Westjet Cargo Announces Dedicated Freighters to Better Serve Canada

CALGARY, AB, June 23, 2021 /CNW/ – WestJet today announced that it is launching a new dedicated cargo service, using 737-800 Boeing Converted Freights (BCF), as dedicated aircraft, to fulfill the larger-scale needs of Canadian businesses, freight forwarders, shippers and individual customers. The first of these dedicated 737-800BCFs are expected to be in service by the second quarter of 2022.

(CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)
(CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)

“Our new dedicated commercial cargo aircraft are a natural evolution of the competitive guest services WestJet has successfully provided over our 25-year history. It will provide cargo customers with the reliable on-time performance and competitive cost advantage synonymous with WestJet,” said Charles Duncan, WestJet, Executive Vice-President, Cargo and President, Swoop.

Throughout 2022, WestJet Cargo will grow its fleet of 737-800BCFs, to work in tandem with the current offering of WestJet’s existing Cargo business. The 737-800 narrow body aircraft is quick to load and fly, enabling WestJet Cargo to offer greater fuel efficiency, flexibility and frequency for its customers. WestJet Cargo routes and scheduled services will accommodate the diverse needs of cargo customers using WestJet’s existing network and highly skilled 737 pilots.

“WestJet Cargo will enhance economic benefits through competitive product for shippers as well as new employment opportunities,” continued Duncan. “Dedicated, cost efficient and nimble narrow body freighters will make WestJet Cargo a dynamic and strong competitor.”

WestJet Cargo’s ability to ship on dedicated freighters or in the cargo hold on commercial routes provides cargo customers with increased reliability, flexibility and capacity to transport their diverse shipments to their chosen destination.

“Since our inception, 25 years ago, our collective goal at WestJet has been to provide competitive prices and superior service levels,” said Ed Sims, WestJet, President and CEO. “As we launch our dedicated cargo service, into a market that maintains an even greater need for competitive choice than what we saw in 1996, it is our commitment to provide customers with more choice, decreased costs and exceptional customer service.”

As WestJet Cargo expands, so too, will its team, network and flight plans. To learn more about how WestJet Cargo can fulfill shipping needs, or to discover incredible employment opportunities, visit WestJet Cargo.

About WestJet 

In 25 years of serving Canadians, WestJet has cut airfares in half and increased the flying population in Canada to more than 50 per cent. WestJet launched in 1996 with three aircraft, 250 employees and five destinations, growing over the years to more than 180 aircraft, 14,000 employees and more than 100 destinations in 23 countries, pre-pandemic.

Since the start of the pandemic the WestJet Group of Companies has built a layered framework of safety measures to ensure Canadians can continue to travel safely and responsibly through the airline’s Safety Above All hygiene program. During this time, WestJet has maintained its status as one of the top-10 on-time airlines in North America as named by Cirium.

What Airlines Still Fly Boeing 737 Combis? Canada istopping the list!

From Simple Flying – link to source story

by Linnea Ahlgren | May 25, 2021

While the past year has seen the rise of the ‘preighter’, cargo-passenger combination aircraft have slowly declined. With a history spanning over half a century, how many Boeing 737 Combi airplanes are still active in the skies today?

Air Inuit 737 Combi
Most civilian 737 Combis still in operation are flying to remote locations in the north of Canada. Photo: BriYYZ via Wikimedia Commons

The Boeing 737 was the world’s best-selling aircraft for decades before the Airbus A320 overtook it in total orders in November 2019. It was the first commercial jet ever to surpass the 10,000 milestone in 2012, and as of April 2021, Boeing had received a total of 14,693 orders for the 737 family.

Boeing also offered a few of its versions in a combi variant. The plane maker produced a total of 125 of the 737-200C, 737-300C, 737-400C, and eventually the 737-700C. However, only a handful of operators of the Boeing 737 Combi remain.

Government missions

According to data retrieved from the ch-aviation database, 13 carriers are operating a total of 36 active Boeing 737 Combi aircraft. Nearly half of these, all 737-700Cs, are the military version known as the Boeing C-40 Clipper and operated by the United States Navy.

