Category: Transport Canada

A220 operators told to limit engine thrust at high altitude

News provided by FlightGlobal.com – link to full story and updates

28 OCTOBER, 2019, SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM, BY: DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROW, LONDON

Operators of Airbus A220s are facing operational limitations of the twinjet’s engines, following several serious incidents involving powerplant failure.

Transport Canada has issued an emergency directive covering both the A220-100 and A220-300 models, which are exclusively fitted with Pratt & Whitney PW1500G engines.

Swiss has suffered three recent engine failures on A220-300s during an early stage of flight.AdvertisementYou can close Ad in 2 s

Preliminary indications indicate that operation of engines with certain thrust ratings at high thrust settings during high-altitude climbs “may be a contributor” to the events, says Transport Canada.

But it adds that investigation is continuing to determine the root cause.

The directive, which warns of a risk of uncontained engine failure and damage to the aircraft, orders operators to limit the engine power to 94% of N1 while above 29,000ft.

Any exceedance lasting more than 20s must be reported, it adds.

Pilots are also being instructed to disengage the autothrottle before initiating step climbs while above 29,000ft. This is to “respect” the N1 limitation, the directive states.

The autothrottle can be engaged as required once the aircraft is stabilised in the cruise but engine power must be monitored to ensure it does not rise above the 94% N1 threshold.

Transport Canada says the directive, an interim measure, applies to A220s equipped with PW1524G, PW1524G-3 or PW1521G-3 engines. Operators must comply within seven days, it adds.

Reuters Exclusive: Regulators weigh ‘startle factors’ for Boeing 737 MAX pilot training – Transport Canada executive

News provided by Reuters – link to full story

MONTREAL/CHICAGO (Reuters) – Global regulators are looking at “startle factors” that can overwhelm pilots as they consider revised protocols for the Boeing 737 MAX, Nicholas Robinson, the head of civil aviation for Transport Canada, told Reuters on Friday.

FILE PHOTO: A worker walks past unpainted Boeing 737 MAX aircraft seen parked in an aerial photo at Renton Municipal Airport near the Boeing Renton facility in Renton, Washington, U.S. July 1, 2019. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson/File Photo

Boeing Co’s fastest-selling jetliner, the 737 MAX, was grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes that killed a total of 346 people within five months.

Pilot overload appears to have played a role in both crashes, in which crews struggled to regain control of the airplane while a new flight control system repeatedly pushed the nose down amid a series of other audio and sensory alarms and alerts.

“What we need to do is ensure that the aircrew in the MAX are able to handle that environment,” Robinson said in an interview with Reuters.

Transport Canada is among a core group of regulators that is evaluating the requirements for the 737 MAX to fly again after a seven-month grounding.

It has been convening weekly by phone, video conferences or face-to-face with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and its counterparts in the European Union and Brazil, Robinson said.

Their decisions could lead to sweeping changes to pilot flight operating manuals and classroom instruction and even mandates for costly simulator training, industry sources have said.

However, no training decisions can be made until Boeing submits software updates to the FAA for review and approval, Robinson said.

Transport Canada is closely aligned with the European Union Aviation Safety Agency on return to service demands and has also raised questions over the architecture behind the 737 MAX’s angle of attack system.

“We continue to look for a solution proposed by the manufacturer and the FAA on that area,” he said.

Still, Canada’s goal is for the MAX to return in countries across the globe simultaneously, or at least in close succession.

“It’s not a necessity, but it’s a goal,” Robinson said.

PILOT WORKLOAD

A startle or surprise in the cockpit can endanger a pilot’s ability to maintain control of the aircraft and was said to play a role in earlier air crashes like Air France flight 447 in 2009.

The same year, Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger safely landed a US Airways flight on the Hudson River in New York after a bird strike disabled the engines. He told lawmakers in June that the 737 MAX crew could have been confused as they struggled to maintain control of the aircraft.

“I can tell you firsthand that the startle factor is real and it’s huge. It absolutely interferes with one’s ability to quickly analyze the crisis and take corrective action,” Sullenberger said.

Under new simulator scenarios, 737 MAX pilots worldwide may be trained on runaway stabilizer, a loss of control that was triggered in both 737 MAX crashes, coupled with some kind of unexpected malfunction.

