Category: Vancouver YVR

Air Canada / Air Canada rouge Winter 2019 Long-Haul changes as of 16 July 2019

News provided by RoutesOnline.com – link to full article

By Jim Liu – Posted 17 July 2019

Air Canada in the last few weeks filed additional changes to its long-haul operation for winter 2019/20 season, including service operated by Air Canada rouge. Latest adjustment as of 16 July 2019 as follows.

Montreal – Frankfurt 787-9 replaces A330-300 during following: 01DEC19 – 08DEC19, 18DEC19 – 05JAN20
Toronto – Frankfurt AC876/877 aircraft changes, 787-9 replaced by following:
27OCT19 – 30JAN20 777-200LR
31JAN20 – 27MAR20 777-300ER

Toronto – Vienna Planned seasonal frequency adjustment from 7 to 5 weekly unchanged. 787-8 replaces -9 from 27OCT19 to 04FEB20 (-8 previously scheduled for entire winter season)
Toronto – Zurich eff 27OCT19 787-9 continues operating (A330-300 previously filed 27OCT19 – 30NOV19)
Vancouver – London Heathrow 27OCT19 – 16DEC19 787-9 replaces 777-300ER (787-9 in W18 operated in November only)

Air Canada rouge changes:
Toronto – Bogota eff 03DEC19 Increase from 6 to 7 weekly, 767 operating (previously scheduled from 17DEC19)
Toronto – Cartagena eff 14DEC19 A321 replaces A319, increase from 2 to 3 weekly

Previously reported Mainline changes:
Calgary – London Heathrow Selected dates in Feb 2020 scheduled with 777-300ER aircraft, replacing 787-9
Montreal – Brussels eff 26OCT19 787-9 replaces previously filed -8
Montreal – Casablanca 
27OCT19 – 14NOV19 767-300ER replaces A330-300, 3 weekly
eff 07DEC19 Increase from 3 to 4 weekly for winter season

Montreal – Rome Routine seasonal suspension from 31DEC19 to 29FEB20; Previously filed 787-8 service to be replaced by following:
28OCT19 – 30NOV19 787-9
02DEC19 – 30DEC19 A330-300
01MAR20 – 27MAR20 A330-300

Montreal – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 
eff 11DEC19 3 weekly 787-9, new route
Montreal – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 27OCT19 787-9 continues to operate this route, replacing -8
Montreal – Tokyo Narita eff 27OCT19 787-9 continues to operate this route, replacing -8
Toronto – Dubai eff 27OCT19 Increase from 3-4 weekly to 5 weekly, 787-9 operating
Toronto – Milan Malpensa eff 27OCT19 Service converted from year-round to summer seasonal. Previously planned 3 weekly 767 in W19 cancelled 
Toronto – Mumbai 
eff 27OCT19 Seasonal service resumption. Service operates 3 weekly from 27OCT19 to 06DEC19, instead of 4 weekly. 777-200LR operating
Toronto – Rome eff 27OCT19 A330-300 replaces previously filed 787-8. Routine seasonal suspension scheduled from 05JAN20
Toronto – Santiago de Chile – Buenos Aires Ezeiza eff 27OCT19 777-300ER replaces 787-9 in NW18, 5-6 weekly
Toronto – Sao Paulo Guarulhos eff 27OCT19 787-9 continues to operate 1 daily, replacing previously filed 777-300ER
Toronto – Seoul Incheon eff 27OCT19 787-8 replaces -9, service operates 6 weekly for entire W19, instead of 4-6 weekly
Vancouver – Auckland eff 12DEC19 4 weekly 787-8, new route
Vancouver – Hong Kong eff 27OCT19 450-seater 777-300ER continues operating in W19, replacing previously filed 787-9

Previously reported rouge changes:
Toronto – Quito eff 08DEC19 3 weekly 767, new route

Severe turbulence seen on Air Canada flight will only get worse

News provided by DigitalJournal.com – link to full article

BY KAREN GRAHAM    

An Air Canada plane on a flight from Vancouver to Sydney, Australia experienced severe turbulence Thursday, injuring 37 passengers, nine of them seriously. However, with the climate crisis, this will become a lot more common in the future.

On Thursday, Air Canada flight 33 was diverted to Hawaii after hitting a patch of severe air turbulence. The injuries included lacerations and head, back and neck injuries with some passengers actually being thrown from their seats to the ceiling of the airline cabin.Air Canada spokesperson Peter Fitzpatrick said the Boeing 777-200 was carrying 269 passengers and 15 crew and was about two hours past Hawaii when it hit “severe clear air turbulence.”“In the minds of the passengers, the plane is plummeting hundreds or thousands of feet, but we might only see a twitch of 10 or 20 feet on the altimeter,” said Patrick Smith, commercial pilot, and host of AskThePilot.com, in an interview with The Points Guy.