Another two, both Boeing 737-400Cs approaching 32 years old, are in the care of the United States National Nuclear Security Administration, a federal agency ‘responsible for safeguarding national security through the military application of nuclear science’.

Chrono Aviation 737 Combi
Chrono Aviation operates a 737-200C. Photo: Airline12 via Wikimedia Commons

Canada topping the list

The remaining 19 Boeing 737 Combis are in service with carriers operating in remote locations, the majority of them located in Canada. With its main base at Kujjuaq Airport in Quebec, Air Inuit has three active 737-200Cs in its fleet, all close to or just over 40 years. Air Inuit operates domestic services to Labrador, Nunavik, and Nunavut.

Canadian North operates one 737-200C and two 737-400Cs. It acquired the latter two when merging with First Air in November 2019. The holly Inuit-owned airline also operates scheduled passenger services to communities in the Northwest Territories, Nunavik, and Nunavut, with a slogan reading ‘Fly the Arctic’.

Charter airline Chrono Aviation, based out of Québec City International Airport, also has a 38-year-old 737-200C in its fleet. Two Combi 737-200s are also deployed by Canadian commodities corporation Glencore.

Meanwhile, Montreal-based charter carrier Nolinor is still operating as many as four 737-200 Combi aircraft. Two are just over four decades old. However, one has passed the 45 mark, while another is still just over 36. The youngest of the group is a 737-200QC, which allows for conversion for either 130 passengers or a combination of passengers and cargo.

Canadian North 737 combi
Canadian North operates three 737 combis, two of which it inherited from the merger with First Air. Photo: Gordon Leggett via Wikimedia Commons

In service of the UN

In other parts of the world, Philippino leisure carrier SEAir International owns one active 737-200C, delivered just this January after a 40-year long history with FedEx, Alaska Airlines, and South African carriers Bionic Aviation and Fair Aviation.

Meanwhile, in Africa, Aviatrade Congo still operates a 737-200C over half a century of age. A younger model, a 28-year-old 737-400C, is owned by South African Safair but leased to the United Nations Humanitarian Air Service.

January 2020 runway overrun in Halifax, Nova Scotia highlights longstanding TSB Watchlist issue

Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 20 May 2021 – In its investigation report (A20A0001) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that changing runways without recalculating the landing distance required based on the changes in wind and runway surface conditions, led to a runway overrun in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 2020.

On 5 January 2020, a WestJet Boeing 737-8CT aircraft was conducting flight WJA248 from Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Ontario, to Halifax/Stanfield International Airport, Nova Scotia, with 172 passengers and six crew members on board. The flight crew had originally planned to conduct an approach for Runway 05. However, due to a lowering ceiling and reduced visibility, the crew requested to change to the Runway 14 instrument landing system approach, which allows for landing with lower minimum ceiling and visibility requirements than the approach to Runway 05. The aircraft then touched down with a tailwind component on the wet, snow-covered runway. The aircraft could not be stopped and it overran the end of Runway 14, coming to rest in snow with the nose wheel approximately 91m beyond the runway end. There were no injuries and no damage to the aircraft.

The investigation found that, while preparing for the runway change, the flight crew mentally assessed that the head wind for Runway 05 would become a crosswind for Runway 14. As a result, they did not recalculate the effects of the wind for the approach to Runway 14, but rather considered that the landing distance and the target approach speed calculated for Runway 05 were still appropriate. However, the reported wind speed and direction changed as the flight progressed, resulting in a tailwind component that exceeded the operator’s limitation, a lower required approach speed, and a landing distance that exceeded the runway length available. None of this was recognized by the flight crew and, as a result, they continued the approach to Runway 14. The unchanged target approach speed combined with the tailwind component resulted in the aircraft touching down at a faster groundspeed, thus requiring a longer stopping distance. The wet snow contamination on the runway reduced braking effectiveness, which also contributed to an increase in landing distance.

