Tag: Boeing 737 MAX

FAA has no ‘timetable’ for Boeing 737 Max’s return to the skies

News provided by The Globe and Mail/Reuters – Link

12 June 2019 by David Shepardson and Rachit Vats – REUTERS

The Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday it does not have a specific timetable on when Boeing Co.’s troubled 737 Max jet would return to service after two fatal crashes led to the airplane’s worldwide grounding in March.

FAA spokesman Greg Martin said the agency has “no timetable” for allowing the 737 Max to resume flying and will act “only when it is safe to return to service.”

Bloomberg reported earlier that the troubled 737 Max aircraft will be back in the air by December, citing a top FAA safety official.

Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment, and has not given a timeline on when the planes would be back in service.

Boeing is not expected to submit its formal software fix to the FAA this week or conduct a certification test flight that is required before it can submit the fix and training upgrade for approval, two people briefed on the matter said.

A battered aviation industry has been speculating on when Boeing will win regulators’ approval to put the plane back in the air along with a batch of software upgrades and training.

American Airlines Group Inc. said on Sunday it was extending cancellations of about 115 daily flights into September due to the grounding of the 737 Max.

WestJet suspends Halifax-Paris, other routes, to deal with 737 Max grounding

News provided by CityNews1130.com/The Canadian Press

By The Canadian Press | Posted Apr 28, 2019

CALGARY — WestJet Airlines Ltd. has announced cancellations and schedule changes on some of its routes as the airline deals with the continued grounding of Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

Credit to Chris Cavalier ©2019 Copyright C-GZSG 737 Max 8 Westjet – Stored due to grounding

Flights between Halifax and Paris have been suspended from June 3 through Aug. 2, and WestJet says guests will be rebooked either through Calgary, non-stop on its Boeing Dreamliner jets to Paris, or with one of its partner airlines through Toronto, Montreal or New York.

Flights between Edmonton and Ottawa, and Edmonton and Montreal, have also been suspended for most of June, and WestJet says guests will be rebooked through either Calgary or Toronto on WestJet-operated flights.

Service between Toronto and Kelowna, B.C., and Vancouver and Regina will also be suspended for much of June.

Transport Canada banned the 737 Max from Canadian airspace as part of an international response to the fatal March 10 crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane.

WestJet says in a news release that it has adjusted flight times on some routes or substituted larger aircraft with fewer flights, but that it needed to suspend a small number of routes where no alternative aircraft were available.

“Although the Max comprised over 1,000 monthly departures in our June schedules, by adjusting our aircraft lease returns and the planned installations of our premium seats, we have been able to cover more than 700 of the flight routes where the Max was originally scheduled, with other aircraft,” Chief Operating Officer Jeff Martin said Sunday in a post on the company’s website. ADVERTISING

“I thank our WestJet teams for their dedication as they continue to work hard to get our guests to their destinations.”

Martin said WestJet remains committed to the routes and will resume flights when it can.

Transport Minister Marc Garneau closed Canadian skies to the Max 8 on March 13 over safety concerns arising from the flight path of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 that bore startling parallels to a fatal Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia on Oct. 29, killing a combined 346 people.

WestJet had 13 Max 8s in operation when the planes were pulled from service, but has said it has no plans to cancel orders for 37 more Max jetliners.

Air Canada — where 24 Max 8s make up about 10 per cent of its main 243-plane fleet — said last week that the company has “protected 96 per cent of planned flying” through measures that include consolidating flights on larger planes and extending leases on aircraft planned to exit the fleet.

Companies in this story: (TSX:AC, TSX:WJA)

The Canadian Press

Air Canada Updates Schedule Through July in Response to Ongoing Grounding of Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft

Provided by Air Canada/CNW

  • Mitigation plans include aircraft substitutions, consolidating schedule frequencies, finalizing arrangements for additional capacity through new and extended aircraft leases, accelerating intake of aircraft
  • 737 MAX removed until August 1 for planning certainty

MONTREAL, April 25, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Canada said today that to provide customers greater certainty for their summer travel plans it has further adjusted its schedule through to August 1 and taken other measures, including obtaining additional capacity, so that customers can book with full confidence. The changes are in response to the continued grounding by Transport Canada of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, which has now been removed from Air Canada’s schedule until August 1.