Global News Video – click here

“In really rare cases, it can injure people and damage aircraft, but in practice, it’s a comfort and convenience issue rather than a safety issue.” While downplaying the dangers of severe turbulence, he did point out that basically, “turbulence” is a coverall term for an instability in the air around a plane caused by winds, air pressure, temperature differentials, nearby storms, jet streams, weather fronts and other atmospheric conditions.

But It’s Getting Worse, and more frequent

Finding a flight path to avoid turbulence is always a concern for airlines. Although turbulence is often unavoidable, pilots can usually work out where the rough areas will be located by looking at weather forecasts and wind variability data. In fact, most modern aircraft use algorithms to keep tabs on high turbulence zones.But with Clear Air Turbulence (CAT) – you can’t see it – and it’s difficult to predict. That is the big difference in CAT and turbulence caused by weather fronts and other atmospheric conditions.

On May 27  2011 the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite...
On May 27, 2011 the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite passed over the western United States and captured this stunning true-color image of wave clouds stretching across the region. The drier air of summer, along with weaker westerly winds, makes wave formation difficult. NASA

A study from the University of Reading published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences on April 6, 2017, was the first to examine the future of clear air turbulence, according to Digital Journal.

By analyzing the effects of increased CO2 emissions on the jet stream over the Atlantic Ocean, the world’s busiest air corridor, the research team found that the increased CO2 emissions will create havoc in the air.

It was determined that the average amount of light turbulence will have increased by 59 percent, moderate by 94 percent, and severe by 149 percent by the middle of the century. The uneven warming patterns in the jet stream will make it more disordered and stronger, creating, even more, turbulence.

NASA s Kuiper Airborne Observatory  1971-1995:  One of the instruments on this flying laboratory was...
NASA’s Kuiper Airborne Observatory, 1971-1995: One of the instruments on this flying laboratory was an infrared radiometer intended to detect clear air turbulence. NASA

This means that the extreme air turbulence experienced by the passengers on Air Canada flight 33 could double or even triple as carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rise. This also means occurrences of severe clear air turbulence will become more common.

“That’s because more C02 means warmer temperatures, which means shifting wind patterns with stronger and less predictable airflow,” said Paul Williams, a professor of atmospheric science and lead author of the 2017 study at the University of Reading in the U.K., according to Global News.

“The special thing about severe (clear air turbulence) is that it’s stronger than gravity,” he said. “So the vertical motions will be happening more rapidly than gravity. If you’re not seatbelted, or any objects are not secured, they will become catapults.”

Continental Airlines Boeing B737-524
Continental Airlines Boeing B737-524 at Houston (IAH)
Nothanks, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Cost to airlines increasing

The climate crisis is having economic impacts on the airline industry. While dangerous air turbulence is a threat to safety and economic security, climate change has given us a whole new list of problems associated with global warming. As more and more extreme weather events take place, there will be more frequent groundings of flights.

This means a loss of pay for airline employees and in particular flight attendants who earn an hourly wage while in the air. The disruption of air travel will leave even more travelers stranded at airports – a not-so-pretty picture. But we’re not just talking about blizzards and torrential rains.

Extreme heat can also ground airlines. In June 2017, airlines in Phoenix, Arizona were forced to cancel some flights because it was too hot for planes to take off. Basically, as the air warms, it spreads out, becoming less dense. This results in less lift-generation by an airplane’s wings at a given airspeed as the aircraft gathers speed along the runway, making it difficult to rise off the runway.

Dozens hurt after Vancouver-Australia Air Canada flight hits turbulence

News provided by CityNews1130.com – link to full article

BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

Posted Jul 11, 2019 12:53 pm PDT

Last Updated Jul 11, 2019 at 4:31 pm PDT

Paramedics tend to passengers injured after severe turbulence forced an Air Canada plane en route from Toronto to Sydney make an emergency landing in Hawaii. (Photo credit: Hurricane Falls)

SUMMARY

  • At least 35 passengers on board an Air Canada flight from Vancouver to Sydney were hurt during turbulence Thursday
  • Flight AC33 was about two hours past Hawaii over the Pacific Ocean when ‘unforecasted and sudden turbulence’ hit
  • The turbulence triggered a turnaround and caused ‘minor injuries’ for about 35 travellers, the airline said in an email

Nearly three dozen passengers and crew sustained minor injuries Thursday when an Air Canada flight travelling from Toronto to Sydney, Australia, ran into severe turbulence, prompting an emergency landing in Honolulu.