“The only way to effectively deal with the physical and mental reactions of ‘startle effect’ is to have previously been exposed to it,” said Captain Larry Rooney, president of the Coalition of Airline Pilots Associations.

The goal of introducing startles is to teach pilots how to respond to “fight, flight or freeze” instincts in an environment where the effects are not life threatening, said Rooney. The only way to train for startle is in a simulator or in real life.

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg on Wednesday acknowledged that Boeing’s flight control software, activated off faulty data from a key airflow sensor, contributed to a broader chain of events that created more workload for the pilots in 737 MAX crashes.

The planemaker, which is targeting a 737 MAX return to service in the fourth quarter, has started showing pilots and regulators its proposed software update and training program at information sessions in Miami, London, Istanbul, Shanghai and Singapore scheduled to run through mid-October.

Reporting by Allison Lampert in Montreal and Tracy Rucinski in Chicago; Additional reporting by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle; Editing by Matthew Lewis

WestJet cancels 10 Sask. flights to sunny locations after Max 8 grounding continues

News provided by CBC News – link to full story and updates

Flights to Phoenix, Cancun, Puerto Vallarta affected, not known when flights will return to normal

CBC News · Posted: Sep 10, 2019

A Boeing 737 Max 8 in Westjet’s hangar in Calgary. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Saskatchewan travellers looking to fly south for the winter this year might be in for a bumpy ride.

This week, WestJet announced flight cancellations from airports in Regina and Saskatoon. 

The company blamed the disruptions on Boeing’s 737 Max 8 jets. The planes were pulled from service by Transport Canada after 346 people were killed in crashes involving Indonesia’s Lion Air in 2018 and Ethiopian Airlines in March of this year. Both incidents involved the Max 8.

“Guests who hold a current reservation impacted by this update will be notified proactively if there are changes to their itinerary,” wrote WestJet spokesperson Morgan Bell. “Where possible, we will work to substitute other aircraft directly onto a route and will not impact a guests itinerary so notifications will not be necessary.”

The following flights will be affected:

  • Saskatoon-Phoenix: Three weekly flights suspended.
  • Regina-Orlando: One weekly flight suspended.
  • Regina-Phoenix: Three weekly flights suspended.
  • Regina-Cancun: suspended one weekly flight in November. WestJet will operate one weekly flight in December.
  • Regina–Puerto Vallarta: One weekly flight suspended. WestJet will continue to operate once weekly in November. Two weekly flights will be suspended in December.

Air Canada and Sunwing had already announced plans to pull all Max 8s from its schedule until next year.

WestJet said the suspensions are temporary and that flights will resume once the Max 8 is cleared to return to service. However, that won’t happen until January 5, at the earliest. 

Transport Canada hasn’t said when the ban will be lifted.

Boeing says a system designed to help keep the Max 8 stable seemed to be a factor in each crash.

Many other governing bodies, including China, the United States and the European aviation authority, have banned the planes from their airspace.

WestJet currently owns 13 Max 8 jets, accounting for 10 per cent of its fleet.

Many other flights from Calgary, Winnipeg and Toronto have also been affected.

With files from Ian Hanomansing

Government of Canada invests in pilot training at the First Nations Technical Institute

Provided by Transport Canada/CNW

OTTAWA, Sept. 6, 2019 /CNW/ – Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, on behalf of the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for FedDev Ontario, announced a Government of Canada investment of up to $4.9 million over three years for the First Nations Technical Institute (FNTI). The FNTI is an Indigenous-owned post-secondary institute offering unique educational opportunities for Indigenous peoples.The First Peoples’ Aviation Technology program at FNTI is the only Indigenous aviation post-secondary program of its kind in Canada. 

With this investment, the FNTI will strengthen its aviation training program. It will double the number of Indigenous students training to become commercial pilots, enabling more Indigenous peoples to take advantage of growing economic opportunities in the aviation sector. The Government of Canada investment will support Indigenous students through the purchase of five new training aircraft; hiring additional aircraft maintenance engineers, flight instructors, dispatch staff, academic faculty and student support facilitators; and acquiring innovative safety maintenance software. 