Credit to F. K. (Ted) Larkin © 2019 Copyright
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“With the continued grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, Air Canada is prudently adjusting its schedule and is finalizing arrangements for additional aircraft to transport customers to their destinations. Through these measures, we are giving customers certainty to book their summer travel plans on Air Canada with full confidence. We understand the importance our customers attach to their summer travel and through the actions we are announcing today, Air Canada now has in place a schedule and the capacity to meet travellers’ needs,” said Lucie Guillemette, Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer at Air Canada.

“Since the Boeing 737 MAX fleet was grounded on March 13, Air Canada has successfully protected 96 per cent of planned flying through strategic commercial adjustments. This includes optimizing the current fleet, consolidating flights on larger aircraft and extending leases on aircraft planned to exit the fleet.  By leveraging our deep, global network and through arrangements with Star Alliance partner Lufthansa and other airlines to provide capacity, we now have secured sufficient additional capacity to meet our customers’ travel needs this summer,” said Ms. Guillemette.

In compliance with a safety notice closing Canadian airspace issued by Transport Canada on March 13, 2019, Air Canada grounded its fleet of 24 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. Boeing has advised that deliveries of its 737 MAX are currently suspended. Air Canada was expecting to receive another 12 aircraft for a total fleet of 36 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in July.

As the timeline for the return to service of the 737 MAX is unknown, for planning purposes and to provide customers certainty for booking and travel, Air Canada has now removed 737 MAX flying from its schedule until at least August 1, 2019. Final decisions on returning the 737 MAX to service will be based on Air Canada’s safety assessment following the lifting of government safety notices and approval by international regulatory authorities.

A full summary of schedule adjustments is posted on aircanada.com . Highlights of measures taken by Air Canada include:

Mitigations

To mitigate the impact, Air Canada has substituted different aircraft on 737 MAX routes, including flying routes with similar-sized or larger aircraft. To help provide this replacement flying, the carrier has extended leases for three Airbus A320 and three Embraer 190 aircraft which were scheduled to exit the fleet.

Air Canada is also accelerating the in-take of six Airbus A321 aircraft from WOW Air into its fleet. For customer comfort, the first four of these aircraft, despite being less than three years old, are being reconfigured, equipped with Wi-Fi and repainted in Air Canada Rouge livery and will begin entering the fleet in May, a month earlier than scheduled. The remaining two will enter service later.

Working with Other Airlines

The carrier is working with other airlines to provide immediate extra capacity and provide alternative options to customers. Air Canada’s Montreal-Frankfurt flight for the month of May will be operated by Star Alliance partner Lufthansa.

Air Canada is now finalizing capacity agreements with other airlines to temporarily operate flights on its behalf, subject to government approvals and conclusion of final documentation. Beginning June 15, Qatar Airways will operate one Airbus A330-200 on daily flights between Montreal and Barcelona and one Airbus A330-200 daily flight between Montreal and Paris. Beginning June 2, Omni Air International will operate flights with one Boeing 767-200ER aircraft between Vancouver and Honolulu and Maui.

Schedule Changes until July 31

The airline has implemented a number of route changes to date, either adjusting operating days and times, substituting larger aircraft with fewer frequencies, or re-deploying Air Canada Rouge aircraft on additional routes. For example, Air Canada’s Montreal-Bordeaux flights will be operated three times weekly with Air Canada Rouge Boeing 767-300ER aircraft, Montreal Los Angeles will operate once daily with larger Airbus A330 aircraft, Toronto and Montreal flights to Keflavik will operate with Air Canada Rouge A319s, and one of two daily flights between Toronto-Charlottetown will be operated with an all-Economy Air Canada Rouge Airbus A321, among other adjustments.

Some seasonal route launches have been delayed. This includes the new Montreal-Bordeaux seasonal route that will begin July 1 instead of June 15, and the seasonal Vancouver-Boston route which will commence June 20 instead of June 1.   

Route Suspensions

In a small number of cases, Air Canada has temporarily suspended service on certain 737 MAX routes where alternative aircraft are not presently available. This includes flights from Halifax and St. John’s to London Heathrow, for which it is re-accommodating customers over its Toronto and Montreal hubs. While these flights are suspended to July 31, Air Canada remains fully committed to these routes.

