Air Canada Resumes Service Between Montreal and Toronto Island Airport Beginning September 8

MONTREAL, Sept. 3, 2021 /CNW Telbec/ – Air Canada today announced it will resume service to Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport on Toronto Island beginning September 8, 2021 with five daily return flights to Montreal. Seats are available for booking at aircanada.com, via the Air Canada App, Air Canada’s Contact Centres and travel agencies.

“We are pleased to restart our operations at Billy Bishop airport and offer our customers the choice to fly in and out of Toronto Island, which is popular among business travellers for its proximity to the city centre and its ability to connect travellers to our global network through Montreal. Our schedule enables travellers to conveniently fly between Montreal and Toronto Island Airport up to five times per day, linking the two key business and cultural centres as we continue to play our part to reinvigorate Canada’s economy. We look forward to welcoming our customers back on board and expanding our daily service as more traffic returns,” said Mark Galardo, Senior Vice President, Network Planning and Revenue Management at Air Canada.

Air Canada’s Toronto Island-Montreal Service

FlightDepartsArrivesDays of Operation
AC7952Toronto at 07:15Montreal at 08:27Daily
AC7958Toronto at 10:20Montreal at 11:33Daily
AC7970Toronto at 16:15Montreal at 17:28Daily
AC7976Toronto at 17:15Montreal at 18:28Daily
AC7974Toronto at 18:20Montreal at 19:33Daily
AC7959Montreal at 07:30Toronto at 08:49Daily
AC7955Montreal at 08:30Toronto at 09:49Daily
AC7965Montreal at 13:30Toronto at 14:49Daily
AC7971Montreal at 16:30Toronto at 17:49Daily
AC7975Montreal at 18:30Toronto at 19:49Daily

Service to Toronto Island will be operated by Air Canada Express Jazz with a De Havilland Dash 8-400 featuring a complimentary snack and drink. All customers can collect and redeem Aeroplan Points through Canada’s leading loyalty program when travelling with Air Canada, and eligible customers have access to priority check-in, Maple Leaf Lounges at Canadian airports, priority boarding and other benefits.  Air Canada’s commercial schedule may be adjusted as required based on the COVID-19 trajectory and government restrictions.

Air Canada offers its customers complimentary shuttle bus service between downtown and Toronto City Airport. The shuttle brings travellers to and from the west entrance of The Fairmont Royal York Hotel, located at the corner of Front and York streets, directly across from Union Station.

About Air Canada

Air Canada is Canada’s largest domestic and international airline and, in 2019, was among the top 20 largest airlines in the world. It is Canada’s flag carrier and a founding member of Star Alliance, the world’s most comprehensive air transportation network. Air Canada is the only international network carrier in North America to receive a Four-Star ranking according to independent U.K. research firm Skytrax. In 2020, Air Canada was named Global Traveler’s Best Airline in North America for the second straight year. In January 2021, Air Canada received APEX’s Diamond Status Certification for the Air Canada CleanCare+ biosafety program for managing COVID-19, the only airline in Canada to attain the highest APEX ranking. Air Canada has also committed to a net zero emissions goal from all global operations by 2050. 

Prime minister, premier called out to support De Havilland strikers

Unifor National President Jerry Dias speaks at De Havilland rally.

August 24, 2021 – 12:00 AM

August 24, 2021

TORONTO – Unifor National President Jerry Dias is calling on the prime minister and the Ontario premier to state publicly that there will be no government money for De Havilland if Unifor members are not building the Dash-8 airplane.

“I’m reaching out to Justin Trudeau today and saying Justin you better come out today to say that not one nickel of federal government money will ever see the pockets of Longview if they try to screw the 700 families in Downsview,” Dias told a rally of striking De Havilland workers and supporters today.

Members of Unifor Locals 112 and 673 have been on strike since July 27. Parent company Longview Aviation Capital announced earlier this year it would no longer build the new Dash 8-400 aircraft at the Downsview plant. Dias said the Dash-8 program has long relied on government support, and that both levels of government need to make it clear those days are over without a fair deal.

“The province didn’t put hundreds of millions of dollars into this program so the jobs could go to Alberta,” Dias said.

In Thunder Bay, Premier Doug Ford called moving the Dash-8 out of Ontario “disgusting” and vowed to fight any such move.

Speakers at the rally pointed to the 700 families who rely on the plant to support their families, and called on Longview to return to the bargaining table.

