Category: Sunwing

Sunwing expanding operations from Victoria with the addition of two new flight services

Provided by Sunwing Vacations Inc/GlobeNewswire

TORONTO, Sept. 16, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Sunwing is offering Victoria residents more options to explore the sunny south this winter with the addition of new weekly flights to Mazatlán and Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo. Travellers can fly to Mazatlán on Saturdays starting December 21, 2019 until March 28, 2020 and to Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo on Sundays starting December 22, 2019 until March 29, 2020. With the addition of these two new flights, Victoria residents can now choose from four tropical destinations this winter including returning favourites Huatulco and Los Cabos.

Known as the ‘Pearl of the Pacific’, Mazatlán is characterized by its picturesque coastal landscapes and neoclassical architecture. Travellers can spend their days strolling down the cobblestone streets of Old Mazatlán or walking along the pristine beaches of the Golden Zone. Vacationers who choose to visit Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo can enjoy two destinations in one; Ixtapa is famous for its stylish beach clubs, while Zihuatanejo offers a more laidback and artsy atmosphere.

Andrew Dawson, President of Tour Operations for Sunwing, commented on the news, “We are excited to be returning to Victoria International Airport and expanding our operations in the region with the addition of two new flight services this winter. We’re sure the destinations of Mazatlán and Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo will be well received by residents of the Greater Victoria region.”

“We’re pleased to welcome Sunwing’s new flights to Mazatlán and Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo and we appreciate their commitment to this market,” said Geoff Dickson, President and Chief Executive of the Victoria Airport Authority. “We know the Greater Victoria community enjoys travelling to sun-spot destinations during the winter months and the convenience these new non-stop services allows them to get to their destination sooner to start enjoying their vacations.”

Travellers who choose to take advantage of the new weekly flight service to Mazatlán could  stay at El Cid Castilla Beach, with activities and amenities for all ages including water slides and banana boat rides (at an extra cost). Another popular resort in Mazatlán is the newly-renovated Riu Emerald Bay. This recently-modernized, top-rated family resort offers an expansive pool complex and sweeping Pacific Ocean views from the majority of its rooms. In Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo, vacationers can stay at top-rated family resort Azul Ixtapa Resort, home to its own mini water park and action-packed kids club.

All Sunwing vacation packages from Victoria include direct flights* with a generous complimentary 23kg checked luggage allowance and onward local transfers together with the services of a local Sunwing Experiences representative. For additional perks, including priority check-in and security line access**, customers can upgrade to Elite Plus from just $50 per sector.

For more information or to book, visit www.sunwing.ca or contact your travel agent.

* Flights to Mazatlán and Ixtapa-Zihuatanejo are operated by Viva Aerobus.
**Available at select Canadian airports.

WestJet cancels 10 Sask. flights to sunny locations after Max 8 grounding continues

News provided by CBC News – link to full story and updates

Flights to Phoenix, Cancun, Puerto Vallarta affected, not known when flights will return to normal

CBC News · Posted: Sep 10, 2019

A Boeing 737 Max 8 in Westjet’s hangar in Calgary. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Saskatchewan travellers looking to fly south for the winter this year might be in for a bumpy ride.

This week, WestJet announced flight cancellations from airports in Regina and Saskatoon. 

The company blamed the disruptions on Boeing’s 737 Max 8 jets. The planes were pulled from service by Transport Canada after 346 people were killed in crashes involving Indonesia’s Lion Air in 2018 and Ethiopian Airlines in March of this year. Both incidents involved the Max 8.

“Guests who hold a current reservation impacted by this update will be notified proactively if there are changes to their itinerary,” wrote WestJet spokesperson Morgan Bell. “Where possible, we will work to substitute other aircraft directly onto a route and will not impact a guests itinerary so notifications will not be necessary.”