Other seasonal non-stop routes such as Toronto-Shannon, Toronto-Abbotsford and Calgary-London, ON are being suspended for the 2019 summer season to optimize Air Canada’s entire fleet throughout the schedule. Customers will be re-accommodated on alternate flights.  Air Canada plans to resume these routes in the 2020 summer season.

Customer Information

As changes are finalized in the flight schedule, customers whose flight times or flight numbers have changed can expect to receive an email detailing their updated itinerary. This information is also available in My Bookings on the Air Canada app or Air Canada website. Customers are advised, whether they have booked directly through Air Canada or not, to ensure their contact information is on their booking to facilitate communication of any flight changes.

Air Canada has put in place a flexible rebooking policy with full fee waiver and a refund option for affected customers. Customers originally scheduled to travel on a 737 MAX can call Air Canada at 1-833-354-5963 for information within 72 hours of their planned flight. Customers who have booked flights through a Travel Agent should contact them for immediate assistance.

Customers are further advised to check the status of their flight using the Flight Status function on the Air Canada app or on aircanada.com prior to going to the airport.

Additional information is on aircanada.com

Additional information, including specific route changes for the July schedule as a result of the 737 MAX operation is provided at the special page, Update on flights operated by the Boeing 737 MAX, available on aircanada.com that will be updated as warranted.  The current summary of schedule changes is available under the first question, “What is Air Canada doing to reschedule customers”.

Nine aviation agencies will have seat on FAA’s Max review panel

News provided by FlightGlobal.com

19 APRIL, 2019 | BY: JON HEMMERDINGER | BOSTON

Representatives from at least nine countries and regions will participate in a panel that the US Federal Aviation Administration convened for the purpose of reviewing the Boeing 737 Max’s flight control software.

Led by veteran US transportation safety investigator Chris Hart, the FAA’s “Joint Authorities Technical Review” panel (JATR) will first convene on 29 April, says the FAA on 19 April.

The group will likely conclude its review in 90 days, adds the FAA, signaling the 737 Max’s grounding might not lift until the second half of the year.

The non-US representatives include “experts” from civil aviation authorities, including those overseeing airlines that have already received, or have orders for, Boeing 737 Max.

Delegates hail from the aviation agencies of Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, Japan, Indonesia, Singapore and United Arab Emirates.

“The JATR team will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircraft’s automated flight control system,” says the FAA. “The team will evaluate aspects of the 737 Max automated flight control system, including its design and pilots’ interaction with the system, to determine its compliance with all applicable regulations and to identify future enhancements that might be needed.”

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Boeing

The FAA established the technical review panel earlier this month, making Hart its chair.

Hart has been a National Transportation Safety Board member for roughly 11 years in two stints since 1990. He was NTSB chair from 2015 to 2017.

Additionally, Hart was deputy administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and worked at the FAA as assistant administrator for system safety and deputy director for air traffic safety oversight.

Other US members of the review panel include representatives from the FAA and NASA.

The FAA did not immediately respond to a request to disclose names of panelists other than Hart.

Garneau calls for flight simulators before Max 8s can return to Canadian skies

News provided by TravelWeek.ca/The Canadian Press

Garneau calls for flight simulators before Max 8s can return to Canadian skies

Thursday, April 18, 2019 | By: The Canadian Press

MONTREAL — Transport Minister Marc Garneau says airlines hoping to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8 in Canadian airspace must first train their pilots using a flight simulator.

The call goes further than recommendations from U.S. regulators as training procedures for the grounded plane come under continued scrutiny following two deadly crashes.

“Simulators are the very best way, from a training point of view, to go over exactly what could happen in a real way and to react properly to it,” Garneau said.

“It’s part of it – the software fixes… and the training itself, which in my mind requires simulation time,” he said at an event in Montreal Wednesday.

Garneau’s comments highlight the potential hurdles to landing on a common set of standards and getting the Max 8 back into the air.

Until recently, most U.S. airlines did not require flight simulation for pilots of the Max 8, which aviation authorities across the globe grounded in the wake of the deadly Ethiopian Airlines tragedy on March 10. The Wall Street Journal reported this week that American Airlines will start to use flight simulators, a significant shift.