“You might have bought the De Havilland name, but it was the workers who built that name,” said Local 673 President Maryellen McIlmoyle. Local 112 President Scott McIlmoyle said these have been “by far the most frustrating” negotiations he has ever encountered. “Longview has folks at the table who can’t make decisions,” he said.

Despite a court injunction limiting picketing last week, Dias said no one will be allowed into the plant until a deal is reached.

About Unifor

Unifor is Canada’s largest union in the private sector and represents 315,000 workers in every major area of the economy. The union advocates for all working people and their rights, fights for equality and social justice in Canada and abroad, and strives to create progressive change for a better future.

De Havilland workers rally to keep 700 jobs in Ontario

TORONTO, Aug. 23, 2021 /CNW/ – Unifor will hold a rally and news conference at the De Havilland picket line on Tuesday, August 24, 2021, where workers are on strike to stop their wealthy corporate owners from moving Dash 8 aircraft production, putting 700 jobs at the Toronto facility at risk.  

Unifor National President Jerry Dias at the De Havilland picket line (CNW Group/Unifor)
Unifor National President Jerry Dias at the De Havilland picket line (CNW Group/Unifor)

“Our union cannot and will not stand idly by as the future of hundreds of highly-skilled workers’ jobs are in jeopardy, threatening the aviation sector’s post-COVID economic recovery,” said Unifor National President Jerry Dias. “Workers deserve better than to be kicked to the curb during a once-in-a-century pandemic by a company whose owner happens to be the wealthiest woman in the country.”

The labour dispute at De Havilland is at the centre of the crisis in Canada’s aerospace sector. Workers have been on strike since July 27, 2021 over the future location of the De Havilland Dash 8 program. Workers at De Havilland, owned by Sherry Brydson of the Thomson family, have built the iconic Dash 8 for generations. The absence of a settlement leaves 700 advanced manufacturing jobs at risk with the current Downsview plant scheduled to close at the end of 2021.

De Havilland workers continue strike action at Downsview

TORONTO, Aug. 2, 2021 /CNW/ – More than 700 De Havilland workers at the Downsview plant remain on strike after the continued negotiations with the company failed to resolve the dispute.

“Union members at the Downsview plant have always clocked in together, worked together, bargained together, and, when necessary, gone on strike together,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President who started his career at the plant. “This situation was caused by Bombardier when they committed to not sell the Dash 8 program then proceeded to do just that.”

Unifor member with Unifor flag outside of Bombardier Aviation Downsview plant (CNW Group/Unifor)
Unifor member with Unifor flag outside of Bombardier Aviation Downsview plant (CNW Group/Unifor)

Bombardier announced plans to sell the Downsview site in May 2018 and in its deliberations with the federal and provincial governments, Bombardier made clear commitments to maintain jobs.

The contract and commitments between Unifor and Bombardier were immediately violated when Bombardier sold the Dash 8 program to Longview Aviation Capital controlled by Thompson family heiress Sherry Brydson.

“We now have the unfortunate situation where we have a tentative agreement with Bombardier and a strike at De Havilland,” added Dias. “This strike is about Longview’s determination that if they revive the Dash 8 program, and we know they will, Longview will likely do so in Calgary. We cannot allow hundreds of highly-skilled aerospace workers in Ontario who built these aircraft for generations, to be left behind.”

Unifor has met with federal ministers and the various provincial government officials including to the Premier to secure governmental cooperation that ensures the commitments made to maintain jobs related to the sale of the Downsview lands are adhered to.

“No one, not even a billionaire heiress from the Thompson family, has the right to violate the commitments made to Downsview workers,” added Dias.

This labour dispute will continue until a fair settlement is reached.

Unifor is Canada’s largest union in the private sector, representing 315,000 workers in every major area of the economy. The union advocates for all working people and their rights, fights for equality and social justice in Canada and abroad, and strives to create progressive change for a better future.

Union ratifies deal with Bombardier at Downsview; talks with De Havilland continue

From CTV News – link to source story

The Canadian Press Staff | Sunday, August 1, 2021

Unifor

A Unifor flag seen at a rally in Regina. (Brendan Ellis/CTV News)

TORONTO — Unifor says members of two of its locals have ratified an agreement with Bombardier Aviation at its Downsview plant in north Toronto.

Unifor National President Jerry Dias says in a statement that the three-year collective agreement approved by members of Local 112 and 673 makes “significant progress” on key issues such as pensions, as well as on job protection against outsourcing and the use of contractors.