Quotes

“The Government of Canada is pleased to support the First Nations Technical Institute in increasing its capacity while helping to break down some of the barriers currently facing Indigenous peoples in pursuing careers in aviation. This is an excellent time to help enable more candidates to enter this high demand field.”

The Honourable Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

“FedDev Ontario’s support for the expansion of this vital training program is so important. With new and more specialized capabilities, FNTI will be able to offer more Indigenous pilots the chance to join a dynamic and growing sector of the Canadian economy. This will not only bring benefits to communities right across the country, it will also help create good quality jobs for many years to come.”

The Honourable Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario

“Today’s investment in the First Peoples’ Aviation Technology program is a game changer, and I share the excitement our friends and neighbours at FNTI as this program continues to grow. Programs like this are critical for the sustainability of Indigenous communities, particularly rural and northern ones, across Canada. The pilots and aviation experts trained by FNTI will have an incredible impact in helping deliver supplies to families, provide emergency support in times of need, and keep the communities reliant on aviation open and accessible when other forms of travel are unfeasible. With FNTI recently experiencing unprecedented student enrolment, particularly among women in the Aviation Technology Program, they are continuing to set themselves apart as leaders across Canada, and I am so proud that they are a fixture of our area.”

Mike Bossio
Member of Parliament for Hastings–Lennox and Addington

“Through this support FNTI will be able to create more educational opportunities for Indigenous learners, reduce our waiting list, and ensure pathways for Indigenous graduates into the aviation industry. More students and more graduates will assist with creating sustainability in remote communities across Canada and help increase role models for the next generation of Indigenous pilots in the aviation industry.”

Suzanne Brant
President, First Nations Technical Institute
Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory ‎

“We greatly appreciate the financial support of the Government of Canada for this project. The Government of Canada’s investment in the First Nations Technical Institute shows that our communities succeed when we work together. Our partnership with Ministers Bains and Garneau is a strong one, and this initiative with FNTI will help increase labour force participation of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte community on and off the Territory, and help Indigenous students across Canada, find good, well-paying jobs.”

Chief R. Donald Maracle
Tyendinaga Mohawk Council

Quick Facts

  • The Government of Canada is working with industry partners and stakeholders to explore how skill development programs can be enhanced for the transportation sector, particularly in aviation, and to develop strategies to increase participation of underrepresented groups including Indigenous peoples and women.
  • The project also aligns with the Government of Canada’s Economic Development Strategy for Rural Canada, by helping the FNTI improve programming that will benefit rural communities while increasing access to jobs, training and educational opportunities for Indigenous peoples.

Associated Link

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Government of Canada invests in transportation infrastructure improvements at the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport

Provided by Transport Canada/CNW

WINNIPEG, Sept. 6, 2019 /CNW/ – The quality of Canada’s transportation infrastructure and the efficiency of the country’s trade corridors are key to the success of Canadian companies in the global marketplace. The Government of Canada invests in infrastructure projects that create quality, middle-class jobs and support economic growth.

Winnipeg Airport

Airports are important economic drivers. The Government of Canada recognizes the significant role played by Canada’s airports in supporting jobs and tourism, enabling investment and facilitating trade. That is why the Government is investing to improve airport infrastructure.

Today, Doug Eyolfson, Member of Parliament for Charleswood — St. James — Assiniboia — Headingley, on behalf of the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, announced a major investment of $30.4 million to increase air cargo capacity at Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, and move Canadian goods to international markets more efficiently.

The airport is a key transportation hub for central Canada, the Canadian North, and for Canada’s international trade flows. This project, financed by the Government of Canada and the Winnipeg Airports Authority, provides wide-ranging economic and trade benefits for Canadian producers in the region by offering additional export capacity for commodities that would otherwise be exported via U.S. transportation hubs. The project will also improve accessibility and affordability of goods in Canadian remote and Northern communities.

The construction of a 13,000 square-metre cargo logistics facility will include space for cold storage and perishable commodities, live animal handling, expanded air cargo capacity, and additional space for aircraft. This will benefit producers in multiple industries, particularly e-commerce, agricultural livestock, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and aerospace, which require the specialized storage space it will provide. It will also improve the efficiency and affordability of air resupply out of Winnipeg for remote and Northern communities.