“As a result of the continuing investigation into both aircraft accidents, we are looking at the potential for additional training opportunities in co-ordination with the FAA and Allied Pilots Association,” American Airlines said in an email Wednesday.

On Tuesday, however, a panel appointed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said pilots will not need new training on flight simulators to learn how to operate the Boeing jet. The group said in a draft report that computer and classroom instruction about new anti-stall software should be adequate for pilots who have flown earlier versions of the 737.

Garneau said he feels “strongly about simulators,” stressing their effectiveness and drawing on his experience as an astronaut.

“From our point of view, it’s not going to be a question of pulling out an iPad and spending an hour on it,” he added, referencing an American Airlines pilots union statement that pilots who were already qualified for Boeing 737-800s took a one-hour, iPad-based training program to fly the Max 8.

Garneau closed Canadian skies to the Max 8 last month over safety concerns arising from the erratic flight path of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 that bore startling parallels to a fatal Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia on Oct. 29.

The two flights, both on Max 8s, killed a total of 346 people, including 18 Canadians on board the Ethiopian Airlines flight.

The global grounding of more than 375 Max 8s has impacted scores of airlines, including Air Canada, WestJet Airlines Inc. and Sunwing Airlines Inc.

Air Canada – where 24 Max 8s make up about 10 per cent of its main 243-plane fleet – froze its sunny 2019 financial guidance last month “in light of the current uncertainty.” Older replacement aircraft such as the Airbus A320 are not as fuel efficient and others can only avoid maintenance for so long before heading back to the hangar, further reducing capacity.

Garneau’s remarks came after an announcement highlighting new incentives to buy electric cars.

Starting next month, Canadians who buy or lease an eligible electric or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle will get $5,000 off the purchase, Garneau said. Shorter-range plug-in hybrid cars come with a $2,500 incentive.

The minister said Transport Canada is working out the logistics of the discount “at lightning speed,” with plans on how to dole it out still uncertain as the clock ticks down to May 1.

The 2019 budget set aside $300 million for the federal purchase incentive.

Air Canada pilots review Boeing 737 MAX systems amid global flight ban

News provided by Global News/Reuters

18 April 2019 | By Staff & Reuters

Air Canada said on Thursday its Boeing Co 737 MAX pilots were reviewing aircraft systems and alternative flight conditions for the grounded planes, and the carrier would decide on further training pending final recommendations from regulators.

On Wednesday, Canadian Transport Minister Marc Garneau called for pilots to receive simulator training for Boeing’s new 737 MAX software, going beyond a draft report by a U.S. Federal Aviation Administration-appointed board, which recommended additional training without requiring a simulator.

F. K. (Ted) Larkin © 2019 Copyright

Boeing is working to deliver to global regulators a software update and new training proposals for the MAX following a Lion Air crash in Indonesia in October and an Ethiopian crash in March, which killed 346 people combined.

Boeing said on Wednesday it was making “steady progress” on the path to certifying the software update and had made the final test flight before a certification flight.

Air Canada said it was the only carrier in the United States and Canada with 737 MAX simulators. The country’s largest carrier said it was pleased to see the Canadian government take a “rigorous approach” in how it weighs its requirements for reintroducing the jets into service.

Air Canada’s rival, Westjet Airlines, declined to specifically address Garneau’s comments, but the carrier follows all Transport Canada recommendations, a company spokeswoman said by email.

© 2019 Reuters

Air Canada Updates Schedule for May in Response to Ongoing Grounding of the Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft

Provided by Air Canada/CNW

Revised schedule covers 98 per cent of flying previously done by 737 MAX

MONTREAL, April 2, 2019 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Canada said today that due to Transport Canada’s continued closure of Canadian airspace to the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, it has further adjusted its schedule through to May 31. The carrier anticipates it will cover 98 per cent of previously planned flying for the month through a series of mitigation measures, schedule changes and temporary route suspensions.

“Air Canada assures its customers that we are doing everything possible to mitigate the effects of the 737 MAX grounding, and we appreciate our customers’ patience and flexibility as we continue to work on transporting them safely to their destinations. By adjusting our schedule for the month of May, we are providing certainty for our customers so they can continue to book and travel with confidence on Air Canada,” said Lucie Guillemette, Executive Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer at Air Canada.

