANS

Air Canada, which said Tuesday it will relaunch 34 international routes, announced last week that it had reinstated a commitment for 12 Airbus A220s, a smaller jet originally designed and built by Canada’s Bombardier Inc. 

The deliveries were canceled in 2020 after the virus stifled demand and Air Canada struggled to secure pandemic aid from the government. The carrier also scaled back its Boeing Max deal by a third to 40, and deferred some of those handovers. 

In November, Air Canada changed course, accelerating Max deliveries and reversing two of the A220 cancellations to restore its network.

As it stands, the fleet comprises around 170 aircraft, including older A320s and a Boeing-dominated wide-body lineup.

The A321, prized by airlines for its combination of capacity and range, is in short supply with yearslong production backlogs. Airbus’s cancellation of a Qatar Airways order amid a contract dispute could free up some capacity, though a London judge has ordered the manufacturer to hold the slots for now.

New Year Prospects: Air Canada’s Fleet In 2022

From Simple Flying – link to source story

by Chris Loh | January 1, 2022

Continuing its slow recovery from the worst of the global health crisis, major Canadian airline Air Canada the growth of its fleet in 2021. Notably, this consisted of the addition of a number of Airbus A220-300s as well as several Boeing 737 MAX 8s. Let’s take a glance at where Air Canada’s fleet stands at the start of 2022.

B737_Max_8_Water-1538
It appears that Air Canada took delivery of seven Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft during the 2nd half of 2021. Photo: Air Canada

Air Canada’s fleet composition at a glance

According to data from Planespotters.net, Air Canada has the following aircraft in its fleet. The quantities are noted alongside the type, with the change from last year’s report (published June 2021) in parentheses.

Aircraft from Airbus*:
  • A220-300: 27 (+5)
  • A320-200: 17 (-1)
  • A321-200: 15 (no change)
  • A330-300: 16 (no change)

*We should note that the airline ordered the A220 when it was still known as the Bombardier CSeries.

Aircraft from Boeing:
  • 737 MAX 8: 31 (+7)
  • 767-300BCF*: 3 (+3)
  • 777-200LR: 6 (no change)
  • 777-300ER: 18 (-1)
  • 787-8: 8 (no change)
  • 787-9: 29 (no change)

*One Air Canada 767-300 has completed its conversion from passenger to freighter. The remaining two are in the process of being converted.

B777-300ER-4
It appears that one Boeing 777-300ER left the fleet. Photo: Air Canada

Growing the short and medium-haul fleet

As you can see from the changes since our last Air Canada fleet report, the carrier has gained five Airbus A220-300s and seven Boeing 737 MAX 8s.

As noted previously, there was a little bit of a back-and-forth when the carrier announced it would be canceling some of its orders in November of 2020, which would have seen orders for 12 A220s and 10 737 MAX 8s axed. However, one condition of the Canadian government’s rescue package was that it would proceed with its planned orders for both aircraft types. As a result, the airline has nine 737 MAX 8s and 18 A220-300s still on the way.

A220-300-2
The airline continues to grow its A220 and 737 numbers. Photo: Air Canada

Going big on cargo operations

One surprising standout number from our list was the “addition” of three Boeing 767-300s from last year. This change is, again, a bit of a back and forth. During the worst of the crisis, Air Canada had decided to retire its 767s.

However, cargo demand has been soaring amid increased eCommerce activity, decreased transportation capacity, and global supply chain snarls. These factors led the airline to convert its passenger 767s into full freighters, complete with a large door to handle containers on the main deck. Work was, and continues to be, done at IAI facilities in Tel Aviv.

It’s not just 767s and the bellies of passenger aircraft being used for cargo operations. At the time of this article’s publication, the carrier has four of its 16 A330-300s and seven of its 18 Boeing 777-300ERs operating as “preighters” (passenger freighters). These are passenger aircraft which have had their seats removed in order to accommodate freight. Making use of the fleet’s younger jets for reasons unknown, the airline was able to provide additional cargo capacity to Canada’s west coast, which had its main road and rail supply lines cut off from the rest of the country in November, due to extreme and extensive flooding.

Cargojet order launches Mammoth 777-200LR freighter programme

From Flight Global – link to source story

By David Kaminski-Morrow | 17 November 2021

Canadian carrier Cargojet Airways has emerged as the launch customer for the Boeing 777-200LR freighter conversion initiated by US-based Mammoth Freighters.

Cargojet is to take a pair of the converted twinjets, and will hold options on another pair – as well as options for two conversions of the larger 777-300ER.

The first aircraft to be delivered to Cargojet will be a modified 777-200LR with serial number 29742, originally delivered to Delta Air Lines in 2009.