Flight AC33 was about two hours past Hawaii over the Pacific Ocean early Thursday morning when “unforecasted and sudden turbulence” triggered a turnaround and caused “minor injuries” for about 35 travellers, the airline said in an email.

Eyewitnesses described a gut-churning drop in altitude that slammed passengers and flight attendants into the ceiling.

“We hit turbulence and we all hit the roof and everything fell down, and stuff… people went flying,” passenger Jess Smith told local station KHON in Honolulu.

“I watched a whole bunch of people hit the ceiling of the plane,” said Alex MacDonald. “A couple of the air hostesses were bringing food out at the time, and they hit the roof as well. But as a whole people seem to be OK, didn’t seem to be any major injuries.”

MacDonald added that staff and ground crew were “amazing” in the wake of the incident.

WATCH: Passengers describe the panic onboard during the severe turbulence

The aircraft, a Boeing 777-200, had 269 passengers and 15 crew members on board.

Some received medical attention on arrival at the airport in Honolulu, according to Air Canada.

“Our first priority is always the safety of our flights, passengers and crew and as a precaution, medical personnel are on standby to examine passengers in Honolulu,” Air Canada spokeswoman Isabelle Arthur said.

Honolulu Emergency Services Department spokeswoman wasn’t able to immediately provide details about what kinds of injuries were involved.

The airline said it is arranging hotel accommodations and meals for passengers in Honolulu as well as options for resumption of the flight.

The turbulence happened at about 10,970 metres 966 kilometres southwest of Honolulu, said U.S. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

WATCH: Video taken onboard shows the plane’s oxygen masks hanging from the overhead compartment

-With files from Aleksandra Sagan and The Associated Press

Air Transat is synonymous with Sun to travellers from Quebec

Provided by Transat A.T. Inc/CNW

Carrier strengthens its position as a leader in holiday travel this winter with new flight to New Orleans and year-round service to Spain

MONTREAL, July 4, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Transat is pleased to present travellers from Quebec with its enhanced Sun destinations program for winter 2019–2020, including the southern United StatesMexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America, and Europe. The lineup includes a brand-new destination, New Orleans, Louisiana, available as of November with twice-weekly direct service. Named the 2019 World’s Best Leisure Airline by Skytrax, Air Transat will become the only carrier to offer direct flights from Montreal to this festive destination.

With new Airbus A321neoLR aircraft added to its fleet in time for winter operations this year, Air Transat will have greater flexibility to offer travellers a broader range of destinations. The company will feature a total of 42 South and Europedestinations out of Montreal, and 13 out of Quebec City.

On the Europe front, the carrier will now serve Spain’s Costa del Sol year-round, with direct service to Malaga from Montreal (two flights a week), and will also fly to Madrid starting in December (two direct flights weekly).

New Sun destinations 
Air Transat will put increased focus on Florida travel this winter, continuing its Orlando service (three direct flights per week) and adding frequency to Fort Lauderdale, with direct flights now available daily out of Montreal during the peak season. The carrier will also boost frequency on its Quebec City–Fort Lauderdale route, offering five direct flights a week.

Also out of Montreal, Air Transat will be enriching its Dominican Republic program with one additional direct flight each week to Puerto Plata (for a total of five direct flights a week), as well as adding another flight to Montego Bay, Jamaica(four direct flights per week). Cuba will be more accessible for travellers flying out of Quebec City, with the addition of direct service to Holguin, for a total of two direct flights weekly.

Europe in winterIn addition to the Costa del Sol and Madrid in Spain, Air Transat will continue serving Portugal this winter, with direct flights to Lisbon. It will also maintain its daily direct service between Montreal and Paris. And beginning in mid-December, residents of the Quebec City region will enjoy twice-weekly direct service to the French capital.

Discovering Canada and Europe with domestic and connecting flights
Air Transat’s domestic flights, which link some major Canadian cities, will allow Quebecers to explore other regions in Canada as well as transatlantic destinations accessible via connecting flights.The airline will continue its daily direct flights between Montreal and Toronto, and three direct weekly flights linking Montreal and Vancouver.