In compliance with the safety notice issued by Transport Canada on March 13, 2019, Air Canada grounded its fleet of 24 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. Boeing has advised that deliveries of its 737 MAX are currently suspended. Air Canada was expecting six new aircraft in March and April.

Air Canada is now updating its June schedule to optimize its fleet and re-accommodate customers. Because the timeline for the return to service of the 737 MAX is unknown, for planning purposes and to provide customers certainty for booking and travel, Air Canada has removed 737 MAX flying from its schedule until at least July 1, 2019. Final decisions on returning the 737 MAX to service will be based on Air Canada’s safety assessment following the lifting of government safety notices and approval by international regulatory authorities.

Among the measures taken by Air Canada:

Mitigations

To mitigate the impact, Air Canada has been substituting different aircraft on 737 MAX routes. This includes flying routes with similar-sized or larger aircraft. To help provide this replacement flying, the carrier has extended leases for aircraft which were scheduled to exit the fleet. Air Canada is also accelerating the in-take of recently acquired Airbus A321 aircraft from WOW Air into its fleet.

Working with our Partner Airlines

The carrier has worked with other carriers to provide immediate extra capacity and provide alternative options to passengers. For example, its Montreal-Frankfurt flight for the month of May will be operated by Star Alliance partner Lufthansa.

Schedule Changes until June 30

The airline has implemented a number of route changes to date, either changing operating times or substituting larger aircraft with fewer frequencies on routes operated more frequently by smaller aircraft. For example, beginning in May two daily flights between Toronto and Calgary have been consolidated onto one larger Airbus A330, leaving nine daily flights.

In some cases, seasonal route launches have been delayed. This includes: Toronto-Portland, which will now start July 1instead of May 24; Vancouver-Boston, which will now start June 16 instead of June 1; and Calgary-Halifax, which will now start July 1 instead of May 18. The seasonal start of the carrier’s Toronto-Shannon route and new Montreal-Bordeauxservice will both be delayed until early July.

In addition, selected frequencies on domestic routes such as Toronto-Edmonton, will be served by Air Canada Rouge aircraft.

Route Suspensions

In a small number of cases, Air Canada has temporarily suspended service on certain 737 MAX routes where alternative aircraft are not presently available. This includes flights from Halifax and St. John’s to London Heathrow, for which it is re-accommodating customers over its Toronto and Montreal hubs. These routes are now suspended to May 31, but Air Canada remains committed to these routes.

Customer Information

As changes are finalized in the flight schedule, customers whose flight times or flight numbers have changed can expect to receive an email detailing their updated itinerary. This information is also available in My Bookings on the Air Canada app or Air Canada website. Customers are advised, whether they have booked directly through Air Canada or not, to ensure their contact information is on their booking to facilitate communication of any flight changes.

Air Canada has put in place a flexible rebooking policy with full fee waiver and a refund option for affected customers. Customers originally scheduled to travel on a 737 MAX can call Air Canada at 1-833-354-5963 for information within 72 hours of their planned flight. Customers who have booked flights through a Travel Agent should contact them for immediate assistance.

Customers are further advised to check the status of their flight using the Flight Status function on the Air Canada app or on aircanada.com prior to going to the airport. Additional information, including specific changes to the April and May 737 MAX operation is provided at the special page, Update on flights operated by the Boeing 737 MAX, available on www.aircanada.com that will be updated as warranted.

Ottawa defends waiting to ground Boeing Max 8 even as flight data emerged online shortly after crash

News provided by The Globe and Mail

ERIC ATKINS TRANSPORTATION REPORTER UPDATED MARCH 18, 2019

Grounded Air Canada Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft are pictured at YVR airport in Vancouver, on March 13, 2019.BEN NELMS/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

The chart depicting the up-down-up flight path of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 was available to see on plane enthusiast blogs shortly after the Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed and killed all 157 passengers and crew near Addis Ababa on March 10, raising questions about the time it took governments in Canada and United States to ground the plane.

The speed and altitude of the doomed, six-minute flight was gathered from privately hosted receivers and turned into a gut-churning chart posted on the website Flightradar24. Observers quickly noted the similarities to an October crash of Lion Air 737 Max 8 near Jakarta that killed 189.

