Flair Airlines Extends Schedule Through Summer 2022

Canada’s favorite ULCC is confident in travel demand growth over the coming year and expands schedule in core Canadian and US markets

Edmonton, Alberta, September 9, 2021 – Flair Airlines, Canada’s only true ultra low-cost carrier (ULCC), continues its surge to bring low fares to Canadians and has extended its flight schedule through Summer 2022 in core Canadian and US markets.

“As we grow our fleet and expand our service, we see the demand for Flair’s low fare travel continuing to explode across Canada. We are absolutely focused on rescuing Canadians from the bloated prices they have long suffered in flying,” says Stephen Jones, President and CEO, Flair Airlines. “Flair is committed to helping reunite families and make travel accessible for everyone, and our schedule extension will help passengers prepare for 2022 by knowing they can explore and connect without breaking the bank.”

The schedule expansion extends the booking period into Summer 2022. Many year-round and seasonal routes will see an increase in service including flights departing from Edmonton (YEG), Kelowna (YLW), Halifax (YHZ), Kitchener (YKF), Abbotsford (YXX), Winnipeg (YWG), Toronto (YYZ), Saint John (YSJ), Vancouver (YVR), Calgary (YYC), Victoria (YYJ), Charlottetown (YYG), Thunder Bay (YQT), and Montreal (YUL).

Flair’s confidence in Canadian travel continuing to grow in 2022 is reflected in the ultra-low fares where cost efficiency and demand allow for pricing to start at just $29 CAD one-way on some routes. All routes and schedule details can be viewed at https://www.flyflair.com. More low fares and exciting summer route announcements will be coming soon! Be among the first to know by signing up for Flair’s newsletter https://www.flyflair.com/newsletter.

Flair is rapidly growing to serve Canadians with low fare flights, the extended schedule allows for more efficient planning for customers and airline partners. Deliveries of new Boeing 737 MAX aircraft throughout 2021 and 2022 continue to grow the fleet as Flair achieves its goal of 50 aircraft in five years. Flair continues to bring more jobs to the market and is hiring more staff and flight crew as it meets the growth demands of the airline.

About Flair Airlines

Flair Airlines is Canada’s only independent Ultra Low-Cost Carrier (ULCC) and is on a mission to liberate the lives of Canadians by providing affordable air travel that connects them to the people and experiences they love. With an expanding fleet of Boeing 737 aircraft, Flair is growing to serve 26 cities across Canada and North America. For more information, please visit http://www.flyflair.com

Porter Airlines returns to the air

TORONTO, Sept. 8, 2021 /CNW/ – Porter Airlines officially returns to the skies today, almost 18 months after suspending flights due to COVID-19 public health and travel restrictions.

Porter Airlines officially returns to the skies today, almost 18 months after suspending flights due to COVID-19 public health and travel restrictions. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines officially returns to the skies today, almost 18 months after suspending flights due to COVID-19 public health and travel restrictions. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)

Flights to Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa and Thunder Bay are the first to restart. Other Canadian destinations starting within the next 10 days are Halifax, Quebec City, St. John’s, NL, and Moncton. U.S. destinations in Boston, Chicago, New York and Washington return on Sept. 17. Flights to other year-round destinations are set to resume as of Oct. 6, with all routes currently available for booking. The initial flight schedule can be found at www.flyporter.com.

“Our passengers and team members have been waiting for this day to arrive,” said Michael Deluce, president and CEO, Porter Airlines. “We currently have over 900 team members who have put in countless hours to get everything ready for our return to service, with more being recalled or hired every week. Everyone at Porter is looking forward to welcoming passengers back and delivering our distinct style of service again.”

Toronto Mayor John Tory joins the celebrations at Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport.

Porter has strengthened its existing standards with a focus on high levels of sanitization in order to protect the health of its passengers and team members. More information about the Healthy Flights program can be found on Porter’s website.

In addition to Healthy Flights, Porter has also introduced a COVID-19 Vaccination Policy for its team members. To support a safe and healthy workplace and travel experience, team members must present a negative COVID-19 test administered within 72 hours of the start of their shift or be fully vaccinated. The Canadian federal government announced in August its intention to mandate vaccination for federally-regulated workers; once specific details are known, Porter’s policy may evolve.

Bookings made before Sept. 30, will be eligible to change or cancel with no fees. Passengers also have the option to book a flight with the Full Refund Option for $40 plus taxes. The Refund Option entitles customers to receive a refund, including base fare, taxes and fees, for their booking upon advance cancellation of their flight for any reason.