Runway overruns have been on the TSB Watchlist since 2010. When a runway overrun occurs during landing, it is important that the aircraft have an adequate safety area beyond the end of the runway to reduce adverse consequences. In this occurrence, the aircraft stopped within the 150m runway end safety area, which meets current international standards.

Following the occurrence, WestJet highlighted to its pilot group the importance of using the actual runway intended for landing when making pre-landing performance calculations. The company also revised its emergency response checklist to include the requirement to pull the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder circuit breakers after an incident, and is now monitoring for landings that exceed the maximum tailwind component in its flight data monitoring program.

See the investigation page for more information.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates air, marine, pipeline, and rail transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.

Boeing 737 Classic Operator Canadian North Wants Three -700s

From Simple Flying – link to source story

by Sumit Singh | May 12, 2021

Canadian North president and CEO Chris Avery has shared that his airline is expecting three Boeing 737-700 aircraft this summer. The carrier plays a crucial role in serving communities across Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. It is now looking to make the most of the unexpected opportunities brought about by the pandemic by upgrading its fleet.

Canadian North 737-300
The company is a wholly Inuit-owned airline based in Kanata, Ontario. Photo: Canadian North

Overcoming the challenges

Boeing 737s make up the biggest portion of Canadian North’s fleet. The airline has a mix of -200, 200C -300, -300(QC), -400, and -400C aircraft in its holdings. Despite the diverse range of 15 737s, the carrier is interested in upgrading to meet its sustainability and efficiency targets.

In a talk with CAPA Live, Avery highlights that the industry conditions before the pandemic made it a challenge for his airline to get hold of an aircraft such as the 737-700. The 737 MAX was grounded, and passenger demand was at an all-time high across the continents. So, getting hold of a -700 at a reasonable price was, understandably, a tough task.

Moreover, the regions that Canadian North serves generally have low populations. As Avery explains it, adding another flight to Clyde River is not the same as providing an extra service to Las Vegas. Therefore, the carrier has to be more reserved with its fleet renewals.

Canadian North Aircraft
Avery emphasizes that the communities that his airline reaches see the impact of climate change first hand. Photo: Canadian North

Ready to take the leap

Nonetheless, the pandemic caused a significant shift amid the downturn in passenger activity. So, the situation is allowing for the operator to transition.Advertisement:

“Getting hold of 737 NG aircraft was cost-prohibitive for us because our scheduled business is reliant on low utilization … We also have a sizable charter business in the West, specializing in workforce movement for the oil sands, and more recently, liquefied natural gas work in northern BC. And again, that’s low utilization flying because we’re flying for the customers when they want,” Avery told CAPA Live.

“… but because of COVID, we’re now able to access next-generation 737 aircraft at lower ownership costs, which are more fuel-efficient and better for the environment than the classic aircraft that we operate. So, we’re moving up the chain and moving up to more fuel-efficient aircraft.”Advertisement:

KLM Boeing 737-700
The 737-700 is a favorite in the industry. Photo: KLM

Keeping in communication

Canadian North also holds 13 ATR 42s. It also has a British Aerospace BAe 146, which it inherited from First Air. These turboprops are praised by airlines working in remote areas for their ability to take off and land in tough conditions.

Altogether, the airline in talks with ATR and Boeing about further renewing the fleet. The two manufacturers understand the economics of the airline. So, after the parties conclude on the right solution in the next chapter, there may be further additions this decade. Until then, Canadian North will be looking to put the 737 NG’s promoted superior, efficiency, reliability, and high-value returns to the test.

Canadian North to phase out jet service to western Nunavut hubs

From Nunatsiaq News – link to source story

Boeing 737-200 jets to be replaced by turbo-props

Canadian North plans to retire its two Boeing 737-200 Combis, which can land on gravel runways where other similarly sized jets can’t. (File photo)

By  Jane George | 29 April 2021

Canadian North plans to end its jet service to Cambridge Bay and Kugluktuk because these two communities’ runways are not paved.

The airline’s two Boeing 737-200 jets that can land on gravel are nearing the end of their lives.