Within two days of the crash, dozens of countries – China, Britain and across continental Europe – grounded the two-year-old Boeing model, citing public safety and questions that needed to be answered by investigators of the two tragedies.

The swift reactions isolated Canada and the United States, where the jets continued to fly for at least another day.

David Gillen, a professor of transportation policy and management at the University of British Columbia and director of the Sauder Centre for Transportation Studies, called the delay “puzzling.” He speculated Ottawa was reluctant to ground a plane that is a key part of Air Canada’s fleet.

“They were going to take a real financial hit,” he said. “I think [Ottawa was] reluctant to [ground the planes] until it became apparent that they had no choice because of the public pressure.”

Transport Minister Marc Garneau announced the Canadian ban Wednesday at a press conference in Ottawa. He said he was taking the step based on new satellite-tracking information Transport Canada experts had reviewed on Wednesday morning. Virginia-based Aireon, a Nav Canada venture that provides satellite-based aircraft-tracking services to several global air-traffic authorities, supplied the data. An Aireon spokeswoman said Canada asked for and received the data Tuesday evening. The United States received the information on Monday.

“The new information, and I hasten to say this is new information that we received and analyzed this morning, comes from validated satellite tracking data suggesting a possible although unproven similarity in the flight profile of the Lion Air aircraft,” Mr. Garneau said in announcing the ban. “I caution that this new information is not conclusive and we must await further evidence hopefully from the voice and data recorders.”

He said there was no “political pressure” from the United States to delay any ban of the U.S.-made planes and there was no push-back from the Canadian airlines on the decision.

Hours after Mr. Garneau’s press conference, U.S. President Donald Trump said the United States was grounding the planes, also citing new information. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said the global ban “will remain in effect pending further investigation, including examination of information from the aircraft’s flight-data recorders and cockpit voice recorders.”

A Canadian government source who was granted anonymity by The Globe and Mail in order to speak freely said the Aireon data is seen as precise and trustworthy, and the government cannot make policy decisions based on crowd-sourced flight data.

“Transport Canada experts reviewed the latest available evidence from both protected and open sources from the time immediately following the accident up to the Minister of Transport’s decision to issue the safety notice on March 13, 2019,” Sau Sau Liu, a spokeswoman for Transport Canada, said in an e-mail. “Transport Canada analyzed data from Aireon and evidence from open-source reporting throughout their examination into this accident.”

The delay tied Canada to a slow-footed response in the United States that has been criticized as overly sympathetic to a big U.S. company while endangering lives.

The big U.S. airlines and the two major Canadian carriers account for more than 100 of the world’s 371-strong Max fleet, not including Canada’s Sunwing Airlines, which has four. This has added to the perception the slow response was an attempt to protect the airlines, not travellers or people on the ground.

The data used to generate the chart on Flightradar24 was collected from receivers deployed by users of the enthusiasts’ website in return for free access. Ian Petchenik, a spokesman for Flightradar24, said he has not seen the official flight data collected by Aireon, but his company’s is based on the same airplane broadcasts.

Since the planes were grounded, both airlines have scrambled to rebook thousands of passengers a day. WestJet on Monday suspended its financial guidance for 2019 after parking the planes that account for about 12 per cent of its March seat capacity. Air Canada issued a similar warning Friday amid questions over how the loss of 7 per cent of its seat capacity will affect profits and operations.

On Monday, Mr. Garneau told reporters in Ottawa that Canadian pilots of the 737 underwent additional training after the Lion Air incident highlighted possible problems with the plane. He also said Transport Canada is re-examining the validation it gave the Max jets, following reports of a U.S. probe into the aircraft’s certification by the FAA.

Canada accepted the FAA’s March, 2017, certification of the Max under a deal in which such U.S. approvals are accepted by Canada and vice versa.

“We may not change anything but we’ve decided it’s a good idea for us to review the validation of the type certificate that was given for the Max 8,” Mr. Garneau said.