From Montreal – 42 South and Europe destinations

SouthNumber of flights (in peak season)
Caribbean
Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe2 direct flights a week
Port-au-Prince, Haiti2 direct flights a week
Montego Bay, Jamaica4 direct flights a week
Fort-de-France, Martinique2 direct flights a week
Saint-Martin/St. Maarten1 direct flight a week
Central and South America
Cartagena, Colombia2 direct flights a week
San Andres, Colombia1 direct flight a week
Liberia, Costa Rica2 direct flights a week
San José, Costa Rica2 direct flights a week
Roatan, Honduras2 direct flights a week
Rio Hato, Panama2 direct flights a week
El Salvador, Salvador1 direct flight a week
Cuba
Cayo Coco4 direct flights a week
Cayo Largo2 direct flights a week
Cayo Santa Maria4 direct flights a week
Havana1 direct flight a week
Holguin5 direct flights a week
VaraderoDaily direct flights
Dominican Republic
La Romana2 direct flights a week
Puerto Plata5 direct flights a week
Punta CanaDaily direct flights
Samana3 direct flights a week
Santo Domingo1 direct flight a week
Mexico
Acapulco1 direct flight a week
Cancun / Riviera MayaDaily direct flights
Cozumel1 direct flight a week
Puerto Vallarta3 direct flights a week
United States
Fort Lauderdale, FloridaDaily direct flights
Orlando, Florida3 direct flights a week
New Orleans, Louisiana2 direct flights a week
San Juan, Puerto Rico1 direct flight a week
EuropeNumber of flights (in peak season)
France
ParisDaily direct flights
Italy
Rome2 flights a week via Toronto (until mid-January)
Portugal
Faro1 flight a week via Toronto
Lisbon2 direct flights a week and 2 flights a week via Toronto
Porto1 flight a week via Toronto
Spain
Barcelona2 flights a week via Toronto (until mid-January)
Madrid2 direct flights a week
Malaga2 direct flights a week
United Kingdom
Glasgow2 flights a week via Toronto
London7 flights a week via Toronto
Manchester3 flights a week via Toronto

From Montreal – Domestic flights

CanadaNumber of flights
TorontoDaily direct flights
Vancouver4 direct flights a week

From Quebec City – 13 South and Europe destinations

SouthNumber of flights (in peak season)
Cuba
Cayo Coco2 direct flights a week
Cayo Santa Maria2 direct flights a week
Holguin2 direct flights a week
Varadero3 direct flights a week
Dominican Republic
La Romana1 direct flight a week
Puerto Plata1 direct flight a week
Punta Cana4 direct flights a week
Samana1 direct flight a week
Florida
Fort Lauderdale5 direct flights a week
Orlando2 direct flights a week
Mexico
Cancun / Riviera Maya4 direct flights a week
Puerto Vallarta1 direct flight a week
Europe
Paris, France2 direct flights a week

Air Transat is synonymous with Sun to travellers in Western Canada

Provided by Transat A.T. Inc/CNW

The airline is strengthening its position as a leader in holiday travel this winter with new flights to Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic and Florida

MONTREAL, July 4, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Transat is pleased to present travellers in Western Canada with its enriched winter 2019-2020 program for Sun destinations in Central AmericaMexicoFlorida, the Caribbean and Europe. Named the 2019 World’s Best Leisure Airline by Skytrax, Air Transat will be introducing beachgoers from the Vancouver area to new destinations in Florida, Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic. Travellers will have a choice of 20 South and Europe destinations from Vancouver. The most scenic beaches in the South will be accessible to passengers flying out of Calgary, Victoria, Edmonton and Winnipeg as well.

New destinations and more flights to the most popular Sun destinations  
The addition of new Airbus A321neoLRs to its fleet next winter will allow the carrier greater flexibility to offer a wider choice of destinations to travellers. As of December, Air Transat will become the sole company to fly direct from Vancouver to Fort Lauderdale, Florida (two direct flights a week), while also adding departures to Liberia and San Jose, Costa Rica, (two flights a week) as well as a direct flight to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Along with its new destinations from Vancouver, Air Transat will enhance its flight program from Calgary, adding another direct flight to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, for a total of four direct flights a week.  

Europe in winterFrom Vancouver, several of Canadians’ favourite European Sun destinations—such as Faro and Lisbon in Portugal and Madrid, Barcelona and Malaga in Spain—will be readily accessible via Montreal and Toronto. Flying through Toronto or Montreal, passengers will also be able to holiday in LondonGlasgow and Manchester in the United Kingdom too, as well as in Paris, France. 

Discovering more destinations with domestic and connecting flights
Air Transat’s domestic flights, which link some major Canadian cities, will allow British Columbians to explore other regions in Canada as well as South and transatlantic destinations accessible via connecting flights. The airline will continue its five direct weekly flights between Vancouver and Toronto and four direct weekly flights between Vancouverand Montreal.