This investment will have important economic and employment benefits for Canadians by creating an estimated 630 jobs during construction.

The Government of Canada is supporting infrastructure projects that contribute most to Canada’s success in international trade. Trade diversification is a key component of the National Trade Corridors Fund, through projects that: 

  • improve the performance of the transportation system to increase the value and volume of goods exported from Canada to overseas markets; and
  • generate new overseas trade as a result of the investment.

Quotes

“Transportation systems are a vital part of Winnipeg’s economy and the investment announced here today will foster long-term prosperity for the city. These improvements to the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport will help businesses and producers get more products to market.”

Doug Eyolfson
Member of Parliament for Charleswood — St. James — Assiniboia — Headingley

“Our government is investing in Canada’s economy by making improvements to our trade and transportation corridors. We are supporting projects to efficiently move goods to market and people to their destinations, stimulate economic growth, create quality middle-class jobs, and ensure that Canada’s transportation networks remain competitive and efficient.”

The Honourable Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Quick Facts

  • An efficient and reliable transportation network is key to Canada’s economic growth. The Government of Canada, through the National Trade Corridors Fund, is making investments that will support the flow of goods to international markets. While the United States continues to be Canada’s top trade partner with $741.4 billion in trade ($437.6 billion exported, $303.8 billion imported) in 2018, trade is growing with international markets. From 2015 to 2018, trade with Asia (excluding the Middle East) grew by 18.9 per cent to $199.2 billion and trade with the European Union grew by 19 per cent since 2015 to $118.1 billion in 2018.
  • This project will strengthen the safety and sustainability of the Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, which is part of the National Airports System. The 26 airports in the National Airports System serve about 95 percent of all scheduled passenger and cargo traffic in Canada, and handle almost all of Canada’s international trade flows by air.
  • The Government of Canada is making investments that help Canadian exporters accelerate their presence in new markets, and take advantage of the new opportunities that exist because of the trade agreements the Government has secured in the past three years. By investing in export-intensive industries, the Government is committed to the creation of well-paying jobs and strengthening Canada’s economy.
  • Through the Investing in Canada Plan, the Government of Canada is investing more than $180 billion over 12 years in public transit projects, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation routes, and Canada’s rural and northern communities.

Associated Links

Westjet drops 737 Max 8 from busy holiday-season flight schedule

News provided by CBC News – link to full story and video

WATCH: Videos

Decision means no Canadian airlines expected to use aircraft until 2020 even if it’s cleared to fly

Ian Hanomansing · CBC News · Sep 04, 2019

One of Westjet’s grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 jets, seen in the airline’s hangar in Calgary. Transport Canada has not yet indicated when the passenger planes could be cleared to fly again. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Forty one aircraft, three Canadian airlines and almost six months out of service. The grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 is affecting Canadian flights from coast to coast, and for Westjet passengers it’s now clear that impact will continue through the busy end-of-year holiday season.

Transport Canada has not yet given the jets permission to fly, but even if it does so before the end of the year, CBC News has learned Westjet will not be including the Max 8 jets in its holiday-season schedule, one of the peak travel times of the year.

Air Canada and Sunwing had already announced they won’t be flying their Max 8s until next year.

It’s possible the Boeing jets may be recertified to fly before the end of 2019 — Transport Canada isn’t saying when that might happen. But Brian Znotins, Westjet’s vice-president in charge of scheduling at the company’s headquarters in Calgary, says his airline made the decision because it needed to give passengers some certainty in making holiday bookings.

If the Max 8 is allowed to fly in December, at most Znotins says the airline might consider an occasional flight to ease demand.

“It’s a little harder to unmix the cake at that point, but we would look at peak days, the Friday before Christmas [for example] where we can still sell seats and we’ll put the airplane back in.”

No-fly decision

Until now, very little has been heard from Canadian airlines about the ongoing impact of the Max 8’s problems. But Westjet agreed to talk to CBC’s The National about the effects of the grounding on the airline’s operations.

The issue with the Max 8  began with two disasters: A total of 346 people killed in crashes involving Indonesia’s Lion Air in October 2018 and Ethiopian Airlines in March of this year.

A Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8, parked on the tarmac of Soekarno Hatta International airport near Jakarta, Indonesia. All Max 8 jets, about 350 in service around the world, have been grounded since March this year. (Willy Kurniawan/Reuters)

Investigators were troubled by the similarity between the crashes. Pilots on both planes appeared to be struggling to maintain control of their aircraft when they went down.

Boeing has acknowledged the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), designed to activate automatically to help keep a plane stable, seemed to be a factor in each crash. It appears erroneous air speed data triggered MCAS, which tried to push the nose of the jet down to increase speed while the pilots fought to counteract it.

In the days after the first crash on Oct. 29, 2018, some U.S. pilots complained Boeing hadn’t revealed that MCAS was embedded in the Max 8’s software. Speaking publicly for the first time on this issue, Westjet’s vice-president of flight operations, Scott Wilson, told CBC News that Westjet shared that concern.

“Our job as pilots is to know and understand the aircraft so that we can apply that knowledge in a normal and not normal situation,” he says. Not being told about MCAS, “created a bit of a trust deficit. There’s no doubt about it.”

Wilson adds that he made that erosion of trust clear to Boeing. “Absolutely. And they are well aware they’ve got to basically rebuild that gap.”

After the Lion Air disaster, he says the three Canadian airlines that fly the Max 8 worked with Boeing and Transport Canada to review pilot training and procedures, what Wilson called “a made-in-Canada solution.” He adds that the airlines were confident its pilots could fly the jet safely as a result.

But then on March 10 came the second catastrophic crash, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Within hours, Wilson says Transport Canada was again in contact with Air Canada, Sunwing and Westjet, sharing information about the tragedy and assessing the safety of the jets.

An emergency crew works at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 crash near Bishoftu, south of Addis Ababa, on March 11. All 157 people aboard the aircraft were killed. (Mulugeta Ayene/Associated Press)

“Obviously we’d never move an aircraft ever without a 100-per-cent assurance of its safety … and the information that we had at the time led us to believe that at that moment, that there was no increased risk to operating the aircraft,” Wilson says.

But governments around the world began taking action. The day after the Ethiopian crash, China banned the Max 8 from its airspace, and the next day the European aviation authority did the same. Three days after the crash, Canada and then the United States followed suit. 

At the time, Canada’s Minister of Transport Marc Garneau said there was new satellite data on the Ethiopian crash, “suggesting a possible although unproven similarity in the flight profile of the Lion Air aircraft.” 

Wilson explains that the data appeared to show that MCAS played a role in both the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines disasters. It wasn’t conclusive, but it was enough to ban the Max from carrying passengers in Canadian airspace.

All Boeing 737 Max 8s — about 350 planes flown by more than 50 airlines around the world — have been grounded ever since, as the manufacturer works to fix the problem and prove to aviation officials that the aircraft is safe.

Scott Wilson, Westjet’s vice-president of flight operations, in front of a grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 in the airline’s Calgary hangar. He says issues around software in the jet have created ‘a trust deficit’ between pilots and Boeing. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Challenging logistics

For Westjet, the grounding has left 13 jets parked at airports from Vancouver to Toronto, about 10 per cent of the airline’s seats. That has created an ongoing challenge for the airline’s schedulers and maintenance team.

The person in charge of maintenance, John Kelly, says his airline’s Max 8s are essentially ready to fly — their fluids are checked every 48 hours, and once a week each jet is powered up, taxis and then is parked again.

Watch: CBC NewsKeeping the 737 Max 8 flight-ready

Westjet’s vice-president of technical operations, John Kelly, takes CBC’s Ian Hanomansing into the wheel well of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 to explain how the airline is keeping the aircraft flight-ready while they’re grounded. 0:40

Standing in the gleaming Westjet hanger in Calgary, Kelly explained that the biggest challenge in this grounding hasn’t been the maintenance involved in keeping the Max 8s on standby, but the need to get more hours from the rest of the airline’s fleet.

“We pulled some planes out of heavy maintenance to help fly the schedule. We’re doing a lot more work on the other airplanes to keep them healthy and keep them flying.”

Among the work that’s been deferred is the job of putting new seats in Premium class of the airline’s older 737s, for example.