“To extend [their lifetimes] further would require prohibitively expensive capital investments,” said Andrew Pope, the airline’s vice-president, customer and commercial.

“Our intention is to instead invest those funds into new aircraft acquisitions to support our entire network, including the Kitikmeot region.”

The first 737-200 will be retired in May and the second will be retired as early as 2022.

Once that happens, Canadian North plans to use a new ATR42-500 turbo-prop aircraft for its service to the Kitikmeot. The airline will use a different, unspecified plane for cargo.

Turbo-prop aircraft may be slower than jet aircraft, he said, but the flights will only be around 20 minutes longer.

Ticket prices or cargo rates for the Kitikmeot region will not rise after the change in aircraft, Pope said.

What Happened To Air Canada’s Airbus A340-600 Order?

From Simple Flying – link to source story

by Sumit Singh, Deputy Editor | May 2, 2021

At the Paris Air Show in June 1997, Airbus shared details about its Airbus A340-600 motives. Amid the excitement, it didn’t take long for Air Canada to order the plane. It was one of the first airlines to place an order for the variant, but it would cancel the deal approximately a decade later.

A340-600 Plane Silhouette
The Airbus A340-600 is increasingly becoming a rare sight. Photo: Getty Images

Grand prospects

During its reveal, the A340-600 was highlighted to transport up to 378 passengers, which was a significant figure as it was only 25 fewer than many variants of the Boeing 747. Air Canada was keen to take on new widebodies that year, ordering eight new A330s and A340s. These planes had a list price of $1.4 billion at the time, which is a figure approximate to $2.1 billion today.

According to The New York Times, the flag carrier of Canada had an option to take on extra planes, starting with five units split between A340-600s and A340-500. It also had options to acquire 10 additional planes from 2002.

Industry woes

A FlightGlobal report from July 2008 shares that Air Canada initially deferred the delivery of three -600s to 2004. This deferral was then extended to 2010. However, the carrier ended up canceling the whole order.

Notably, the 9/11 attacks shook up the aviation industry across the world. Even though the overall financial impact isn’t as considerable compared with the current crisis, for its time, the situation was tough, and numerous airlines struggled. Due to the challenges that carriers faced, there were several fleet reshuffles and strategy changes.Advertisement:

An Air Canada A340 aircraft
Despite not taking on the -600, Air Canada had 15 other A340 variants within its fleet, first joining the firm in 1995. Photo: Getty Images

Air Canada’s approach shift can be noticed with its wider fleet. Several aircraft types had left the carrier in the years after 9/11. The McDonnell Douglas DC-9-30 and Bombardier CRJ100 were phased out of mainline operations in 2002. After that, Boeing 737-200 747-400, and 747-200M and Fokker F28 Fellowship left in 2004. Moreover, the 767-200 left in 2008.

Most notably, Air Canada’s other A340 variants were also let go during this period. According to Planespotters.net, the A340-300 stopped service for the airline in November 2008. Two A340-500s also joined the company in the summer of 2004. However, both C-GKOL and C-GKOM left for Brazil’s TAM three years later, in November 2007.Advertisement:

A good call

Looking back, the decision to cancel the A340-600 was the right one. Gargantuan quadjets swiftly struggled to find a consistent place in aviation in the 2010s. Thus, several carriers have been rapidly phasing out the likes of the A340, A380, and 747 in preference of modern, twinjet options.

Virgin A340-600
Virgin Atlantic retired its final A340-600s in March 2020. Photo: Getty Images.

Today, most of the airlines that took on the A340-600 no longer operate the plane. Now, only a handful of major airlines fly it. Looking at Air Canada’s fleet strategy in recent years, the carrier may have found itself also retiring the aircraft sooner than later.