About Porter Airlines

Porter Airlines provides a warm and effortless approach to hospitality, restoring glamour and refinement to air travel. Porter is an Official 4 Star Airline® in the World Airline Star Rating®.

The airline currently offers flights to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Fredericton, Saint John, Moncton, Halifax, St. John’s, Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Timmins, Windsor, New York (Newark), Chicago (Midway), Boston and Washington (Dulles), and has seasonal flights to Mt. Tremblant, Que., Muskoka, Ont., Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Stephenville, N.L.

Visit www.flyporter.com or follow @porterairlines on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Details of growth plans to provide North America-wide service are available at flyporter.com. 

Flair Airlines President Apologizes For Delays, Confusion, At Halifax Airport

From Huddle Today – link to source story

Aug 25, 2021by Derek Montague

Jan Vasek. Image: Unsplash.

HALIFAX – The President and CEO of Flair Airlines is apologizing to Halifax passengers who were stranded after flights were cancelled, and the airline struggled to find accommodations. There were two such incidents in less than a week, that left passengers angry, confused, and reaching out to the media to share their stories.

On Monday night, a police officer even helped passengers find hotel rooms late at night.

“We apologize profusely to all of the customers who were disrupted recently, and there’s been quite a number; it’s not acceptable,” said Flair president Stephen Jones in an interview with Huddle. “The way that we have communicated in many cases has left people wondering what’s going on.”

“I also apologize to our staff for not having the right information in their hands to be able to provide customer service.”

Jones said, in the case of Monday’s cancelled flights and confusion, the company will be reaching out and offering $100 vouchers that can be used for Flair services.

Police Are Called to the Airport

If it wasn’t for the help of a Halifax police office, Sarah Dexter may not have found a hotel room for her and her friend Monday night. Dexter was one of many who was stranded at the Halifax Airport, after Flair Airlines, once again, cancelled flights.

According to Dexter and another stranded traveler, Rebecca Goodine, the police were called to the Halifax airport Monday night when at least one person got so upset with Flair that they started yelling and causing a scene.

One of the officers then stayed to help try and find hotels for the passengers, when the airline couldn’t do so.

“People were getting really upset,” recalls Goodine. “There was nothing violent or anything, but a guy was yelling, so a cop did come up and try to deescalate.”

“(A lone Flair employee) was the only one trying to call hotels, trying to get something set up for people. So, the police officer also tried calling hotels, which was very strange.”

Stephen Jones says much of the confusion stems from the fact that there is a shortage of vacancies at Halifax hotels now. He says the airline is still taking responsibility for not being prepared for the lack of available rooms.

“We could have understood ahead of time that there was limited accommodation available and being more prepared for the impact of the cancellation.”

Dexter was supposed to fly from Halifax to Kitchener/Waterloo in Ontario late Monday evening. But an afternoon email from Flair informed her that the flight was cancelled, due to “unforeseen maintenance.”

She and her friend drove to the Halifax airport anyway, because they were unable to get a hold of any Flair representatives on the phone. Once at the airport, the lineup was incredibly long at the Flair counter, with dozens of people looking to rebook their flights and find accommodations.

After waiting in line for roughly two hours, Dexter was told the next available flight to Kitchener/Waterloo wouldn’t be until Friday. Given that she was supposed to go back to work on Tuesday, this was not a good option.

“What happens if we come here Friday and the same thing happens?” Asks Dexter. “I don’t trust (Flair) to get us out of here at this point.”

According to Dexter, a Flair agent told her that a shuttle would take stranded passengers to a hotel for the night, but no email ever came. She also says the agent, who was working by herself through much of the chaos, could only find five available hotel rooms, which went to the elderly and people with small children first.

One of the Halifax police officers found Dexter and her friend at a hotel in Truro. While the cost of the hotel was taken care of (presumably by Flair), Dexter had to pay $120 out-of-pocket for the cab to Truro.  She will have to pay the same to get back to the airport on Tuesday. She will now have to submit her receipt to Flair in the hopes of being reimbursed.

Stephen Jones said customers should not be expected to pay out of pocket for transportation and accommodation.

“It varies from situation to situation but, no, as a standard practice we shouldn’t be asking people to pay $90 taxi fares to go to a different city to find a bed. We should be able to arrange transport and accommodation to meet all of the customers’ needs.”