-With files from Reuters

Letter from Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg to Airlines, Passengers and the Aviation Community

Provided by Boeing/CNW

CHICAGO, March 18, 2019 /CNW/ —

We know lives depend on the work we do, and our teams embrace that responsibility with a deep sense of commitment every day. Our purpose at Boeing is to bring family, friends and loved ones together with our commercial airplanes—safely. The tragic losses of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and Lion Air Flight 610 affect us all, uniting people and nations in shared grief for all those in mourning. Our hearts are heavy, and we continue to extend our deepest sympathies to the loved ones of the passengers and crew on board.

Boeing Chairman, President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg recorded a video message from Boeing Headquarters in Chicago on March 18, 2019, to address airlines, passengers and the aviation community.
Boeing Chairman, President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg recorded a video message from Boeing Headquarters in Chicago on March 18, 2019, to address airlines, passengers and the aviation community.

Safety is at the core of who we are at Boeing, and ensuring safe and reliable travel on our airplanes is an enduring value and our absolute commitment to everyone. This overarching focus on safety spans and binds together our entire global aerospace industry and communities. We’re united with our airline customers, international regulators and government authorities in our efforts to support the most recent investigation, understand the facts of what happened and help prevent future tragedies. Based on facts from the Lion Air Flight 610 accident and emerging data as it becomes available from the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 accident, we’re taking actions to fully ensure the safety of the 737 MAX. We also understand and regret the challenges for our customers and the flying public caused by the fleet’s grounding.

Work is progressing thoroughly and rapidly to learn more about the Ethiopian Airlines accident and understand the information from the airplane’s cockpit voice and flight data recorders. Our team is on-site with investigators to support the investigation and provide technical expertise. The Ethiopia Accident Investigation Bureau will determine when and how it’s appropriate to release additional details.

Boeing has been in the business of aviation safety for more than 100 years, and we’ll continue providing the best products, training and support to our global airline customers and pilots. This is an ongoing and relentless commitment to make safe airplanes even safer. Soon we’ll release a software update and related pilot training for the 737 MAX that will address concerns discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident. We’ve been working in full cooperation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the Department of Transportation and the National Transportation Safety Board on all issues relating to both the Lion Air and the Ethiopian Airlines accidents since the Lion Air accident occurred in October last year.

Our entire team is devoted to the quality and safety of the aircraft we design, produce and support. I’ve dedicated my entire career to Boeing, working shoulder to shoulder with our amazing people and customers for more than three decades, and I personally share their deep sense of commitment. Recently, I spent time with our team members at our 737 production facility in Renton, Wash., and once again saw firsthand the pride our people feel in their work and the pain we’re all experiencing in light of these tragedies. The importance of our work demands the utmost integrity and excellence—that’s what I see in our team, and we’ll never rest in pursuit of it.  

Our mission is to connect people and nations, protect freedom, explore our world and the vastness of space, and inspire the next generation of aerospace dreamers and doers—and we’ll fulfill that mission only by upholding and living our values. That’s what safety means to us. Together, we’ll keep working to earn and keep the trust people have placed in Boeing.

Dennis Muilenburg
Chairman, President and CEO
The Boeing Company 

SOURCE Boeing

WestJet suspends 2019 financial guidance in light of Boeing 737 MAX grounding

Provided by WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership/CNW

CALGARY, March 18, 2019 /CNW/ – Today WestJet announced that following Transport Canada’s safety notice closing Canadian airspace to Boeing 737 MAX aircraft until further notice, the Federal Aviation Administration’s temporary grounding order and Boeing’s decision to suspend all MAX deliveries to airline customers, it is suspending all 2019 financial guidance provided on December 4, 2018 and February 5, 2019. The financial guidance provided with respect to earnings per share (EPS), return on invested capital (ROIC) and cumulative free-cash flow over the period of 2020-2022 remains in place until further information is known.

Through proactive planning and preparation for a variety of scenarios, including grounding, WestJet enacted its contingency plan immediately and grounded all thirteen of its MAX aircraft within 55 minutes of Transport Canada’s order with only three MAX aircraft outside of its Canadian jurisdiction. WestJet continues to implement and execute its contingency plan to minimize guest disruption and any financial impact. For the remainder of the first quarter WestJet expects it will be able to protect approximately 86 per cent of guests booked on MAX flights and cover approximately 75 per cent of the flights that were intended to operate on the MAX with other aircraft.