Mechanics do maintenance work on a Boeing 737 Max 8 in Westjet’s hangar in Calgary. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Making planes available is just the first part of the puzzle. Then comes reworking the flight schedule.

If you want a sense of the complexity of running an airline, walk through its operations centre. For Westjet it’s a room about the size of a gymnasium, filled with people tracking planes, watching the weather and calculating flight plans. When CBC News visited the centre, one of the scheduling issues the team was dealing with was fog in Prince George that had led to a two hour delay, which in turn affected that plane’s upcoming Vancouver-Victoria-Vancouver trip.

Weather problems are a fact of life for airlines. The impact of removing 13 jets for an indefinite period is infinitely more complicated.

That’s been the responsibility of Brian Znotins. With the uncertainty over when the jets will be returned to service, he has revised the airline’s flight schedule five times.

He compares the process to building a house. “You take away 7 per cent of the bricks and you still want to build that house and you have to get pretty creative.”

Brian Znotins oversees long-term scheduling for Westjet. He says uncertainty around when the 737 Max 8 will be able to return to passenger service has required the airline to revamp its schedules a number of times in recent weeks. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

In a July 29 interview, WestJet chief executive Ed Sims told CBC News that the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 is having a “substantial negative impact” on the airline. He declined to give specifics on the financial hit, but said the grounding has forced WestJet to increase spending on fuel and cut routes.

One summer route — Halifax to Paris — was cancelled for the season, for example. A direct flight from Vancouver to Regina has also been suspended. Some daytime flights have been moved to overnight. But with its older 737s flying more often, Znotins says Westjet has been able to maintain 98 per cent of what would have been its schedule with the Max 8s in the air.

It’s a similar story at Air Canada. The bigger airline had a fleet of 24 Max 8s, and was expecting 12 more by the end of June. Asked about the impact of the grounding on its operations, Air Canada directed CBC to its most recent quarterly report, which states the airline has managed to cover “97 per cent of our planned flying” without those aircraft. 

Aviation analyst Rick Ericksen says he’s impressed with how Canadian airlines are coping and how all three have handled the grounding. But he says that aside from the lost revenue, the airlines have very little excess aircraft capacity left at the moment to deal with any other problems that may arise.

Awaiting clearance

The question remains: when will the Max 8 be cleared to fly again?

All Transport Canada will say is that it “will not lift the current flight restriction … until it is fully satisfied that all concerns have been addressed by the manufacturer and U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, and adequate flight crew procedures and training are in place.”

Air Canada has announced it won’t fly the Max 8 any sooner than Jan. 8, 2020.

For Sunwing, it’s May. 

Westjet may be the best positioned of the three Canadian airlines to get the Max 8s up quickly once the flight restriction is lifted. Its Max pilots have been active, flying the airline’s older-model 737s. Kelly, in charge of maintenance, says after a software update the Max 8s should be ready to fly.

But vice-president of flight operations Scott Wilson concedes there is another challenge the airlines will face: attracting passengers who may be reluctant to fly on a plane that’s suffered two recent crashes.


Watch The National’s story about how the Boeing 737 Max 8 grounding is affecting operations at Westjet:

We go in-depth with WestJet to find out how the grounding of its 737 Max fleet is hitting customers, and the airline itself.

Government of Canada investing in safety at the Prince Albert (Glass Field) Airport

Provided by Transport Canada/CNW

Provided by Prince Albert Airport

PRINCE ALBERT, SK, Sept. 4, 2019 /CNW/ – Canadians, tourists and businesses benefit from safe and well-maintained airports. From visiting friends and family, to travelling to medical appointments, or getting goods to market, we rely on our local airports to support and sustain vibrant communities. These airports also provide essential air services including community resupply, air ambulance, search and rescue and forest fire response.

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard and Member of Parliament for North Vancouver, on behalf of the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, visited the Prince Albert (Glass Field) Airport today to highlight the recent completion of four safety improvement projects – the purchase of a runway snowblower, the construction of a sand storage shed, the purchase of a runway condition reporting system and friction tester, and the replacement of a grader.