Dexter and her friend will be able to leave Halifax Tuesday night because they chose to rebook through Air Canada, at a greater expense.

“The only reason we’re leaving is because we paid an arm and a leg for Air Canada tickets,” she said.

When asked if passengers would be reimbursed for buying new tickets on other airlines, Jones said it would depend on each individual situation.

“I want to look at them on a case-by-case basis…but we will do, not only what we’re obliged to do, we’ll do what’s right.”

Rebecca Goodine, however, will be staying with friends in Halifax for a few days. After her flight from Halifax to Montreal was cancelled on Monday. She says Flair told her they could fly her to Montreal next week, or she could accept a flight to Ottawa on Thursday – which she accepted.

“I agreed to the Thursday flight on the premise that I would have a hotel, and they said I would have a food allowance.”

“But then I was told there would be a shuttle to take us to this hotel and they didn’t say what hotel it was. So, a crowd started to gather for the hotel.”

Goodine said there was no shuttle and no hotel, so she ended up staying with friends in Halifax. In total, she spent ten hours at the airport. She also says Flair never gave her a food voucher, but instead got a water bottle, a Rice Krispy, a granola bar, and a pack of goldfish.

Take flight at the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum: A little-known gem near the Halifax airport

From Saltwire – link to source story

Helen Earley · August 12, 2021

Visitors can climb inside the flight deck of a BAE 146 when visiting the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, near the Halifax airport.
Visitors can climb inside the flight deck of a BAE 146 when visiting the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, near the Halifax airport. – Helen Earley

I knew it wasn’t “real,” but it felt so good to sit in an aircraft seat again.

I felt my shoulders relax as I shuffled to get comfortable in the narrow space between the armrests. Ensuring my seat was upright, I stowed my handbag underneath, and snapped my seatbelt into place around my hips, tugging firmly to ensure a snug fit.

I imagined the familiar smell of jet fuel, stale upholstery, coffee and chewing gum. I recalled those thrilling pre-take off butterflies; the sense of anticipation that marks the beginning of a new journey. I closed my eyes, then opened them again.

“Ready for takeoff!” I joked.

The Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum has a unique combination of civil and military aircrafts and artifacts. - Helen Earley
The Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum has a unique combination of civil and military aircrafts and artifacts. – Helen Earley

Our family is still not ready to travel outside Atlantic Canada, but as a former flight attendant and someone who loves everything about air travel, my hunger for all things aviation was satiated at the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, located near the Halifax International Airport.about:blank

This volunteer-led museum, which has been operating since 1986 in a former Nova Scotia Tourist Bureau, is the most comprehensive aviation museum east of Ottawa, uniquely dedicated to both civilian and military aviation history. Its location is marked by a cheerful jet, partially tucked away behind the bushes on the side of the 102 Highway.

Board member and volunteer Sean Ryan, who also serves as Director for Air Operations for Nova Scotia’s annual air show, Air Show Atlantic, told us that since the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in local visitors to the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum.

“We are seeing families who either didn’t know we existed and were out looking for something to do or driving by, wondering what the jet was all about,” he explained.

“We had one family, they had been driving by for 20 years, back and forth to Enfield and thought, ‘we’re going to go have a look,’ and they couldn’t believe what was here.”


If you go

  • Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum
  • 20 Sky Blvd Goffs NS B2T 1K3
  • www.acamuseum.ca
  • Phone: (902) 873-3773

A look inside

Formerly a tourist bureau, the wood-pannelled room now houses the Silver Dart gallery. - Helen Earley
Formerly a tourist bureau, the wood-pannelled room now houses the Silver Dart gallery. – Helen Earley

The first gallery feels very much like the 1970s, with wood-panelled walls, a sloping ceiling, and geometric lines. This was the former tourist bureau which, we were told, also contained large fish tanks in addition to tourist information before it was transformed into a museum.about:blank

Here, we marvelled at a replica of the Silver Dart, the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to fly in Canada. Further treasures included an interesting model of Halifax’s first aerodrome (now Westmount subdivision) and a Michelin tire from the spacecraft Columbia, signed by Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield.

My son’s favourite experience was the mock-up of a British Aerospace 146 cockpit, formerly used for crew training. Although it was never a fully functioning simulator, it was the exact size of a real cockpit, and had all the right dials and instruments in place, including the control column and throttles.