The following flights will be affected:

  • Saskatoon-Phoenix: Three weekly flights suspended.
  • Regina-Orlando: One weekly flight suspended.
  • Regina-Phoenix: Three weekly flights suspended.
  • Regina-Cancun: suspended one weekly flight in November. WestJet will operate one weekly flight in December.
  • Regina–Puerto Vallarta: One weekly flight suspended. WestJet will continue to operate once weekly in November. Two weekly flights will be suspended in December.

Air Canada and Sunwing had already announced plans to pull all Max 8s from its schedule until next year.

WestJet said the suspensions are temporary and that flights will resume once the Max 8 is cleared to return to service. However, that won’t happen until January 5, at the earliest. 

Transport Canada hasn’t said when the ban will be lifted.

Boeing says a system designed to help keep the Max 8 stable seemed to be a factor in each crash.

Many other governing bodies, including China, the United States and the European aviation authority, have banned the planes from their airspace.

WestJet currently owns 13 Max 8 jets, accounting for 10 per cent of its fleet.

Many other flights from Calgary, Winnipeg and Toronto have also been affected.

With files from Ian Hanomansing

No serious injuries after Sunwing landing gear malfunction

News provided by Toronto City News – link to full story

BY Toronto City News Staff, 8 September 2019

Passenger video from inside Sunwing flight 272 returning from Cancun shows passengers clinging on to seats as the plane rumbles down the runway following a malfunction while landing.

No serious injuries but a lot of anxious moments after a Sunwing airliner suffered a malfunction while landing at Pearson Airport.

Peel Regional Police say Sunwing flight 272, which was returning from Cancun, Mexico, suffered what appeared to be a blown tire around 3:15 p.m. Sunday afternoon.

Video from inside the aircraft shows nervous passengers clinging to the back of the seats in front of them as the plane rumbles down the runway upon landing.

VIEWER VIDEO: A Sunwing passenger captures terrifying moments on his flight back from Cancun- the tire on his plane apparently blew while landing at Toronto’s Pearson airport tonight. We are hearing plane windows are broken & ceilings are cracked- thankfully no injuries reported. pic.twitter.com/VBOaBL5E6r

Tina Yazdani (@TinaYazdani) September 8, 2019

One passenger tells 680 NEWS at least one person was hit in the head by items that fell from the overhead compartment. There are also reports that the interior of the cabin may have been damaged.

Police say fire and emergency personnel assisted passengers as they boarded buses to be taken to the terminal.

In a statement to CityNews, Sunwing confirms the aircraft, which was operated by Swift Air, ruptured a tire upon landing. Further inspection revealed a hydraulic leak from the same landing gear.

Airlines won’t fly Max 8 in Canada until 2020, at the earliest: How that affects you

News provided by CBC News – link to full story

Air Canada, Sunwing and now WestJet have said they won’t be flying their Max 8 planes this year

CBC News · Posted: Sep 05, 2019

A WestJet Boeing 737 Max 8 is seen at the Calgary International Airport in this file photo. (Janos Englert)

Calgary-based WestJet has announced it will keep its Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft out of service during its winter schedule from Nov. 4 to Jan. 5, making it the latest Canadian carrier to commit to keeping the planes grounded until early 2020, at least.

Transport Canada has yet to give the jets permission to fly after Max 8 planes were grounded across the world in March, following two fatal crashes.

WestJet says the changes will show up on its website starting Sept. 8 and those with reservations affected by the update will be notified of any changes to their itinerary.

Air Canada and Sunwing Airlines have already announced they won’t be flying their Max 8 planes until next year.

Travel agent Lesley Keyter says those with bookings that might be affected should be diligent about keeping up to date on the status of their flights.

“If they’ve booked it directly, themselves, with the airline, they need to keep an eye out, keep their booking number, keep going to the website, keep checking their flights,” she said.

She also advised to make sure your email is entered properly with the airline’s booking system so that you receive any notifications that they send.

WestJet says it will work to substitute other aircraft, where possible, and notes it has maintained 98 per cent of total, planned departures since the Max 8 planes were grounded.

Aviation analyst Rick Erickson isn’t expecting major disruptions.