Mammoth says the twinjet, fitted with General Electric GE90 engines, will enter the conversion process in mid-2022 and be delivered in the second half of 2023.

The company unveiled its conversion programme for the two 777 models in September, noting it had acquired access to a feedstock of Delta 777-200LRs.

Mammoth 777-200LR freighter-c-Mammoth Freighters
Source: Mammoth Freighters

Mammoth has access to ex-Delta 777-200LR feedstock for its initial freighters

Mammoth’s freighter conversions will carry the -200LRMF and -300ERMF designations.

Cargojet’s agreement will enable Mammoth to “demonstrate the significance” of its product, says Mammoth co-chief Bill Tarpley.

“This is the next generation of converted freighters that have improved on-wing performance while using less fuel and emitting less carbon than the current ageing widebody fleet.”

Cargojet, which operates from Hamilton airport near Toronto, has a fleet of over 30 freighters, mainly based on Boeing 767-200, -300 and 757-200 platforms.

It had stated earlier this year that it intended to acquire 777 freighters but, at the time, had not signalled whether they would be new-build or converted aircraft.

Cargojet said it would use the 777s on long-haul Asian routes, integrating them with the airline’s domestic network.

CAE deploys first Boeing 737 MAX full-flight simulator in Europe; Signs training deal with SAS

From Asian Aviation – link to source story

By Asian Aviation Staff – 3 November 2021

(PHOTO: CAE)

CAE announced has announced the expansion of its pilot training capacity in Europe through the deployment of a brand new CAE 7000XR Series Boeing 737 MAX full-flight simulator (FFS) at the CAE Amsterdam training centre.

“CAE provides the most innovative full-flight simulators (FFS) to improve training efficiency, offer advanced capabilities, and increase operational efficiency for airlines,” said Nick Leontidis, CAE Group president, Civil Aviation Training Solutions. “We are excited to expand our training footprint in Europe with this latest addition of our Boeing 737 MAX FFS. CAE is leading the industry with innovative training solutions and operational support to all of its customers across the globe”.

CAE has received close to 60 orders for Boeing 737 MAX full-flight simulators and has already  delivered more than 35 B737 FFSs of these orders for various customers around the world. CAE has six B737 Max FFSs installed at the company’s training centers located in Toronto, Dallas, Amsterdam, Dubai and Singapore. The CAE 7000XR Series FFS is the latest evolution of CAE’s industry benchmark FFS. Designed in collaboration with our customers, the CAE 7000XR Series sets a new standard in level D FFS. Leveraging the latest advancements in technology and training capabilities, the CAE 7000XR Series is designed to optimise life-cycle costs for our customers and to address new and future training requirements. Enhanced features include CAE Tropos 6000XR for extreme visual realism, next-generation instructor office, upset prevention recovery training, and built for lower ownership costs and increased reliability.

CAE signs long-term training deal with SAS for Airbus A350 pilots
CAE and Scandinavian carrier SAS, announced the signing of an exclusive Airbus A350 pilot training agreement until 2032. CAE already provides Airbus A320, A330 and Boeing 737 full-flight simulator (FFS) training to the airline’s pilots. CAE has been providing training solutions services, initial and recurrent pilot training, and cabin crew training to SAS for more than 10 years. Pilot training for Airbus A350 aircraft is a key part of SAS’s growth and fleet modernisation as the airline continues to open up new destinations and more frequent flights. In support of this agreement, CAE deployed an Airbus A320 FFS to its CAE Oslo training centre in 2021 and will deploy another Airbus A350 FFS to its CAE Copenhagen training centre in the beginning of 2022.

OWG’s 1st anniversary: First Boeing 737-800 for OWG

MIRABEL, QC, Aug. 5, 2021 /CNW Telbec/ – A year after its arrival in the Quebec aviation market, OWG, the newest division of Nolinor Aviation, is getting ready to bounce back from the pandemic by adding its first Boeing 737-800 to its fleet. On the eve of a return to “normalcy“, this acquisition will provide a positive flying experience to more travelers allowing them to fly longer distances and support the creation of more than 20 specialized jobs.

First Boeing 737-800 for OWG (CNW Group/OWG)

“Our team spent the past year planning this moment and we look forward to flying again when it will be safe to do so. With this new 737-800 aircraft, OWG will offer the HIGH LOVE experience towards more destinations. It is the next logical step for us”, declared Mr. Marco Prud’Homme, President of Nolinor Aviation.

For OWG, adding this type of aircraft represents an opportunity to offer destinations further away than what is currently possible. It also demonstrates the company’s commitment to continued growth. The new destinations offered by OWG will be announced in the coming weeks. As for the Boeing 737-800 that was acquired, it was purchase from a special purpose corporation wholly-owned by Frank DeMarinis and is expected to be in service in 2022, once its cabin has been modified to OWG’s image and standards.