The runway snowblower, a 3,500 HP self-propelled model, and the grader, with a 200 HP engine and carbide scraper blade, are used to remove ice and snow from runways, taxiways and the apron. The sand storage shed protects the sand, granular and liquid products used on airside surfaces from snow, ice and rain, while the runway condition reporting system and friction tester provide timely, accurate and precise wireless recording and reporting of runway conditions and relays the information directly to aircraft to help ensure safe landings.

Well-maintained runways, taxiways and aprons, free of ice and snow, ensure safe usage by aircraft, passengers, and crews, and help protect costly airport safety assets during airport operations.

Funding of $1,136,665 was provided for these projects through Transport Canada’s Airports Capital Assistance Program.

Quotes

“The Prince Albert (Glass Field) Airport is an important hub for residents, businesses and tourists in this region. This investment will help ensure continued safe and reliable operations for aircraft, passengers and flight crews, while supporting tourism and social and economic development in the region.”

The Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson
Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard and Member of Parliament for North Vancouver

“Our Government recognizes that local airports are major contributors to the economic growth and social well-being of smaller communities. In addition to supporting travel and tourism, local airports are key connectors for business, health care, social services, and emerging resource development sectors. These investments will improve access to safe, efficient and accessible air transportation options, and will help us deliver on our promise to build safer, healthier and stronger communities across Canada.”

The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Quick Facts

  • This funding comes from Transport Canada’s Airports Capital Assistance Program (ACAP).
  • Since the Program started in 1995, the Government of Canada has invested more than $882.7 million for 948 projects at 186 airports across the country.
  • To date, the Prince Albert (Glass Field) Airport has received more than $12.2 million in ACAP funding for 13 safety projects, including the rehabilitation of pavement on Runway 08-26; the rehabilitation and reconfiguration of the taxiway and apron; the upgrade of airfield lighting systems; and the purchase of snow removal equipment.

Associated Links

Government of Canada invests in transportation infrastructure at the International Aerocity of Mirabel

Provided by Transport Canada

MONTRÉAL, Sept. 3, 2019 /CNW/ – The quality of Canada’s transportation infrastructure and the efficiency of the country’s trade corridors are key to the success of Canadian companies in the global marketplace. The Government of Canada invests in infrastructure projects that create quality, middle-class jobs and support economic growth.

Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, announced a major investment of $50 million to improve air freight and logistics at the International Aerocity of Mirabel to help local businesses compete by moving Canadian goods to international markets.

The work includes refurbishing and extending the main apron to a cargo apron; improving the road network in the area for easier access to the new cargo apron and to increase aircraft parking capacity; and building 20,000 square metres of warehouse space dedicated to air freight and logistics.

This project will support the increase of Canadian goods exported overseas markets by providing Montreal Airport with the necessary facilities in Mirabel to accommodate growth in export and import volumes of goods. This investment will have important economic benefits for Canadians and create quality middle-class jobs during construction.

The Government of Canada is supporting infrastructure projects that contribute most to Canada’s success in international trade. Trade diversification is a key component of the National Trade Corridors Fund, through projects that: 

  • improve the performance of the transportation system to increase the value and volume of goods exported from Canada to overseas markets; and
  • generate new overseas trade as a result of the investment.

Quotes

“Our government is proud to invest in this infrastructure that plays a key role for Canada’s economy. By investing in our transportation and trade corridors we are stimulating economic growth and creating quality middle-class jobs.”

The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Quick Facts

  • An efficient and reliable transportation network is key to Canada’s economic growth. The Government of Canada, through the National Trade Corridors Fund is making investments that will support the flow of goods to international markets. While the United States continues to be Canada’s top trade partner with $741.4 billion in trade ($437.6 billion exported, $303.8 billion imported) in 2018, trade is growing with international markets. From 2015 to 2018, trade with Asia (excluding the Middle East) grew by 18.9 per cent to $199.2 billion and trade with the European Union grew by 19 per cent since 2015 to $118.1 billion in 2018.
  • The Government of Canada is making investments that help Canadian exporters accelerate their presence in new markets, and take advantage of the new opportunities that exist because of the trade agreements the Government has secured in the past three years. By investing in export-intensive industries, the Government is committed to the creation of well-paying jobs and strengthening Canada’s economy.
  • Through the Investing in Canada plan, the Government of Canada is investing more than $180 billion over 12 years in public transit projects, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation routes, and Canada’srural and northern communities.