“They’ve been doing this all throughout the whole of the summer,” he said. “That means that they’re fairly well equipped to be able to operate with the challenge of quite a few number of seats no longer in their network.”

There’s still been no word on when the Max 8 might be recertified to fly in Canadian airspace.

With files from Dave Gilson

Westjet drops 737 Max 8 from busy holiday-season flight schedule

News provided by CBC News – link to full story and video

WATCH: Videos

Decision means no Canadian airlines expected to use aircraft until 2020 even if it’s cleared to fly

Ian Hanomansing · CBC News · Sep 04, 2019

One of Westjet’s grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 jets, seen in the airline’s hangar in Calgary. Transport Canada has not yet indicated when the passenger planes could be cleared to fly again. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Forty one aircraft, three Canadian airlines and almost six months out of service. The grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 is affecting Canadian flights from coast to coast, and for Westjet passengers it’s now clear that impact will continue through the busy end-of-year holiday season.

Transport Canada has not yet given the jets permission to fly, but even if it does so before the end of the year, CBC News has learned Westjet will not be including the Max 8 jets in its holiday-season schedule, one of the peak travel times of the year.

Air Canada and Sunwing had already announced they won’t be flying their Max 8s until next year.

It’s possible the Boeing jets may be recertified to fly before the end of 2019 — Transport Canada isn’t saying when that might happen. But Brian Znotins, Westjet’s vice-president in charge of scheduling at the company’s headquarters in Calgary, says his airline made the decision because it needed to give passengers some certainty in making holiday bookings.

If the Max 8 is allowed to fly in December, at most Znotins says the airline might consider an occasional flight to ease demand.

“It’s a little harder to unmix the cake at that point, but we would look at peak days, the Friday before Christmas [for example] where we can still sell seats and we’ll put the airplane back in.”

No-fly decision

Until now, very little has been heard from Canadian airlines about the ongoing impact of the Max 8’s problems. But Westjet agreed to talk to CBC’s The National about the effects of the grounding on the airline’s operations.

The issue with the Max 8  began with two disasters: A total of 346 people killed in crashes involving Indonesia’s Lion Air in October 2018 and Ethiopian Airlines in March of this year.

A Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8, parked on the tarmac of Soekarno Hatta International airport near Jakarta, Indonesia. All Max 8 jets, about 350 in service around the world, have been grounded since March this year. (Willy Kurniawan/Reuters)

Investigators were troubled by the similarity between the crashes. Pilots on both planes appeared to be struggling to maintain control of their aircraft when they went down.

Boeing has acknowledged the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), designed to activate automatically to help keep a plane stable, seemed to be a factor in each crash. It appears erroneous air speed data triggered MCAS, which tried to push the nose of the jet down to increase speed while the pilots fought to counteract it.

In the days after the first crash on Oct. 29, 2018, some U.S. pilots complained Boeing hadn’t revealed that MCAS was embedded in the Max 8’s software. Speaking publicly for the first time on this issue, Westjet’s vice-president of flight operations, Scott Wilson, told CBC News that Westjet shared that concern.

“Our job as pilots is to know and understand the aircraft so that we can apply that knowledge in a normal and not normal situation,” he says. Not being told about MCAS, “created a bit of a trust deficit. There’s no doubt about it.”

Wilson adds that he made that erosion of trust clear to Boeing. “Absolutely. And they are well aware they’ve got to basically rebuild that gap.”

After the Lion Air disaster, he says the three Canadian airlines that fly the Max 8 worked with Boeing and Transport Canada to review pilot training and procedures, what Wilson called “a made-in-Canada solution.” He adds that the airlines were confident its pilots could fly the jet safely as a result.

But then on March 10 came the second catastrophic crash, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. Within hours, Wilson says Transport Canada was again in contact with Air Canada, Sunwing and Westjet, sharing information about the tragedy and assessing the safety of the jets.