The gift shop at the museum is a unique experience itself. Many enthusiasts buy vintage models to collect, not to build. - Helen Earley
The gift shop at the museum is a unique experience itself. Many enthusiasts buy vintage models to collect, not to build. – Helen Earley

We climbed into the comfortable pilot seats – he as the captain, me as the first officer – and pretended to fly. I tried to remember the lingo from the days when I was invited into the flight deck for landings: the “WHOOP, WHOOP” of the auto-pilot disengaging; the countdown to touchdown. My son was suitably impressed, and we took off again for a new destination.

Next, we followed a ramp leading to a second hangar and discovered that the Atlantic Canadian Aviation Museum is much bigger than it seems.

Amongst over a dozen civil and military aircraft and weaponry, including a genuine Second World War “doodlebug” cruise missile, I was impressed with the sheer glamour of the Lockheed Jetstar, a sleek 14-passenger business jet used to transport prime ministers, including Pierre Trudeau, across the country in the 1970s and 80s.

Inside the cabin, maroon-striped upholstery defined the pièce-de-résistance: a comfortable three-seater sofa, with round ashtrays built into the armrests.

Seven-year-old Michael Barker pretends to be a pilot at the controls of the BAE 146 at the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum. - Helen Earley
Seven-year-old Michael Barker pretends to be a pilot at the controls of the BAE 146 at the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum. – Helen Earley

More than just a regular gift shop

Our final destination was the gift shop, which had a collection of model aircraft that would rival any hobby shop. Some of the aircraft models were acquired through the estates of aviation enthusiasts, making them ultra-collectible, Ryan told us, with many enthusiasts buying vintage models to collect, not to build. There were also some quirky finds, such as a set of Canadian Pacific Air dishes.

My son bought a simple model plane, plus a handful of small foam gliders, which brought us more fun at home as we launched them from the deck into the backyard. At 49 cents each, these tiny gliders represented the deal of the day, apart from the museum admission itself, which is free in order to encourage families to visit. A donation of eight dollars per adult is suggested, and can be paid in cash, discreetly slipped into a donation box, or by credit or debit card at the gift shop.

Next time you pass the brightly painted CF-101 Voodoo poking out from behind the bushes at the side of the 102 Highway, consider touching down at The Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum – arguably Halifax’s most driven-by attraction, and a veritable hidden gem.

Many people drive by the iconic CF 101 Voodoo on Highway 102 near the Halifax airport without realizing the museum is there, says Helen Earley, pictured with her son, seven-year-old Michael Barker.  - Helen Earley
Many people drive by the iconic CF 101 Voodoo on Highway 102 near the Halifax airport without realizing the museum is there, says Helen Earley, pictured with her son, seven-year-old Michael Barker. – Helen Earley

Other Places to Explore Aviation History in Nova Scotia

Shearwater Aviation Museum, Shearwater

  • Phone: (902) 720-1083

Greenwood Military Aviation Museum, Kingston

  • Phone: (902) 765 1494 Ext 5955

Alexander Graham Bell Museum and National Historic Site, Baddeck

  • Phone: (902) 295-2069
There are also affordable souvenirs, like this 49-cent model airplane. - Helen Earley
There are also affordable souvenirs, like this 49-cent model airplane. – Helen Earley
Visitors can also discover more about the history of space travel at the museum, which includes a Michelin tire from the spacecraft Columbia, signed by Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield. - Helen Earley
Visitors can also discover more about the history of space travel at the museum, which includes a Michelin tire from the spacecraft Columbia, signed by Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield. – Helen Earley

Helen Earley is a Halifax-based travel writer and author of a new travel guide, 25 Family Adventures in Nova Scotia. She served as cabin crew for British Airways from 1996-2007.

Flair Airlines touches down in Charlottetown, third new flight in a week

From CBC News – link to source story

‘We’re just happy to be talking about growth and recovery and people travelling for a change’

Wayne Thibodeau · CBC News · Posted: Aug 02, 2021

Flair Airlines touched down at the Charlottetown Airport for the first time Monday, with a new non-stop service to Toronto’s Pearson Airport. (Charlottetown Airport Authority)

Flair Airlines touched down at the Charlottetown Airport for the first time Monday, with a new non-stop service to Toronto’s Pearson Airport.

This is the third new flight, and the second new airline, for the Island’s airport in less than a week. 

WestJet, which has been operating in the capital city airport for 15 years, launched its first direct flight from Calgary to Charlottetown and Newfoundland-based PAL Airlines introduced a brand new service between Halifax and Charlottetown. 