Workers will see raises of 0.5 per cent in Year 1, 0.75 per cent in Year 2 and one per cent in Year 3.

The workers launched a strike late last month against the business jet manufacturer and De Havilland, which it says had made Dash 8 turboprops at the facility.

Unifor says the ratified deal covers approximately 1,500 Bombardier Aviation workers, and runs from June 23, 2021 to June 23, 2024.

But it says 700 De Havilland workers remain on strike as negotiations between it and the company continue, with a dedicated picket line in operation at the De Havilland area of the facility.

“As the industry recovers from this once-in-a-century pandemic and Bombardier prepares to move production to a new facility at Pearson Airport, these collective agreements will ensure our highly skilled members will maintain wages, pension, benefits and other working conditions that are among the best in the industry,” Dias said in the statement.

The union has said the future of the Dash 8 program is the focus of talks with De Havilland.

De Havilland announced earlier this year that it would no longer produce new Dash 8s at the facility beyond currently confirmed orders. De Havilland indicated two years ago that work will end at Downsview once lease agreements for the land expire.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 31, 2021.

Unifor members at Bombardier Aviation and De Havilland Aircraft on strike

TORONTO, July 27, 2021 /CNW/ – Unifor members of Local 112 and 673 at the Downsview plant employed by Bombardier Aviation and De Havilland Aircraft Canada commenced strike action as of 10:01 a.m. today.

“We will remain at the bargaining table with both companies as the strike action is ongoing,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “Our union will continue to make every effort to reach a fair settlement but we have a number of key issues to resolve with both employers.”

Unifor Local 112 and 673 members on the picket line at the Downsview plant. (CNW Group/Unifor)
Unifor Local 112 and 673 members on the picket line at the Downsview plant. (CNW Group/Unifor)

Approximately 1,500 Bombardier workers and 700 De Havilland workers are on strike affecting both companies. The Downsview plant is the manufacturing site for Bombardier’s Global series aircraft and De Havilland’s Dash 8 turboprop aircraft.

“Our members are among the most highly skilled workers in the country, building two of the highest quality aircraft products in the world. What we’re looking for is an agreement that reflects that,” said Scott McIlmoyle, President of Unifor Local 112 which represents production and skilled trades workers at the Downsview site.

Unifor previously outlined the union’s key priorities in the negotiations, including pensions, use of contractors and erosion of bargaining unit work at Bombardier and the future of the Dash 8 program at De Havilland. Other issues relate to the sale of the Downsview site in 2018 and both companies’ planned exit of the facility.

“Our members do highly technical, intricate, and precise work that supports some of the most advanced manufacturing this country does. These are demanding jobs. Our members work hard and deserve nothing less than an agreement that values their incredible contribution to these companies and respects their hard work,” said Maryellen McIlmoyle, President of Unifor Local 673 which represents technical, office, and professional workers at both companies.

The union remains committed to reaching a fair settlement with Bombardier Aviation and De Havilland Aircraft of Canada.

Unifor is Canada’s largest union in the private sector, representing 315,000 workers in every major area of the economy. The union advocates for all working people and their rights, fights for equality and social justice in Canada and abroad, and strives to create progressive change for a better future.

De Havilland Canada Will Continue to Meet All Customer Needs Despite Strike Action; Reiterates Need to Transform Business to Operating Realities

ORONTO, July 27, 2021 /CNW/ – De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Limited (“De Havilland Canada” or the “Company”) released the following statement in response to the decision by Unifor Locals 112 and 673 (collectively, the “Union”) to strike today.  

De Havilland Canada has been working closely with Union leaders for several weeks to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement (“CBA”) that benefits all parties. In late June Unifor requested a 30-day extension of the CBA. The Company agreed to the Union’s request out of good faith and hoped that the Union would use the time to adjust its negotiating posture to enable a mutually agreeable outcome. The Company is therefore disappointed that in media statements prior to the resumption of negotiations, and at the bargaining table, the Union continued to assert a position that is drastically out of step with the realities facing De Havilland Canada’s business, and the aviation industry more generally.

De Havilland Canada is eager to collaborate with the Union as we chart a sustainable long-term future for aircraft manufacturing and the skilled employment it supports. But the ability to work together toward a long-term future relies on a concerted effort to transform the business to the circumstances we are facing.