An emergency crew works at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Max 8 crash near Bishoftu, south of Addis Ababa, on March 11. All 157 people aboard the aircraft were killed. (Mulugeta Ayene/Associated Press)

“Obviously we’d never move an aircraft ever without a 100-per-cent assurance of its safety … and the information that we had at the time led us to believe that at that moment, that there was no increased risk to operating the aircraft,” Wilson says.

But governments around the world began taking action. The day after the Ethiopian crash, China banned the Max 8 from its airspace, and the next day the European aviation authority did the same. Three days after the crash, Canada and then the United States followed suit. 

At the time, Canada’s Minister of Transport Marc Garneau said there was new satellite data on the Ethiopian crash, “suggesting a possible although unproven similarity in the flight profile of the Lion Air aircraft.” 

Wilson explains that the data appeared to show that MCAS played a role in both the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines disasters. It wasn’t conclusive, but it was enough to ban the Max from carrying passengers in Canadian airspace.

All Boeing 737 Max 8s — about 350 planes flown by more than 50 airlines around the world — have been grounded ever since, as the manufacturer works to fix the problem and prove to aviation officials that the aircraft is safe.

Scott Wilson, Westjet’s vice-president of flight operations, in front of a grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 in the airline’s Calgary hangar. He says issues around software in the jet have created ‘a trust deficit’ between pilots and Boeing. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Challenging logistics

For Westjet, the grounding has left 13 jets parked at airports from Vancouver to Toronto, about 10 per cent of the airline’s seats. That has created an ongoing challenge for the airline’s schedulers and maintenance team.

The person in charge of maintenance, John Kelly, says his airline’s Max 8s are essentially ready to fly — their fluids are checked every 48 hours, and once a week each jet is powered up, taxis and then is parked again.

Watch: CBC NewsKeeping the 737 Max 8 flight-ready

Westjet’s vice-president of technical operations, John Kelly, takes CBC’s Ian Hanomansing into the wheel well of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 to explain how the airline is keeping the aircraft flight-ready while they’re grounded. 0:40

Standing in the gleaming Westjet hanger in Calgary, Kelly explained that the biggest challenge in this grounding hasn’t been the maintenance involved in keeping the Max 8s on standby, but the need to get more hours from the rest of the airline’s fleet.

“We pulled some planes out of heavy maintenance to help fly the schedule. We’re doing a lot more work on the other airplanes to keep them healthy and keep them flying.”

Among the work that’s been deferred is the job of putting new seats in Premium class of the airline’s older 737s, for example.

Mechanics do maintenance work on a Boeing 737 Max 8 in Westjet’s hangar in Calgary. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

Making planes available is just the first part of the puzzle. Then comes reworking the flight schedule.

If you want a sense of the complexity of running an airline, walk through its operations centre. For Westjet it’s a room about the size of a gymnasium, filled with people tracking planes, watching the weather and calculating flight plans. When CBC News visited the centre, one of the scheduling issues the team was dealing with was fog in Prince George that had led to a two hour delay, which in turn affected that plane’s upcoming Vancouver-Victoria-Vancouver trip.

Weather problems are a fact of life for airlines. The impact of removing 13 jets for an indefinite period is infinitely more complicated.

That’s been the responsibility of Brian Znotins. With the uncertainty over when the jets will be returned to service, he has revised the airline’s flight schedule five times.

He compares the process to building a house. “You take away 7 per cent of the bricks and you still want to build that house and you have to get pretty creative.”

Brian Znotins oversees long-term scheduling for Westjet. He says uncertainty around when the 737 Max 8 will be able to return to passenger service has required the airline to revamp its schedules a number of times in recent weeks. (Mia Sheldon/CBC)

In a July 29 interview, WestJet chief executive Ed Sims told CBC News that the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8 is having a “substantial negative impact” on the airline. He declined to give specifics on the financial hit, but said the grounding has forced WestJet to increase spending on fuel and cut routes.