777 Partners and Flair Airlines Confirmed for Boeing 737 MAX

From Airline Geeks – link to source story

The new Flair Airlines livery seen on one of the airline’s 737-400s. (Photo: Flair Airlines)

March 13, 2021 | By Ian McMurtry

As the Boeing 737 MAX works it way back into the sky, a steady stream of orders are starting to work their way into the Renton orderbooks. Boeing’s latest customer is 777 Partners, who was confirmed to pick up 24 737 MAX 8 models with an additional 60 more options after entering an originally agreement for the deal back in January. The airline company plans to lease the aircraft, with only Flair Airlines being confirmed to receive the aircraft type. The Miami-based investment firm hopes with the aircraft’s economics will bring forwards plans that it has with its growing list of low-cost carrier investments in the post COVID environment.

Flair Airlines is confirmed to take hold of 13 of the leased aircraft, who will be an inter-company movement as Flair is 25% owned by 777 Partners since 2019. Flair had previously operated over a half dozen Boeing models, but the current COVID market saw the Boeing 737-400 retired and the fleet cut to just three Boeing 737-800s. The airline operates hubs in Edmonton and Vancouver and focuses on low cost flying on inter-Canadian routes.

Formed in Miami in 2015 through means of a buyout from its previous ownership, the 777 Partners investment group has taken interest in aviation as part of the company’s portfolio. The company has a previously mentioned stake in Flair Airlines of Canada, as well as interest in the Air Black Box and World Ticket Solutions companies. The investment firm is also a player in the Value Alliance, an ultra-low-cost carrier alliance consisting of Cebu Pacific, Cebgo, Jeju Air, Nok Air and Scoot.

777 Partners had also previously planned to restart World Airways as a low-cost link between Miami and Los Angeles to Asia and Latin America using Boeing 787s, however, news of a start date or plans past the initial marketing idea have yet to be released. The company also does with in the commercial finance, insurance, litigation finance and entertainment industries.

The investment firm’s founder Joshua Wander commented on the transaction, saying, “the 737-8 aircraft are a fantastic addition to our aviation portfolio and will enable our partners to leverage the jets’ superior economic performance to deliver low fares for their passengers while reducing their carbon footprint.”

777 Partners joins the windfall of support for the narrowbody aircraft type as the Boeing 737 MAX begins its return to service. The aircraft manufacturer inked a 25-jet deal with United earlier this week and appears to be close to landing an additional deal with Southwest to expand its MAX fleet. Boeing currently lists that there are 3,955 undelivered Boeing 737 MAX orders to date with 39 models being confirmed for delivery in the first few months of 2021.

Westjet Update: 16 April ~ Charles Duncan Adds Swoop President to Title

From WestJet

WESTJET EXECUTIVE CHARLES DUNCAN ADDS SWOOP PRESIDENT TO TITLE 

WestJet today announced that Charles Duncan, WestJet Executive Vice-President in charge of cargo, will now add Swoop President to his title. Charles takes on the additional role starting April 17, 2020 as Steven Greenway steps down after two years.  

“Charles has been a valued member of the Executive team and his airline experience at the helm of WestJet Encore will be an asset to Swoop,” said Ed Sims, WestJet President and CEO. “Charles takes on the role at a crucial time and we look forward to his guidance, energy and expertise as the WestJet Group weathers this COVID-19 crisis and then as we look to build off the success that Swoop has already achieved.” 

“I am thrilled to be joining the team at Swoop,” said Charles Duncan, WestJet Executive Vice-President and President of Swoop. “In spite of the current challenges in the market, we remain committed to the ultra-low-cost carrier model and believe it will be an important element of our future success.” 

Charles will continue to report to Ed Sims, WestJet President and CEO and in addition to the WestJet cargo team, will add three direct reports from Swoop. Charles joined WestJet in June of 2017 as the President of WestJet Encore. In August 2018, he moved into the role of Executive Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer before adding Cargo to his portfolio in 2019. Before joining WestJet, he was with Continental Airlines and then, through merger, with United Airlines.  

Continued Sims, “I would also like to thank Steven Greenway for his time at Swoop and on the WestJet Executive team. Steven was essential to the startup and success of Swoop and I thank him for his role in introducing the ULCC experience to many Canadians and creating such successful operations in such a short time. Steven’s tenacious and no-nonsense nature will be missed.” 