The Company has been consistent in asserting that in order for any agreement to be effective in providing sustainable opportunities for Union members, it must reflect the need to transform the Company in the face of the global aviation industry’s challenging operating context, the market environment for new aircraft, and the fact that the Downsview production site had been sold by its prior owner.

These challenging circumstances are not about our workers – or the Union. The need to transform the Dash 8 aircraft business dates back several years, prior to the pandemic, and prior to De Havilland Canada’s acquisition of the program.

The sale of the production site by the previous owner Bombardier in 2018, established deadlines by which the runway must be demolished and the aircraft site vacated. Put simply: from the moment of that land sale, aircraft manufacturing at Downsview was on borrowed time. De Havilland Canada’s owners invested on this basis out of confidence in the long-term potential of the aircraft program, but the Company has been clear since the outset that change was inevitable.

The need to transform has been made more acute by the pandemic, and its severe effects on the global aviation industry. Customer demand for new aircraft has declined severely as global airlines lost approximately US$128 billion in 2020 and are forecasted to lose another US$48 billion in 2021 (according to IATA forecasts).

Despite the near-term challenges, De Havilland Canada maintains an optimistic outlook on its future and the future of Dash 8 program, and has stated publicly that it intends for the Company to be ready to meet new aircraft demand as the industry recovers (https://dehavilland.com/en/news/posts/focused-on-enhancing-support-to-the-global-dash-8-community-as-the-aviation-industry-recovers). However, the Company cannot and will not rush to a decision on future production location, nor negotiate a site plan in public.

The sole focus of De Havilland Canada’s transformation efforts is to improve the Company’s competitiveness and enhance support to operators of Dash 8 aircraft around the world. The Union must play its part in facilitating this transformation. A fair and reasonable collective bargaining agreement is fundamental to the Company’s ability to continue to invest to develop a sustainable long-term future for the aircraft program – and the highly paid employment it supports.

We are looking to the future of the Dash 8 with optimism. Our leadership and sales teams are in active and ongoing discussions with customers, and De Havilland Canada has continued to invest in product and service innovations to enhance the Dash 8 aircraft’s relevance to customers. The July 15, 2021 announcement of our collaborative work to integrate hybrid-electric technology into a Dash 8-100 flight demonstrator is further evidence of our commitment to build a long-term future for this aircraft program 
(https://dehavilland.com/en/news/posts/de-havilland-canada-working-with-pratt-whitney-canada-to-support-the-development-of-sustainable-hybrid-electric-aircraft-propulsion-technology).

Our negotiating team remains at the bargaining table to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement that benefits all parties.

In the meantime, the Company has comprehensive contingency plans in place in order to continue to meet all customer requirements.

Commitment to the Future of the Dash 8 Aircraft Program
In February 2021, De Havilland Canada reaffirmed its long-term commitment to the global Dash 8 aircraft program, and the Company will be ready to meet new aircraft demand as the industry recovers. The Company continues to make future-oriented investments to enhance the Company’s competitiveness and ensure that Dash 8 Series aircraft remain at the forefront of the regional aircraft market. 

As part of the planned evolution of the Dash 8 platform, and pursuant to the sale of the Downsview production site by previous owner Bombardier in 2018, De Havilland Canada has begun preparing to leave the Downsview site in line with the lease expiry in 2021.

About De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Limited
De Havilland Canada’s portfolio includes support to the worldwide fleet of Dash 8-100/200/300/400 aircraft, as well as production and sales of the Dash 8-400 aircraft. https://dehavilland.com

Production of De Havilland turboprops key to negotiations as strike deadline nears

From City News 1130 – link to source story

BY ROSS MAROWITS, THE CANADIAN PRESS | Jul 25, 2021

The exterior of the Bombardier Global 7500 jetline is photographed during a press conference event in Mississauga on Wednesday, December 4, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

The union representing Bombardier and De Havilland aerospace workers in Toronto are threatening a strike this week unless negotiations can guarantee Dash 8 turboprop jobs remain in the GTA.

After a three-week cooling-off period, separate talks were set to resume Sunday ahead of a Tuesday strike deadline.

Unifor national president Jerry Dias said the negotiations are about “protecting the kind of highly skilled advanced manufacturing jobs we need now more than ever.” 

About 2,200 members of Unifor Local 112 and Local 673 at Toronto’s Downsview plant manufacture Bombardier’s Global business aircraft and until recently the Dash 8 turboprops for De Havilland Canada. 

The labour negotiations come at a time when the aviation sector is taking baby steps to recover from government-forced shutdowns of international commercial travel because of COVID-19.