One summer route — Halifax to Paris — was cancelled for the season, for example. A direct flight from Vancouver to Regina has also been suspended. Some daytime flights have been moved to overnight. But with its older 737s flying more often, Znotins says Westjet has been able to maintain 98 per cent of what would have been its schedule with the Max 8s in the air.

It’s a similar story at Air Canada. The bigger airline had a fleet of 24 Max 8s, and was expecting 12 more by the end of June. Asked about the impact of the grounding on its operations, Air Canada directed CBC to its most recent quarterly report, which states the airline has managed to cover “97 per cent of our planned flying” without those aircraft. 

Aviation analyst Rick Ericksen says he’s impressed with how Canadian airlines are coping and how all three have handled the grounding. But he says that aside from the lost revenue, the airlines have very little excess aircraft capacity left at the moment to deal with any other problems that may arise.

Awaiting clearance

The question remains: when will the Max 8 be cleared to fly again?

All Transport Canada will say is that it “will not lift the current flight restriction … until it is fully satisfied that all concerns have been addressed by the manufacturer and U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, and adequate flight crew procedures and training are in place.”

Air Canada has announced it won’t fly the Max 8 any sooner than Jan. 8, 2020.

For Sunwing, it’s May. 

Westjet may be the best positioned of the three Canadian airlines to get the Max 8s up quickly once the flight restriction is lifted. Its Max pilots have been active, flying the airline’s older-model 737s. Kelly, in charge of maintenance, says after a software update the Max 8s should be ready to fly.

But vice-president of flight operations Scott Wilson concedes there is another challenge the airlines will face: attracting passengers who may be reluctant to fly on a plane that’s suffered two recent crashes.


Watch The National’s story about how the Boeing 737 Max 8 grounding is affecting operations at Westjet:

We go in-depth with WestJet to find out how the grounding of its 737 Max fleet is hitting customers, and the airline itself.

Mirabel charter airline woos job seekers with free flights

News provided by Montreal Gazette – link to full story and updates

Nolinor Aviation holds an open house with a difference in an effort to “open some eyes” in an increasingly competitive job market.

FRÉDÉRIC TOMESCO, Montreal Gazette, September 5, 2019

Nolinor vice-president Marco Prud’homme inside one of the company’s planes undergoing maintenance in Mirabel. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

Talk about hopping the extra mile.

On Saturday morning, Quebec charter-flight operator Nolinor Aviation will fly South Shore job seekers from St-Hubert airport to Mirabel — and back — as part of an “open house day” aimed at filling more than 20 aircraft mechanic positions.

The company is hoping the short trip to the lower Laurentians aboard one of its Boeing 737 jets, as well as on-site discussions with employees and recruiters, will make it stand out in an increasingly competitive job market.

“Maybe it’ll open some eyes,” Marco Prud’homme, a vice-president of the company, said a telephone interview. “It’s a 20-minute flight. If this was a straight line it would be even faster, but we’ll have to go around the island of Montreal because of the air traffic in and out of Dorval.”

Such are the lengths that some employers feel compelled to go to in a bid to recruit staff in Quebec, where the unemployment rate continues to set record lows.

That labour shortage you keep reading about? It’s a reality for Nolinor.

“This summer we had to refuse several contracts because we simply did not have the personnel to operate flights,” Prud’homme said.

Founded in 1992, family-owned Nolinor has carved out a niche by running ferry flights for mining companies to some of Canada’s most remote regions.

As part of a 10-year contract with gold miner Agnico Eagle, it links Montreal to Val d’Or and company mines in Nunavut, operating same-day, round-trip flights several times a week.

Nolinor also runs charter flights for sports franchises such as the Montreal Alouettes and the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League, as well as the Laval Rocket, the American Hockey League affiliate of the Canadiens.

Besides the aircraft mechanic positions, Nolinor wants to fill dozens of ground and administrative jobs that haven’t even been advertised yet, Prud’homme said. Wages for mechanics fresh out of school start at about $18.50 an hour, plus benefits.