Stephen Jones, president and CEO of Flair Airlines, was on the tarmac to welcome his airline’s first arrival on Prince Edward Island. 

Flair had hoped to launch its service to P.E.I. sooner but the pandemic put a hold on its expansion plans. 

“It’s been brutal for the whole industry and Flair is no exception, but we’re growing our way out of it,” said Jones.

“We’re really seeing a rebound in traffic at the moment.”

P.E.I. Tourism Minister Matthew Mackay, left, Charlottetown Airport CEO Doug Newson, and Stephen Jones, president and CEO of Flair Airlines, were on the tarmac to welcome Flair’s flight into Prince Edward Island on Monday. (Wayne Thibodeau/CBC)

Not only was it a new airline, but a brand new Boeing aircraft that landed on Monday. 

There were 174 passengers on the first flight into Charlottetown 

Doug Newson, CEO of the Charlottetown Airport, said the addition of Flair is another sign of recovery for the airline industry and for the Island’s beleaguered tourism industry.

Newson said he’s not surprised by the speed of the airline industry’s rebound.  

“We always knew … that there’s a lot of pent-up demand, a lot of visitors here that are coming to see their family and friends that haven’t been home for a couple of years in a lot of cases,” said Newson. “So we knew as soon as P.E.I. opened up for visitors outside of Atlantic Canada the airlines would come back and the flights would be busy.”    

‘It’s nowhere close to what we’re used to’

Newson said he believes next year could be a banner year for the airport and tourism on the Island. 

The first passengers get off a Flair Airlines flight at Charlottetown Airport on Monday. Flair will fly Toronto to Charlottetown Mondays and Fridays and Charlottetown to Toronto Mondays and Fridays. (Wayne Thibodeau/CBC)

“We’re just happy to be talking about growth and recovery and people travelling for a change,” said Newson.   

P.E.I. Tourism Minister Matthew Mackay, who was also on hand for the initial Flair Airlines flight, said the new flights are huge for the tourism industry, which was devastated by the pandemic. He said the industry is slowly starting to recover.  

“It’s nowhere close to what we’re used to,” said MacKay, noting the province usually sees 1.6 million visitors annually. 

“We’re not there, but we’re certainly in good position here, we’ve got a lot of traffic, a lot of visitors coming in, a lot of accommodations are full and we’re really hoping for a big fall season as well.”    

Flair will fly Toronto to Charlottetown Mondays and Fridays and Charlottetown to Toronto Mondays and Fridays. 

Even with the new airlines, airport officials say the airport is only operating at about half of its summer capacity.  

‘We will fly where the demand is’

Jones said he expects his airline, which bills itself as Canada’s only independent low-fare airline, will have a long history in P.E.I.

“I hope it’s going to be year-round,” said Jones. 

“I mean we will fly where the demand is so we will grow our network to where people want to fly.” 

Government of Canada announces easing of border measures for fully vaccinated travellers

From: Public Health Agency of Canada

News release

International flights carrying passengers will be permitted to land at five additional Canadian airports

July 19, 2021 | Ottawa | Public Health Agency of Canada

The Government of Canada is prioritizing the health and safety of everyone in Canada by taking a risk-based and measured approach to re-opening our borders. Thanks to the hard work of Canadians, rising vaccination rates and declining COVID-19 cases, the Government of Canada is able to move forward with adjusted border measures.

On September 7, 2021, provided that the domestic epidemiologic situation remains favourable, the Government intends to open Canada’s borders to any fully vaccinated travellers who have completed the full course of vaccination with a Government of Canada-accepted vaccine at least 14 days prior to entering Canada and who meet specific entry requirements.

As a first step, starting August 9, 2021, Canada plans to begin allowing entry to American citizens and permanent residents, who are currently residing in the United States, and have been fully vaccinated at least 14 days prior to entering Canada for non-essential travel. This preliminary step allows for the Government of Canada to fully operationalize the adjusted border measures ahead of September 7, 2021, and recognizes the many close ties between Canadians and Americans.

Subject to limited exceptions, all travellers must use ArriveCAN (app or web portal) to submit their travel information. If they are eligible to enter Canada and meet specific criteria, fully vaccinated travellers will not have to quarantine upon arrival in Canada.

To further support these new measures, Transport Canada is expanding the scope of the existing Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) that currently directs scheduled international commercial passenger flights into four Canadian Airports: Montréal-Trudeau International Airport, Toronto Pearson International Airport, Calgary International Airport, and Vancouver International Airport.