From Vancouver: 20 South and Europe destinations

SouthNumber of flights (during peak season)
Costa Rica
Liberia2 flights a week
San Jose2 flights a week
Cuba
Cayo Santa Maria1 flight a week via Toronto
Holguin1 flight a week via Toronto
Varadero1 flight a week via Toronto
Dominican Republic
Puerto Plata1 flight a week via Toronto
Punta Cana1 direct flight a week and 3 flights a week via Toronto
Florida
Fort Lauderdale2 direct flights a week
Jamaica
Montego Bay, Jamaica1 flight a week via Toronto
Mexico
Cancun-Riviera Maya3 direct flights a week
Puerto Vallarta4 direct flights a week
EuropeNumber of flights (during peak season)
France
Paris3 flights a week via Montreal
Portugal
Faro2 flights a week via Toronto
Lisbon2 flights a week via Montreal
Spain
Barcelona1 flight a week via Toronto (until mid-January)
Madrid1 flight a week via Montreal (as of December)
Malaga1 flight a week via Montreal
United Kingdom
Glasgow4 flights a week via Toronto
London5 flights a week via Toronto
Manchester1 flight a week via Toronto

From Vancouver: domestic flights

Canada
Toronto5 direct flights a week
Montreal4 direct flights a week

From Victoria: 2 South destinations

MexicoNumber of flights (during peak season)
Cancun-Riviera Maya1 direct flight a week
Puerto Vallarta1 direct flight a week

From Calgary: 2 South destinations

SouthNumber of flights (during peak season)
Mexico
Cancun-Riviera Maya3 direct flights a week
Puerto Vallarta4 direct flights a week

From Edmonton: 3 South destinations

MexicoNumber of flights (during peak season)
Cancun-Riviera Maya3 direct flights a week
Huatulco1 direct flight a week
Puerto Vallarta3 direct flights a week

From Winnipeg: 4 South destinations

CubaNumber of flights (during peak season)
Varadero1 direct flight a week
Dominican Republic
Punta Cana1 direct flight a week
Mexico
Cancun-Riviera Maya3 direct flights a week
Puerto Vallarta3 direct flights a week

Canada’s Airlines, Airports Among World’s Worst For Delays, And It Could Soon Get Worse

News provided HuffingtonPost.ca – link to full article – with a hint from P.N.

By Daniel Tencer 4 July 2019

Under a new “passenger bill of rights,” airlines will be able to leave passengers stuck on the tarmac for longer than the current standard.
An airplane taking off at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International
An airplane taking off at Toronto’s Lester B. Pearson International Airport.

MONTREAL ― Canadian airports and airlines are some of the worst performers worldwide when it comes to flight delays, and new federal rules that allow passengers to be stuck on the tarmac for longer could make things worse.

All but one of Canada’s major airlines rank in the bottom half for on-time performance in a new survey from travel data provider OAG. 

Canada’s best performer, WestJet, ranks 57th out of 125 airlines surveyed, with 77.1 per cent of all flights arriving on time. The country’s worst performer, Sunwing, ranks as the second-worst airline in the world, 124th out of 125, with only 57.8 per cent of flights on time.

Sunwing experienced numerous flight glitches in recent years, including major delays in Toronto and Montreal in April, 2018, that led to a fine from the Canadian Transportation Agency.

Canada's Airlines, Airports Among World's Worst For Delays, And It Could Soon Get

Looking at airports, Canada doesn’t fare much better. Our best airport, in Grande Prairie, Alta., ranks 108th out of 505 airports surveyed.

Toronto’s two commercial passenger airports, Pearson and Billy Bishop, rank as the two worst airports in Canada and among the worst in the world ― 475th and 489th, respectively.

Interestingly, there is a yawning east-west divide, with western Canadian airports performing better than others.

Canada's Airlines, Airports Among World's Worst For Delays, And It Could Soon Get

The survey comes as Canada is about to launch a new “passengers’ bill of rights” that some critics say will make it easier for airlines to delay flights.

Under the new regulations, airlines will be able to keep passengers stuck on the tarmac for up to three hours, plus an additional 45 minutes if the airline believes takeoff is imminent.

Currently, Canada has no government-enforced limits on tarmac delays, but airlines themselves had standards built into their tariffs. The industry standard was 90 minutes, which is also what a Senate committee recommended be the rule in the new passenger bill of rights. The government rejected that recommendation.

Airlines themselves have been pushing for longer tarmac delays. Air Canada extended its maximum tarmac time to four hours in 2018.

Additionally, it will be very difficult to get compensation from airlines in most cases where flights are delayed or passengers are denied boarding, said Gabor Lukacs, a prominent consumer advocate who has challenged airline practices in courts.

Watch: Here are the budget airlines in Canada. Story continues below.

Lukacs said he worries about the possibility of longer delays under the new rules because “when something becomes legal, they will do it. On the other hand, the counterargument is it’s in the airline’s best interest to get passengers to their destination as quickly as possible.”

Lukacs’ advocacy group, Air Passenger Rights, has accused the government of letting the airline industry dictate the new passengers’ bill of rights.