With the COVID-19 pandemic taking a bite out of aircraft sales, hundreds of aerospace employees are on layoff as production winds down on the Dash 8.

The regional aircraft is used by airlines including WestJet, Porter and Jazz.

The union wants De Havilland, whose parent company is Longview Aviation Capital Corp., to commit to making the Dash 8 somewhere in Greater Toronto when production resumes.

“When they say to me we don’t have any sales on the horizon, I believe them. But the bottom line is, if they’re going to build that plane our members are building it,” said Dias, who began his career working at the Downsview plant in the 1970s.

Longview bought the turboprop program from Bombardier for $300 million in June 2019 and formed a holding company called De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. 

The company announced earlier this year that it would no longer produce new Q400 aircraft at the facility beyond currently confirmed orders. De Havilland indicated two years ago that work will end at Downsview once lease agreements for the land expire.

Dias fears De Havilland plans to move production to its facilities in Alberta.

He said the company refused to bargain any sort of scope clauses that would limit production to somewhere in the GTA, including Pearson International Airport where Bombardier has broken ground on a new facility for its Global business jets.

“Their silence on the matter is very troublesome,” he said in an interview. “The bottom line is we’ve got a lot of people have worked there for a lot of years and have worked on this program and they deserve the right to continue to build the program.”

De Havilland said it believes the Dash 8 has a future despite the challenges faced by the industry because of the pandemic. 

“However, the company cannot and will not rush to a decision on future production location, nor negotiate a site plan in public,” it said in an email.

“We are eager to work in partnership with the union as we chart a sustainable long-term future for aircraft manufacturing. But that future relies on a concerted effort to transform the business to the circumstances we are facing.”

De Havilland said the union must agree to “a fair and reasonable” collective agreement that is fundamental to the company’s future investment in the aircraft.

Unifor is negotiating separately with Bombardier, with the two sides battling over a variety of items including wages and working conditions.

However, Dias said a strike would affect operations of both companies because of their shared driveway, entrance and exit.

“The bottom line is, if we have a strike with either of the two, the entire facilities are down,” he said, adding that there’s a lot of solidarity among members because many worked side-by-side for 25 to 30 years.

Unifor negotiated a contract with Bombardier in 2018 that expired in June. They committed not to sell the Dash 8 program and then did just that.

“So the mess we’re in now by and large they created. So if they end up being caught in the crossfire, well then too bad for them. They created a mess in the first place.” Dias said.

Bombardier said talks are progressing “constructively” after both sides agreed to a brief pause but the company declined to comment on “hypothetical scenarios.”

“Bombardier negotiations with Downsview employees have a history of positive outcomes – we’ve concluded agreements for nearly two decades,’ it said in a statement. 

“Right now, Bombardier is focused on reaching an equitable agreement that helps preserve jobs and positions Bombardier and Unifor members for success as the business aviation industry rebounds.”

Workers in Toronto have built Dash-series aircraft since 1946, including the Dash 8 series for more than 30 years. 

The federal and Quebec governments recently announced a $700-million injection into the aerospace industry, including nearly $70 million for aircraft engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney to develop the first sustainable hybrid-electric prototype propulsion system with various partners, including DHC and the Dash 8. 

Bombardier sold Downsview, a 148-hectare tract of land that used to be a military airport, to Canadian pension manager Public Sector Pension Investment Board in June 2018 for US$635 million or net proceeds of US$550 million after costs.

Unifor wants the federal and Ontario governments to press De Havilland to maintain jobs in the province especially after approval of severing the land in Downsview was approved on the premise that jobs would be protected, said Dias.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 25, 2021.

Limited visual cues and runway conditions contributed to runway excursion of passenger aircraft in Terrace, BC

Richmond, British Columbia, 22 July 2021 — In its investigation report (A20P0013) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found that limited visual cues due to falling snow and a snow-covered runway contributed to the 2020 runway excursion involving a WestJet Encore De Havilland of Canada Ltd. DHC-8-402 in Terrace, British Columbia.