“OWG will continue to reinvent the travel experience by ensuring that we always have the interests and needs of our travelers at heart,” concluded Mr. Prud’Homme,

About the Boeing 737-800 :

  • Passengers on board: 189
  • Distance: 5765 km
  • Maximum cruise speed: 946 km/h
  • Optimum cruise speed: 842 km/h

About OWG

OWG is the newest division of Nolinor Aviation. The airline was launched in 2020 and offers scheduled flights to selected Caribbean destinations with a fleet of three 156-passenger Boeing 737-400s and one 189-passenger Boeing 737-800. Additional destinations will be offered in a near future. For more information, visit owg.com.

In Photos: Air Canada Gets Olympic Ready With A Special Livery

From Simple Flying – link to source story

by Tom Boon | June 30, 2021

Air Canada is launching a new special livery just in time for the delayed 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The new livery is plastered on one of the airline’s Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft. The aircraft is set to enter general circulation with Air Canada before being placed on the airline’s Tokyo Narita route during the Olympic Games.

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
Air Canada is getting into the Olympic spirit. Photo: Air Canada

Once every four years, or occasionally five years when there’s a pandemic, the Olympic Games are hosted. Typically this means a mammoth logistical challenge, getting teams, fans, and even flames worldwide. Air is usually the most practical option, with airlines willing to lend a hand.

Air Canada’s Olympic livery

Many airlines get involved in the festivities with special aircraft liveries. There are a few special liveries to share, but first, we’ll take a look at why we’re here. Air Canada has applied an Olympic-themed livery to C-FVLQ, a three-and-a-half-year-old Boeing 787-9.

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
The livery is in English and French. Photo: Air Canada

The livery is relatively simple but gets the job done. On the aircraft’s port side, “Fly The Flag” is written in big black and gold lettering. Meanwhile, on the other side of the aircraft, the same lettering reads “Haut Le Drapeau”, the French expression with the same meaning. On both sides, it also says “Go Canada Go!” in all gold lettering.

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
Air Canada says Go Canada Go! Photo: Air Canada

According to the fleet number listed on the side of the aircraft, the livery has been applied to C-FVLQ. This is a 3.54-year-old Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, according to ch-aviation.com. It completed its first flight on December 18th, 2017, before being delivered to Air Canada on January 12th.

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
The aircraft will fly to Tokyo’s Narita Airport during the Olympic Games. Photo: Air Canada

As of February 28th, the aircraft had completed 14,884 flight hours across 1,812 flight cycles. It arrived in Toronto to get its paint job on Sunday before operating its first flight in the new livery to Vancouver today.

Other Olympic Liveries

The Olympic livery from Air Canada is by no means the only one that has ever been launched. There are typically two reasons that airlines may choose to apply an Olympic livery, and both can be explained using British Airways. When London was the host city of the 2012 games, the airline decked out an Airbus A319, G-EUPC in a special livery to carry the Olympic Flame to the UK. 

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
The Firefly livery carried the Olympic Flame to the UK in 2012. Photo: British Airways

As was seen with Air Canada’s livery, airlines also create special liveries to carry their teams to and from the games. For example, after the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro, British Airways put a gold nose on the Boeing 747 bringing the team home, representing the 27 gold medals won by the team, putting it in second place overall behind the United States with 46 golds.

Air Canada, Olympic Livery, Boeing 787
A golden nose brought the UK team back from the 2016 Olympic Games. Photo: British Airways

Air Canada’s Fleet In 2021

From Simple Flying – link to source story

As Canada’s largest airline, Air Canada has a diverse fleet based across its four hub airports. The network airline has a mix of both widebody and narrowbody aircraft coming from both Airbus and Boeing. The carrier has gone through some changes in the past few years, with more significant upheaval taking place during the global health crisis. Let’s take a look at Air Canada’s fleet as it stands in 2021.

The Boeing 787 is Air Canada’s flagship aircraft. Photo: Air Canada

Air Canada’s fleet composition

According to data from Planespotters.net, Air Canada has the following aircraft in its fleet. The quantities are noted in parentheses.

Aircraft from Airbus*:
  • A220-300 (22)
  • A320 (18)
  • A321 (15)
  • A330-300 (16)

*We should note that the airline ordered the A220 when it was still known as the Bombardier CSeries.

Aircraft from Boeing:
  • 737 MAX 8 (24)
  • 777-200LR (6)
  • 777-300ER (19)
  • 787-8 (8)
  • 787-9 (29)
The average age of Air Canada’s A330-300s is 16 years. Photo: Air Canada

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Outside of regular passenger service

There are aircraft within the Air Canada fleet that are outside of the airline’s passenger operations.