“There’s a lot of poaching going on in the industry,” says Nolinor vice-president Marco Prud’homme. PIERRE OBENDRAUF / MONTREAL GAZETTE

This is the second open house day that Nolinor is conducting this year. About two months ago, company recruiters hosted 120 candidates in Mirabel, filling about 20 flight attendant positions.

“There’s a lot of poaching going on in the industry,” Prud’homme said. “Just today, we had one pilot leave us. For a young person that wants to work in air transport, now is a great time. Companies like Sunwing Airlines, Air Transat and Air Canada are hiring a lot, whether you’re a co-pilot or a mechanic. We’re sort of in the middle of the food chain here.”

Mirabel-based Nolinor now has about 220 employees. Current job openings also include crew schedulers, flight attendants and pilots, according to the company’s website.

Nolinor’s drive to recruit pilots is facing global competition. According to a 2018 forecast by Montreal-based flight-simulator maker CAE, airlines will need to hire more than 270,000 pilots over the next decade amid an expected doubling in passenger travel.

Canadian regulations on crew fatigue and pilot flight times are also having an impact on staffing plans. Prud’homme estimates his company will need as much as 35 per cent more staff to meet the new rules, which are due to take effect by the end of the year.

“When everyone needs to hire at the same time, it’s a problem,” he says.

Nolinor’s business has benefited from a mad scramble among carriers such as Canada’s Sunwing for spare aircraft following the crash of two Boeing 737 Max jets in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

With transportation authorities worldwide ordering the grounding of all 737 Max jets, Sunwing — a Max operator — hired Nolinor to perform replacement flights between Toronto and the Caribbean.

“After the 737 Max crisis, we became swamped,” Prud’homme said.

And although Nolinor’s contract with Sunwing is set to expire next week, the executive isn’t convinced the relationship will end there.

“People are talking about a return to service of the Max in the coming months, but who can really say that with confidence?” he asked. “Maybe we’ll end up doing other flights for Sunwing for the Christmas season.”

Taxiing Sunwing 737 twice returned to gate after fuel spills

News provided by Flight Global – link to full story and updates

30 August 2019 by David Kaminski-Morrow, London, FlightGlobal

Pilots of a Sunwing Airlines Boeing 737-800 twice returned to the gate to deal with fuel spills during taxiing ahead of a service from Portugal’s Faro airport.

The aircraft, bound for Katowice in Poland on 5 August, had already experienced a spill during refuelling when the right-hand main tank was overfilled.

Transportation Safety Board of Canada states that ground personnel dealt with the spill with a firefighting vehicle in attendance.

But as the aircraft (C-FTOH) taxied out for the departure, says the board, it experienced two other fuel spills.

“Each time the aircraft returned [to] the gate and the crew shut down the engines for clean-up and ground maintenance crew examination,” it adds.

“Eventually the overflow stopped and the maintenance crew performed fuel balancing of the fuel tanks.”

Investigators state that the jet subsequently departed Faro without further incident. None of the 180 passengers and six crew members was injured. The aircraft, built in 2009, was being sub-wet-leased at the time by the Polish division of Czech operator Smartwings.

Sunwing returns to North Bay for eighth consecutive season with new flights to Cayo Santa Maria

Provided by Sunwing Vacations Inc./Globe Newswire

August 29, 2019 Source: Sunwing Vacations Inc.

Cayo Santa Maria
Cayo Santa Maria Sunwing Vacations Inc.

TORONTO, Aug. 29, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Good news for residents of North Bay and the surrounding region looking to travel to sunny Cuba this winter, Sunwing will be returning to North Bay with a new flight service to Cayo Santa Maria. Vacationers will be able to take advantage of weekly departures direct from North Bay Jack Garland Airport between December 17, 2019 and April 7, 2020. 

Travellers can look forward to a quintessential Cuban beach getaway when they vacation in Cayo Santa Maria. A favourite of Canadian sun-seekers, Cayo Santa Maria is lined with pristine white-sand shores, crystal-clear turquoise waters and a wide range of resorts for all travel styles. Vacationers can explore all that Cayo Santa Maria has to offer on a Sunwing Experiences excursion, whether they want to scuba dive in the deep blue or drive a Jeep through the scenic countryside. 