WESTJET GOING TO GUATEMALA ON REPATRIATION OPERATION 

WestJet is now offering flights for sale to repatriate Canadians from Guatemala City (GUA), Guatemala to Toronto (YYZ), Canada on April 23. 

The flight is the eighth offered in collaboration with the Government of Canada where to-date in April, WestJet has brought back more than 1,100 Canadians. The airline also carried more than 10,000 people home in March after announcing that all international and transborder service would be suspended in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. 

The repatriation flight is planned as follows: 

April 23, 2020 from Guatemala City (GUA) to Toronto (YYZ) on WestJet’s 737-800. 

These flights are part of WestJet’s efforts to bring Canadian citizens home after the suspension of international service due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

In addition, WestJet is keeping critical economic lifelines open in Canada through continued operations to all the domestic cities it currently serves now with decreased frequency. 

ADDITIONAL REPATRIATION FLIGHT SCHEDULE 

Friday, April 17 from Guatemala City (GUA), Guatemala to Toronto (YYZ), Canada on WestJet’s 737-800. 

WESTJET CARGO ENSURING CANADA’S LIFELINE REACHES COMMUNITIES DURING COVID-19  

The need for blood remains strong and WestJet Cargo is keeping a domestic lifeline open for Canadians that need it by continuing to fly blood and blood products across the country for Canadian Blood Services.  

Read full story on the WestJet blog here.  

FLEXIBLE CHANGE/CANCEL POLICY  

  • We continue to offer our guests flexible change/cancel policies for travel in April, May and June with refund to travel bank for use within 24-months.  
  • More details on our policies are available here

AFFECTED FLIGHTS – visit the blog (updated) 

WestJet strengthens Atlantic gateway with new Halifax-Manchester service

Provided by Westjet, an Alberta Partnership/CNW

Airline announces additional route connecting Eastern Canada to the United Kingdom

CALGARY, Jan. 17, 2020 /CNW/ – Today, WestJet is forging another connection across the Atlantic into the United Kingdom with the announcement of new non-stop service between Halifax, N.S., and Manchester U.K. beginning June 5, 2020. This summer, WestJet will operate more than 300 seasonal departures from Halifax to London (Gatwick) and Glasgow, Scotland.

WestJet strengthens Atlantic gateway with new Halifax-Manchester service (CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)
WestJet strengthens Atlantic gateway with new Halifax-Manchester service (CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)
WestJet’s seasonal service between Halifax Stanfield (YHZ) and Manchester Airport (MAN) will operate four-times weekly on the airline’s Boeing 737-700. (CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)
WestJet’s seasonal service between Halifax Stanfield (YHZ) and Manchester Airport (MAN) will operate four-times weekly on the airline’s Boeing 737-700. (CNW Group/WESTJET, an Alberta Partnership)

“WestJet is continuing to invest in our Atlantic gateway, connecting Nova Scotia to the world and the world to Nova Scotia in new ways,” said Charles Duncan, WestJet Chief Strategy Officer. “The U.K. is Nova Scotia’s largest in-bound tourism market and our newest investment connects the province to new sources of tourists.”

“WestJet’s addition of another European connection strengthens the Atlantic Gateway and will help grow our economy. It will lead to more trade and investment opportunities, as well as help attract more students, immigrants, and visitors to Nova Scotia and the entire Atlantic region,” said Premier Stephen McNeil.

Manchester Airport is considered the global gateway to northern England and offers easy access to and from its historic city centre.  With its evolved industrial heritage, the city is perfect for exploring thanks to its culture, love of football, restaurants and pubs. In addition, WestJet guests will have 16 more destinations to choose from out of Manchester on Virgin Connect, one of the largest regional carriers in Europe.

WestJet’s seasonal service between Halifax Stanfield (YHZ) and Manchester Airport (MAN) will operate four-times weekly on the airline’s Boeing 737-700. Flights are timed for convenient connectivity across WestJet’s network into and out of Halifax.