Notably, we have the airline’s private/charter subbrand, Air Canada Jetz. This sub-group consists of four Airbus A319s. This fleet traditionally consisted of three A319s, but it appears a fourth was added in December 2020.

Used to transport touring musicians, sports teams, or private groups, these aircraft have an all-business configuration of 58 seats. With the exception of a short pandemic run, these aircraft tend to stay out of Air Canada’s regular passenger operations.

The Jetz jets flew an all-business-class service during the Winter of 2020 but are typically reserved for special charter operations. Photo: Ken Fielding via Wikimedia Commons 

As we will mention further in this article, Air Canada retired its 767s at the start of the health crisis. However, some of these are slated for a full conversion to freighters. The airline says that two freighters are expected to be in service in time for this year’s fourth-quarter peak airfreight season.

With seven 767s on the list for conversion, it looks like the remaining five will be converted next year, in 2022. This was confirmed by the carrier’s current Chief Financial Officer and future Chief Executive during the earnings call in which Simple Flying attended:

“We’d love to have all seven up and operating by the end of next year. These are typically little bit of a longer process and slots are not really available, but we are certainly working on having all seven up and running by Q4 of next year.” – Michael Rousseau, Chief Executive Officer, Air Canada

Coming and going

On the outgoing side of things, it was in May 2020 that Air Canada announced the early retirement of 79 aircraft. 

Retirements included five 767-300ERs, 16 A319s, and 14 E190s in the mainline fleet. Another 25 767-300ERs and 22 A319s that made up Air Canada Rouge were also retired.

Air Canada took delivery of its first A220 back in January 2020. Photo: Air Canada

Looking at future aircraft, Air Canada has a decent number of Boeing 737 MAX 8s and Airbus A220-300s yet to be delivered. There was a little bit of a back-and-forth when the carrier announced it would be canceling some of its orders last November. The plan would have seen the airline cancel orders for 12 A220s and 10 737 MAX 8s.

However, one condition of the carrier’s government rescue package was that it would proceed with its planned orders for both aircraft types. As it stands, 16 737 MAX 8s and 23 A220-300s are still on the way.

As you can see from the list of aircraft, Air Canada has a fairly diverse fleet- which is quite typical of a large network carrier that operates both short-haul and intercontinental service.

Flair Airlines Begins Service with the First of 13 New Boeing 737-8 Aircraft

The growing ULCC starts passenger service with inaugural flight from Edmonton to Toronto

EDMONTON, Alberta, June 10, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Flair Airlines, Canada’s only independent ultra low-cost carrier (ULCC), begins service today with the first of 13 new Boeing 737-8 aircraft joining the fleet as the airline begins rapid growth to provide affordable, low fare air travel to 19 Canadian destinations.

“Today marks a huge milestone as Flair grows to bring affordable travel options to more Canadians,” says Stephen Jones, President and CEO, Flair Airlines. “Canadians have been paying too much for too long, and Flair is changing that thanks to the addition of the new 737-8 aircraft which provide us the efficiencies and ability to scale our service. Today’s inaugural flight kicks off our rapid growth.”

The inaugural flight of Flair’s first new 737-8 will depart Edmonton at 5:30pm MT and arrive in Toronto at 11:20 pm ET. Piloting the inaugural flight will be two veteran leaders at Flair: Captain Matt Kunz, Vice President, Business Transformation and Operations, and Captain Harold Knop, Regulatory Compliance and Certification Manager.

The new aircraft allow Flair to achieve the lowest cost per seat mile of any Canadian airline. The aircraft will deliver fuel savings and cut the airline’s CO2 emissions by 14%. Lower per passenger emissions are a vital step in lowering Flair’s carbon footprint as it works to become Canada’s greenest and most sustainable airline.

Flair’s pilots, maintenance professionals, flight attendants and safety officers have been conducting extensive testing and training programs to prepare for the addition of the new aircraft. Flair’s team has been working closely with Boeing and been on-site throughout the testing and delivery phase of each aircraft.

Flair began taking delivery of the 13 new aircraft in May. The 737-8 aircraft are joining Flair’s existing fleet of 737-800 aircraft and deliveries continue throughout 2021. By the middle of next year, Flair will have a fleet of 16 aircraft and be well on the way to achieving its “F50” ambition of growing to 50 planes within five years.

About Flair Airlines

Flair Airlines is Canada’s only independent Ultra Low-Cost Carrier (ULCC) and is on a mission to liberate the lives of Canadians by providing affordable air travel that connects them to the people and experiences they love. With an expanding fleet of Boeing 737 aircraft, Flair is growing to serve 19 cities across Canada. For more information, please visit www.flyflair.com