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Statement – Order prohibiting the development of an aerodrome in Saint-Roch-de-l’Achigan

Provided by Transport Canada/CNW

OTTAWA, Aug. 30, 2019 /CNW/ – The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, issued a statement today regarding the proposed aerodrome at Saint-Roch-de-l’Achigan, Quebec:

“For reasons of public interest, I issued an order prohibiting the aerodrome development project as proposed by the Proponent.

“In this case, deficiencies were identified with regard to the consultation led by the proponent and the proposal for the aerodrome development project, including a lack of clarity on the anticipated activities at the aerodrome and the impact of the sound footprint on the community, which confirmed the need for intervention on this matter.

“I made that decision based on Section 4.32 of the Aeronautics Act (https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/PDF/A-2.pdf), which allows me to prohibit the development of an aerodrome if it is likely to adversely affect aviation safety or is not in the public interest.”

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Transport Canada fines drone pilot over two incidents in Toronto

Provided by Transport Canada/CNW

OTTAWA, Aug. 29, 2019 /CNW/ – Canadians need to feel safe on the ground and in the sky. This includes when they are travelling on a flight or attending public events.

Following an investigation of two incidents in downtown Toronto, Transport Canada has issued Notices of Assessment of Monetary Penalties to an individual for 11 violations of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARS) related to the operation of a remotely piloted aircraft system – commonly known as a drone.

During celebrations after the final game of the National Basketball Association Championship on June 13, 2019, and during the Toronto Raptor’s victory celebration four days later, an individual flew a drone over both outdoor events. The flights appeared to be in violation of several provisions of the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

Transport Canada opened an investigation into the incidents, and based on the evidence collected, the individual has been served fines totalling $2,750.

The alleged violations and associated penalties include:

  • CAR section 901.02: No person shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft system unless it is registered […]. Total penalty of $500 (two alleged violations at $250 each);
  • CAR section 901.14(1): […] no pilot shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft in controlled airspace. Total penalty of $500 (two alleged violations at $250 each);
  • CAR section 901.26: […] no pilot shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft at a distance of less than 100 feet (30 m) from another person, measured horizontally and at any altitude […]. Total penalty of $500 (two alleged violations at $250 each);
  • CAR section 901.41(1): No pilot shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft system at any special aviation event or at any advertised event except in accordance with a special flight operations certificate […]. Total penalty of $250;
  • CAR section 901.47(2): […] no pilot shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft at a distance of less than (a) three nautical miles from the centre of an airport; and (b) one nautical mile from the centre of a heliport. Total penalty of $500 (two alleged violations at $250 each); and,
  • CAR section 901.54(1): […] no person shall operate a remotely piloted aircraft system under this Division unless the person […] holds either (i) a pilot certificate – small remotely piloted aircraft (VLOS) – basic operations […]; or (ii) a pilot certificate – small remotely piloted aircraft (VLOS) – advanced operations […].Total penalty of $500 (two alleged violations at $250 each).

In support of the Minister of Transport’s mandate to protect Canadians and aviation safety, Transport Canada’s drone regulations came into effect June 1, 2019. It is mandatory for pilots of all remotely piloted aircraft weighing more than 250 grams and less than 25 kilograms to register their drones and obtain a drone pilot certificate (Basic or Advanced). There are additional requirements for drone pilots who want to fly in controlled airspace or over bystanders, including holding an Advanced Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Pilot certificate; passing a flight review; seeking NAV CANADA’s permission to fly in the airspace; and flying a drone that has been declared safe for the intended purpose by the manufacturer. Administrative monetary penalties are put in place to ensure compliance with the regulations.

Individuals who have been served with or sent a Notice of Assessment of Monetary Penalty may file a request with the Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada for a review of the facts of the alleged violation(s) or of the amount of the penalty.

Quote

“Transport Canada is committed to enhancing aviation and public safety while encouraging innovation and economic growth in the drone sector, but operating a drone in Canadian airspace is a regulated activity and the department will enforce the regulations to ensure compliance. The safety of Canadians is our number one priority. Drone pilots must fly responsibly and must never put people or aircraft in danger.”

The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport

Associated Links