A spokesperson for Transport Minister Marc Garneau said the tarmac delay rule was decided “based on operational realities and international best practices. For example, in the United States, air carriers are required to offer the option to disembark after a three hour delay on domestic flights, and a four hour delay on international flights.”

While airlines frequently blame weather for flight delays, data from the U.S. federal government shows that extreme weather events are responsible for fewer than 5 per cent of flight delays in the U.S. The most common reason for delays was late-arriving aircraft, meaning flights delayed because earlier flights were delayed. This accounted for nearly 42 per cent of U.S. delays. Canada does not currently keep track of this type of data.

But Lukacs points out that Canada has much harsher weather than most of the U.S., so it may not be a fair comparison. And Toronto’s worst-in-the-country Billy Bishop Airport has unique issues to deal with because it’s on an island.

“This may be an apples to oranges comparison,” he told HuffPost Canada by phone.

Nonetheless, Canada’s poor weather doesn’t explain why Alaska Airlines has a higher on-time percentage than any Canadian airline (80.7 per cent) and is the third best among U.S. airlines.

Lukacs argues these on-time rankings are incomplete: There isn’t enough data to determine, for instance, whether it’s a particular airport or a particular airline that’s behind delays in a given place.

Either way, airlines should be taking bad weather into account when planning their schedules, Lukacs said.

“If airlines and airports ignore the weather realities, then you have guaranteed, built-in failure,” he said.

Air Canada to Launch Daily Non-Stop, Year-Round Calgary-Terrace Service; Increases Capacity on Key Regional Routes

News provided by Air Canada/CNW

  • New Terrace route and added capacity supports economic growth in Skeena Valley area
  • Capacity increasing for Vancouver Island, Northern BC, BC Interior, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Yukon, Winnipegroutes

MONTREAL, July 3, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Canada today announced it will launch daily non-stop, year-round flights between Calgary and Terrace beginning Oct. 28, 2019, which will complement the airline’s five times daily flights between Vancouver and Terrace.  Air Canada is also increasing capacity on key regional routes across Western Canada this winter with its flexible fleet including continued deployment of the popular Bombardier Q-400 aircraft.

“We are very pleased to add a new route linking Northern BC with our Calgary hub this fall in response to economic growth in the Skeena Valley area.  The new daily, non-stop flights between Terrace and Calgary will not only offer convenient flight options in response to travel demand between these two respective areas, but also the choice of another hub where easy connections to and from our extensive network are available.  Further, with significant development projects underway in the Terrace-Kitimat area, we are also strategically boosting capacity on our Vancouver-Terrace route this winter with five daily flights. With these new schedule enhancements, Air Canada will offer the most flights and options to travel easily between Terrace-Kitimat and anywhere across North America and internationally,” said Mark Galardo, Vice President, Network Planning at Air Canada.

“We have also increased capacity this winter in several other regional markets in Western Canada. Following the introduction of more comfortable, fuel efficient and faster Q-400 aircraft earlier this year, we will continue deploying the aircraft this winter to the BC Interior, Northern BC, Vancouver Island and Northern Alberta communities, providing more seats and optimizing the most connections between our extensive regional and global markets.”

“And finally with Air Canada’s varied and flexible fleet, this fall and winter, we are also pleased to add capacity on our Whitehorse, Saskatchewan and Winnipeg routes with larger Airbus A319/A320 and CRJ-900 aircraft. Customers on these services can take advantage of our Business Class and wi-fi options,” concluded Mark.

“The Airport Society is thrilled to have another route added to our business schedule. Air Canada has been a valued partner in helping us create the true regional airport. We look forward to growing with them in our region,” said Terrace-Kitimat Airport Society President Gary MacCarthy.

Increased services across Western Canada regional markets this fall and winter peak compared to last year include:

RouteFrequencies & Aircraft*Capacity Increase
Calgary-TerraceDaily with Q-400snew
Vancouver-Terrace5 x daily with Q-400s+30%
Vancouver-Prince Rupert2 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-Smithers2 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-Fort St. John4 x daily with Q-400s+20%
Vancouver-Kamloops5 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-Penticton3 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-Comox3 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-SandspitDaily with Q-400s+56%
Vancouver-Saskatoon3 daily with CRJ900s offering Business and Economy Class+44%
Vancouver-Regina3 daily with CRJ900s offering Business and Economy Class+44%
Vancouver-Whitehorse2 x daily with A319s/A320s offering Business and Economy Class+24%
Calgary-Kamloops2 x daily with Q-400s+56%
Calgary-Winnipeg3 x daily with A319s/CRJ900s offering Business and Economy Class+40%
Edmonton-Fort McMurray3 x daily with Q-400s+70%
Edmonton-Grande Prairie2 x daily with Q-400s+56%
*Detailed schedules are available at aircanada.com

All flights are scheduled to provide convenient, point-to-point travel, as well as easy connections to Air Canada’s extensive domestic, US and international network at Vancouver and Calgary.  Customers also collect and redeem Aeroplan Miles through Canada’s leading loyalty program when travelling with Air Canada, and eligible customers have access to priority check-in, Maple Leaf Lounges at main airports, priority boarding and other benefits.