President of Tour Operations for Sunwing, Andrew Dawson, welcomed the news, “We are excited to be returning to North Bay for an eighth consecutive season and offering residents new flights to explore this exciting destination this winter. Cayo Santa Maria is a favourite destination for Canadian travellers and we’re sure vacationers from the North Bay region will be eager to take advantage of this sunny retreat.”

Airport Manager for North Bay Jack Garland Airport Corporation, Jack Santerre, also commented on the news, “North Bay Jack Garland Airport (YYB) is thrilled to welcome back Sunwing Airlines for its eighth consecutive season and is pleased the airline is providing a competitive, high quality, travel option for the Cayo Santa Maria sun destination for the North Bay regional market.” 

Families that choose to experience Cayo Santa Maria this winter may choose to stay at the Starfish Cayo Santa Maria, which features spacious accommodations together with complimentary baby, kids and teen clubs. Another great choice for travellers with tots is Memories Paraiso, a resort surrounded by lush foliage offering special rates for children, a supervised kids club and a kids pool. Couples looking for a sophisticated getaway may prefer the award-winning Royalton Cayo Santa Maria, an adults only oasis situated on a white-sand beach featuring varied dining and elegant rooms. 

Sun-seekers can also enjoy a host of benefits when they book their tropical getaway before September 6th for travel between December 18th, 2019 and April 30th, 2020. The tour operator is offering the ultimate package deal including complimentary Price Drop Guarantee with up to $600 cash back per couple*, reduced deposits of $50 per person, exclusive free perks on all new bookings to top-rated adult, top-rated family and top-rated luxury resorts with the best price guaranteed** and savings of up to 25% on select winter vacation packages.

All Sunwing vacation packages include return flights on Sunwing Airlines where passengers can sit back and relax while on board, with award-winning inflight service, complimentary non-alcoholic beverage service and buy on board selection of snacks and light meals including the Tex Mex Grilled Chicken Wrap inspired by Food Network Canada Celebrity Chef, Lynn Crawford. Passengers also benefit from a generous complimentary 23kg checked luggage allowance. For additional perks, including priority check-in and security line access***, customers can upgrade to Elite Plus from just $50 per sector.

For more information or to book, visit www.sunwing.ca or contact your travel agent.

* All claims are subject to a $50 per person admin fee; each passenger must register within seven days after booking to qualify for the Price Drop Guarantee promotion.
** An ongoing promotion where Sunwing will match a competitor’s published price which must be available at the time of booking. 
***Available at select Canadian airports. 

Sunwing returns to Sault Ste. Marie for the 12th consecutive season with new flights to Varadero, Cuba

Provided by Sunwing Vacation Inc/Globe Newswire

August 29, 2019 SSunwing Vacations Inc.

Copy of Copy of Copy of new blog size -   (3)
Varadero Sunwing Vacations Inc.

TORONTO, Aug. 29, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Good news for residents of Sault Ste. Marie looking to trade snow for sun this winter; Sunwing is returning to Sault Ste. Marie Airport for the 12th  consecutive season and offering weekly flights to VaraderoCuba for the first time; operating weekly between  December 12, 2019 and April 9, 2020.

Vacationers who choose to head south this winter can look forward to a quintessential Cuban beach getaway in Varadero. Home to some of the best beaches in the Caribbean, Varadero’s pristine white-sand shores and friendly people have made this tropical destination a long-time favourite for Canadian travellers. Whether sun-seekers are dreaming of a family-friendly getaway or an adults only escape, Varadero has something to offer everyone. 

President of Tour Operations for Sunwing, Andrew Dawson, commented on the news, “We are delighted that our service out of Sault Ste. Marie has been so well-received. As a result of ongoing support from residents, we’re excited to be returning to Sault Ste. Marie Airport for the 12th consecutive season and providing convenient access to one of the most popular vacation destinations this winter.” 