The occurrence aircraft on Runway 33 at Terrace Airport. Image taken approximately 9 hours after the occurrence (Source: Terrace Airport)

On 31 January 2020, a De Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. DHC-8-402 aircraft was conducting WestJet Encore flight WEN3107 from Vancouver, BC to Terrace, BC with four crew members and 43 passengers on board. During the landing roll, the aircraft drifted left from the snow-cleared area of the runway and the left main landing gear exited the runway surface, travelling for approximately 400 feet before returning to the runway. During the runway excursion, the aircraft’s nose landing gear collapsed. The aircraft came to a stop in the centre of the runway. The passengers were transported to the airport terminal by bus approximately 30 minutes after landing. No injuries were reported. The damage to the aircraft included the collapsed nose landing gear and damaged right propeller blades.

The investigation found that, given the falling snow and the snow-covered runway, there were limited visual cues available to the flight crew, which decreased their ability to accurately judge the aircraft’s lateral position once it was beyond the runway threshold. Snow clearing operations cleared the centre 100 feet of the runway, which resulted in windrows that were approximately 18 inches high along the edges of the cleared area. This reduced the pilot’s lateral maneuvering room during the landing.

It was also determined that the aircraft initially touched down 10 feet left of the centreline due to control inputs and variable wind conditions and, while the aircraft was still in a light weight-on-wheels condition, a gust contributed to a further deviation to the left until the left main landing gear came into contact with the windrow. As a result, the aircraft was pulled to the left and travelled through the uncleared portion of the runway. During the runway excursion, snow and ice became packed in the nose landing gear bay and caused structural deformation. Consequently, the nose landing gear was no longer being held in place and collapsed rearward into the fuselage, causing substantial damage to the aircraft.

Finally, the investigation also determined that, if aircraft operators do not provide pilots with all the possible tools and relevant information to assess runway suitability for landing, pilots may not evaluate all potential threats and may make decisions based on incomplete or conflicting information.

Following the occurrence, WestJet Encore issued a revision to the Quick Reference Handbook on 14 February 2020 that included changes to contaminated runway operations. The Terrace-Kitimat Airport Society issued a memo informing staff of changes to its Winter Maintenance Plan, which aligned the procedures with Issue 04 of Transport Canada’s Advisory Circular 302-013: Airport Winter Maintenance and Planning.

See the investigation page for more information.

Porter Airlines extends pilot simulator training agreement with FlightSafety International, including new E2 aircraft

TORONTO, July 22, 2021 /CNW/ – Porter Airlines has finalized a new eight-year agreement with FlightSafety International to continue as the airline’s exclusive pilot training partner. This includes the installation of North America’s first E2 flight simulator to support Porter’s recent order for up to 80 Embraer E195-E2 aircraft.

Porter Airlines extends pilot simulator training agreement with FlightSafety International, including new E2 aircraft (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines extends pilot simulator training agreement with FlightSafety International, including new E2 aircraft (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines extends pilot simulator training agreement with FlightSafety International, including new E2 aircraft (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines extends pilot simulator training agreement with FlightSafety International, including new E2 aircraft (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)

The new simulator comes online in April 2022, ahead of Porter beginning E2 operations in the second half of next year. It is expanding its current regional network to serve destinations across North America, including the west coast, southern U.S., Mexico and the Caribbean.

Porter is continuing its 15-year relationship with FlightSafety International at the company’s Toronto Learning Centre. Over 650 Porter pilots will receive ongoing training at the facility for the E2 and De Havilland Dash 8-400.

“This agreement is an example of how Porter’s investment in new aircraft is creating new jobs and opportunities for Canada’s aerospace industry,” said Michael Deluce, president and CEO of Porter Airlines. “FlightSafety is a long-standing partner of Porter’s and our pilots will continue receiving the very best training with them for years to come.”

The flight simulators that Porter uses at FlightSafety are certified to the highest Transport Canada standards. Pilots are able to experience all aspects of real-world flying, including full motion simulation and actual airport environments, in a controlled setting. This allows for the most realistic and effective training environment, including safely dealing with unusual and complex scenarios.

Porter and FlightSafety have additional agreements for training flight attendants and maintenance engineers on the Dash 8-400. This is part of an overall training program that ensures Porter team members are among the safest in the world.

About Porter Airlines

Porter Airlines provides a warm and effortless approach to hospitality, restoring glamour and refinement to air travel. Porter is an Official 4 Star Airline® in the World Airline Star Rating®.

The airline currently offers flights to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Fredericton, Saint John, Moncton, Halifax, St. John’s, Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Timmins, Windsor, New York (Newark), Chicago (Midway), Boston and Washington (Dulles), and has seasonal flights to Mt. Tremblant, Que., Muskoka, Ont., Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Stephenville, N.L.

Visit www.flyporter.com