Flair Airlines announces 2019/2020 winter schedule

Provided by Flair Airline/Globe Newswire

Edmonton, July 02, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) —

Flair Airlines announced its 2019/2020 winter schedule with low fare service out of seven Canadian gateways; Abbotsford, Vancouver, Kelowna, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg and Toronto’s Pearson International.  

Jim Scott, Flair’s CEO commented, “As Canada’s only independent low fare airline, our new winter schedule will bring more and more Canadians together right across the country. With over a million passengers flown in the last year, we are quietly building a very loyal group of ‘Flair Flyers’.”

Commencing on October 27th the new winter schedule sees a continuation of Flair’s recently introduced and highly competitive daily non-stop services from Toronto (YYZ) to both Vancouver (YVR) and Calgary (YYC). At its winter peak, Flair will operate some 146 flights per week utilizing its fleet which includes both Boeing 737-800s and 737-400s.

Flair’s 2019/2020 winter schedule from Oct. 27, 2019 – Mar. 27, 2020 features: 

From EdmontonWeekly DeparturesDays
to Kelowna4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri
to Vancouver10Daily
to Abbotsford5Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat
to Toronto (Pearson)7Daily
   
From Toronto (Pearson)Weekly DeparturesDays
to Edmonton7Daily
to Vancouver7Daily
to Winnipeg4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri
to Calgary7Daily
   
From CalgaryWeekly DeparturesDays
to Vancouver7Daily
to Winnipeg4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri
to Abbotsford7Daily
to Toronto (Pearson)7Daily
   
From VancouverWeekly DeparturesDays
to Edmonton10Daily
to Calgary7Daily
to Toronto (Pearson)7Daily
   
From AbbotsfordWeekly DeparturesDays
to Edmonton5Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat
to Calgary7Daily
   
From WinnipegWeekly DeparturesDays
to Calgary4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri
to Toronto (Pearson)4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri
   
From KelownaWeekly DeparturesDays
to Edmonton4Sun, Mon, Thu, Fri

Note: additional frequencies will be available during the holiday season.

For more on Flair’s 2019/2020 schedule, please visit https://flyflair.com/travel-info/schedule/

‘I was panicking’: More passengers ask for help following Sunwing flight cancellations

News provided by CBC News – link to full story – with a hint from P.N.

Airline says it will compensate affected passengers who rebooked on other airlines

By Sophia Harris · CBC News · Posted: Jul 01, 2019

The Canadian Transportation Agency received 46 complaints involving Sunwing flight cancellations between May 1 and June 25. (Christopher Katsarov/The Canadian Press)

Sunwing said on Friday it will compensate passengers who had to pay extra to rebook on other airlines after the carrier cancelled a spate of flights in May and June. 

The flight cancellations sparked anger and frustration, with a total of 46 passengers filing complaints with the Canadian Transportation Agency.

Twenty-three of the complaints involved cancelled flights between Toronto and Vancouver. Those cases, plus three others, were connected to the grounding of Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft, the CTA said. It didn’t provide details for the remaining 20 cases. 

CBC first reported on the flight cancellations in May when a family of 10 requested help after Sunwing cancelled their flight from Toronto to their home of Vancouver, with just four days’ notice. The family said the airline offered to fly them home nine days after their original departure date. 

After being contacted by CBC, Sunwing flew the family home on time on a different airline. 

Following that story, CBC received more than 20 complaints from other Sunwing passengers. Many plead for help, saying the airline also cancelled their flights on short notice, leaving them with untenable options, such as a new flight on a different date or a refund on tickets that, if rebooked now for the same date, would cost much more on another airline.

Many of the passengers who contacted CBC News didn’t file a complaint with the CTA, saying they didn’t know that was an option. That includes Laryssa Gorecki, who said Sunwing gave her five days’ notice it had cancelled her round-trip flight from Toronto to Vancouver, set to depart on June 1. 

“I was panicking,” said the Toronto high school teacher, who was headed to Vancouver to make a presentation at a national conference for educators. 