WestJet has served Halifax since 2003 and has seen 300 per cent growth in flights to and from Halifax Stanfield and now serves 16 cities with an average of 60 daily inbound and outbound flights per day from Halifax.

Details of WestJet’s service between Halifax and Manchester, U.K.:

RouteFrequencyDepartingArrivingEffective
Halifax-
Manchester
Four-times
weekly
10:45 p.m.8:10 a.m. (+1)June 5, 2020-
October 24,
2020
Manchester-
Halifax
Four-times
weekly
9:45 a.m.11:52 a.m.June 6, 2020-
October 24,
2020

WestJet is also proud to partner with Discover Halifax and Halifax International Airport Authority on its Stopover Halifax program. The program opens the door for arriving and connecting passengers at Halifax Stanfield to experience more of the city by booking it as a stopover from seven hours to seven days at no additional airfare.

Additional Quotes:
“I applaud WestJet for opening new routes through Halifax to the United Kingdom,” said Kody Blois, Member of Parliament, Kings-Hants. “This new seasonal service will help draw additional tourists to the province and further drive economic growth in the region. Stanfield International Airport itself is a major employer in our local community that will directly benefit from this significant investment by the airline.

“This exciting new direct flight to Manchester will further open the Halifax skies to tourists, business and more than a few soccer fans,” said Mike Savage, Mayor of Halifax Regional Municipality. “Whatever their ultimate travel destination, we welcome visitors arriving from Manchester to take full advantage of their time in Halifax and Nova Scotia.”

“We’re thrilled to add Manchester to a growing list of European cities connected by non-stop service at Halifax Stanfield,” said Joyce Carter, President & CEO, Halifax International Airport Authority. “WestJet continues to be a great partner who supports the development of our East Coast Hub, providing more choice to our passengers. We look forward to welcoming the first visitors on this new service later this year with our unique Maritime hospitality.”

“It’s great to start 2020 with the news that WestJet will be commencing direct services to Manchester Airport from Halifax,” said Julian Carr, Manchester Airport, Aviation Director. “We are delighted to have another North American route in our portfolio, giving our 29.5 million annual passengers more choice and connectivity to get across the Atlantic and beyond. Not only will this route provide the North of England direct access to a great city like Halifax, but the service will also open a host of other Canadian cities which we don’t currently serve. It’s another clear indication of the role we play in connecting the northern powerhouse to key international hubs.”

“We are thrilled with the addition of the new route from Halifax to Manchester which will make it even easier for travellers to explore the North of England and beyond,” said Paul Gauger, Senior Vice President The Americas, VisitBritain, the national tourism agency for Britain. “We hope that the new flights, along with our message of welcome and great value, inspires even more visitors from Canada to book a trip to Britain right now.”

FLYHT Awarded SatCom Contract from WestJet

Provided by FLYHT Aerospace Solutions Ltd./Globe Newswire

CALGARY, Alberta, Jan. 16, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — FLYHT Aerospace Solutions Ltd. (TSX-V: FLY) (OTCQX: FLYLF) (the “Company” or “FLYHT”) has secured a US$6.2 million contract with WestJet to install FLYHT’s Automated Flight Information Reporting System (AFIRS™).

Under the terms of the five year agreement, FLYHT will provide WestJet with AFIRS units to support satellite communications (Satcom) as well as Satcom Air Traffic Control (ATC) data safety services, FANS datalink (allowing pilots and ATC to communicate directly, using digital text transmissions), and voice capabilities. WestJet will use AFIRS on its entire Boeing 737 fleet. As a result, AFIRS will be installed on more than 160 aircraft at WestJet.

“WestJet is on its way to becoming a global network airline and adding them to our growing customer base is a milestone for FLYHT,” says Derek Taylor, Sales Director at FLYHT. “With each new customer, we gain an additional proof point that validates the efficacy of our solutions. We look forward to providing WestJet with upgraded Satcom capabilities and leveraging this contract to generate additive benefits for both FLYHT and WestJet.”