Travellers who take advantage of this new flight service can choose from a range of resorts for all ages, tastes and budgets. Families will love Grand Memories Varadero, nestled on a calm stretch of beach with activities for everyone including a kids club featuring popular characters Toopy and Binoo™. Vacationers planning an adults only getaway can stay at Melia Las Antillas, offering a relaxing ambiance with convenient amenities and spacious accommodations. Iberostar Tainos is another popular choice in Varadero, with plenty of resort-offered activities like snorkelling and dance lessons. 

Sun-seekers can also enjoy a host of benefits when they book their tropical getaway before September 6th for travel between December 18th, 2019 and April 30th, 2020. The tour operator is offering the ultimate package deal including a complimentary Price Drop Guarantee with up to $600 cash back per couple*, reduced deposits of $50 per person, exclusive free perks on all new bookings to top-rated adult, top-rated family and top-rated luxury resorts with the best price guaranteed** and savings of up to 25% on select winter vacation packages. 

All Sunwing vacation packages include return flights on Sunwing Airlines where passengers can sit back and relax while on board, with award-winning inflight service, complimentary non-alcoholic beverage service and buy on board selection of snacks and light meals including the Tex Mex Grilled Chicken Wrap inspired by Food Network Canada Celebrity Chef, Lynn Crawford. Passengers also benefit from a generous complimentary 23kg checked luggage allowance. For additional perks, including priority check-in and security line access***, customers can upgrade to Elite Plus from just $50 per sector.

For more information or to book, visit www.sunwing.ca or contact your travel agent.

* All claims are subject to a $50 per person admin fee; each passenger must register within seven days after booking to qualify for the Price Drop Guarantee promotion.
** An ongoing promotion where Sunwing will match a competitor’s published price which must be available at the time of booking.
***Available at select Canadian airports. 

Sunwing returns to the island of Tobago this winter following successful inaugural season

Provided by Sunwing Vacations Inc/Globe Newswire

TORONTO, Aug. 19, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Following an immensely successful inaugural season in 2018/2019, Sunwing has announced it will be returning to Tobago this winter with weekly direct flights from Toronto. Sunwing is the only Canadian leisure carrier to offer direct flights to this tropical destination, with flights operating weekly from December 19, 2019 until April 16, 2020. Sunwing’s direct flight service to Tobago has had a positive effect in the island’s tourism industry, with arrivals increasing throughout Sunwing’s inaugural season.

President of Tour Operations for Sunwing, Andrew Dawson, commented on the news, “We are excited to be returning to the island of Tobago for a second season and offering residents of the Greater Toronto Area with even more ways to Vacation Better. We’re certain that the island’s lush landscapes, untouched beaches and tropical rainforests will continue to be a big draw for our customers this coming season.”

“The return of Sunwing’s winter service to Tobago is great news for tourism in Tobago,” added Louis Lewis, CEO for the Tobago Tourism Agency. “This follows a very strong performance for the inaugural season in 2018/19 where our overall arrivals increased by 10%. We welcome the service and look forward to building a strong partnership with the airline to support growing arrivals from the Canadian market.”

Sunwing Vacations Inc

The smaller of two islands that make up the nation of Trinidad and Tobago, Tobago is known for its lush landscapes, breathtaking beaches and vibrant culture. Vacationers who choose to visit this picturesque destination can spend their time soaking up the sun on pristine beaches, snorkelling alongside exotic marine life or discovering the island’s unique tropical landscapes on a Sunwing Experiences excursion.

Travellers can choose from numerous resorts on the island with options for all ages, tastes and budgets. The family-friendly Starfish Tobago Resort offers comfortable accommodations in a picturesque tropical setting, with an action-packed kids club and delicious dining options. Another popular resort on the island is Magdalena Grand Beach and Golf Resort. This luxurious property is located on an 18-hole championship course designed by the PGA and offers breathtaking ocean views.