Laryssa Gorecki is shown in Vancouver, where she attended an educators conference. Because Sunwing cancelled her flight to the West Coast city, she spend an extra $590 to rebook on another airline. (Submitted by Laryssa Gorecki)

Gorecki said Sunwing only offered her a refund or an alternate flight on unsuitable dates. In desperation, she rebooked on another airline, paying an extra $590 — on top of her refund — for a last-minute flight.

“I didn’t have a choice,” she said, calling her experience with Sunwing disappointing. “They’re unreliable, irresponsible, and it just left a really bad taste in my mouth.”

Larry Peloso, left, and his husband, Andy Neilson, wait at a smaller airport in London, Ont., for their flight to B.C. (Submitted by Larry Peloso)

Fellow Torontonian Larry Peloso is also upset over his experience with Sunwing. He and his husband booked a round-trip flight from Toronto to Vancouver, departing on May 31, to attend his nephew’s wedding.

Peloso said the airline informed him eight days before departure that the couple’s flights were cancelled, and offered to rebook them on unworkable dates. 

“I booked this in February, and for them to call me at the end of May just seemed to me to be very bad [customer service],” he said. 

Peloso begrudgingly took a refund and, to avoid incurring added costs for last-minute flights, rebooked their trip on an ultra-low-cost carrier that flies out of smaller airports outside of Toronto and Vancouver. The new flights added about six hours’ driving time to the itinerary, which meant the couple had to each take an extra day off work, rent a car and rearrange some of their other travel plans.

“We sort of made the best of a bad situation. And as far as I’m concerned, Sunwing washed their hands of the entire thing,” said Peloso. “They lost a customer and lost a lot of goodwill.”

Why the cancellations?

In its response to CBC News, Sunwing implied that the 737 Max groundings were behind all of its recent flight cancellations. The airline didn’t specify how many passengers or flights were affected.

A number of airlines grounded their Max fleet in mid-March following two fatal crashes involving the model. Sunwing has four 737 Max planes, which make up less than 10 per cent of its fleet.

To avoid disruptions, the airline said it hired third-party carriers to replace its grounded aircraft — but this solution suddenly hit a snag. 

“Unfortunately, we were not able to source additional flying capacity to cover all our routes this summer and did need to make some cancellations in late May,” said Sunwing spokesperson Jacqueline Grossman in an email. 

“This was unforeseen at the time of accepting reservations for our summer program and while regrettable, it was beyond the control of the company.”

The airline said it made every effort to contact affected passengers in a timely manner and initially offered them the option of a refund or a flight on an alternate date.

Sunwing said it later modified its policy to offer affected passengers with departures in July and onward flights on other airlines on their original travel dates, at no extra cost.

“Customer satisfaction is of paramount importance to us and we sincerely regret the inconvenience that our customers experienced,” said Grossman. 

What about the other passengers?

Following a second CBC inquiry, Sunwing said that passengers with departure dates before July who rebooked on other airlines at an added expense will be reimbursed. 

The airline also said it would contact Laryssa Gorecki to refund her the extra money she paid out of pocket to rebook her flight. 

“It was a bumpy road but I’m just happy that they’re coming through with it,” Gorecki said. 

Peloso is less excited about the news, as he doubts he’ll be compensated for having to take an extra day off work or for the hours he spent driving to out-of-town airports. “It’s sort of too little, too late.”

Affected Sunwing passengers who believe they’re entitled to compensation can submit receipts and fill out a post-travel complaint form on Sunwing’s website

Engine failure on Air Canada flight leads to emergency landing at YVR

News provided by Vancouver Sun – link to full story

Flight AC 538 departed Vancouver International Airport at 1:10 p.m. Sunday and was scheduled to make a three-hour flight to Anchorage, according to flight records.

STEPHANIE IP & DAVID CARRIGG, Vancouver Sun – Updated: June 23, 2019

An Air Canada flight bound for Anchorage, Alaska on Sunday was delayed when it made an emergency landing in Vancouver. FRANCIS GEORGIAN / PNG

An Air Canada flight bound from Vancouver to Anchorage, Alaska, returned mid-flight on Sunday after an engine loss.

Flight AC 538 departed Vancouver International Airport at 1:10 p.m. Sunday and was scheduled to make a three-hour flight to Anchorage, according to flight records.

Just over halfway into the trip, the flight turned around and requested an emergency landing at YVR.

YVR spokeswoman Andrea Pham confirmed the flight landed safely.

In a prepared statement, Air Canada said the flight had 112 passengers and had returned to Vancouver after an engine shutdown.

“Aircraft are designed to fly on one engine and our pilots are trained for such situations,” the airline said.

Flight Aware shows that the plane, an A320 aircraft, touched down around 3:06 p.m. in Vancouver.

sip@postmedia.com