Effective August 9, 2021, international flights carrying passengers will be permitted to land at the following five additional Canadian airports:

  • Halifax Stanfield International Airport;
  • Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport;
  • Ottawa Macdonald–Cartier International Airport;
  • Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport; and
  • Edmonton International Airport.

These airports, in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and Transport Canada, are working to implement the measures necessary to safely welcome international passengers as soon as possible after August 9, as conditions dictate.

All travellers, regardless of vaccination status, will still require a pre-entry COVID-19 molecular test result. However effective August 9, 2021, the Government of Canada is adjusting its post-arrival testing strategy for fully vaccinated travellers. Using a new border testing surveillance program at airports and land border crossings, fully vaccinated travellers will not need a post-arrival test unless they have been randomly selected to complete a Day 1 COVID-19 molecular test. There are no changes to the mandatory testing requirements for unvaccinated travellers.

This strategy allows the Government of Canada to continue monitoring variants of concern in Canada and vaccine effectiveness. Using these layers of protection, the Government of Canada can monitor the COVID-19 situation in Canada, respond quickly to threats, and guide decisions on restricting international travel.

Finally, with the advent of increased vaccination rates in Canada, declining COVID-19 cases and reduced pressure on health care capacity, the three-night government authorized hotel stay requirement will be eliminated for all travellers arriving by air as of 12:01 A.M. EDT on August 9. Fully vaccinated travellers who meet the requirements will be exempt from quarantine; however, all travellers must still provide a quarantine plan and be prepared to quarantine, in case it is determined at the border that they do not meet the necessary requirements.

While Canada continues to trend in the right direction, the epidemiological situation and vaccination coverage is not the same around the world. The Government of Canada continues to advise Canadians to avoid non-essential travel outside of Canada – international travel increases your risk of exposure to COVID-19 and its variants, as well as of spreading it to others. Border measures also remain subject to change as the epidemiological situation evolves. As Canada looks to welcome fully vaccinated travellers from the U.S., the federal government will continue to monitor the situation and provide updated travel advice to Canadians.

Quotes

“Canadians’ safety and security always come first. With rising vaccination rates and fewer cases in Canada, we can begin to safely ease border measures. A gradual approach to reopening will allow our health authorities to monitor the COVID-19 situation here and abroad. Canadians have worked hard and sacrificed for each other, and because of that work, we can take these next steps safely.”

The Honourable Patty Hajdu
Minister of Health

“The health and safety of Canadians remains our top priority. Using a risk-based and measured approach to easing border measures will allow for non-essential international travellers who meet vaccination and other requirements to enter Canada. Working collaboratively with provinces, territories, Indigenous partners, and others to encourage Canadians to get vaccinated and follow public health advice is enabling us to begin welcoming more travellers back to Canada. Our government will continue to work with Canadian and international partners to ensure the border reopening is done in a safe and responsible way.”

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

“The Government of Canada recognizes that people have been anxiously awaiting a re-opening of the border to the world. We have been fully engaged with our American counterparts given the deep economic and family ties between our two countries. Today’s announcement is another big step in our approach to easing border measures which is guided by facts, scientific evidence and the advice of our public health experts.”

The Honourable Bill Blair
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

“Thanks to the extraordinary commitment of Canadians to getting vaccinated and following public health advice, we are seeing improvement in the public health situation in Canada. As a result, today we announced new steps in our re-opening approach, including that international flights carrying passengers will be allowed to land at five more Canadian airports.”

The Honourable Omar Alghabra
Minister of Transport Canada

“Thanks to the incredible progress that Canadians have made in our fight against the pandemic, we are now able to take the next step in Canada’s gradual reopening of the border. We look forward to welcoming fully vaccinated Americans shortly, followed by travellers from the rest of the world in early September. Not only will this make a big difference for Canada’s travel and tourism industry and all those whose jobs depend on it, it will also make it easier for those with a Confirmation of Permanent Residence letter to come to Canada and play a role in our recovery from the pandemic.”

The Honourable Marco Mendicino
Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

“The easing of Canada’s border measures is welcome news for tourism businesses across the country, the thousands of Canadians employed by the sector and the communities who rely on it. It has been a challenging year as we balance the need to protect both the health of Canadians and our economy but tourism businesses have demonstrated incredible resilience. Our government has been proud to be by their side since the beginning of this crisis and we will continue to be there as they prepare to begin to welcome vaccinated travellers from around the world to our beautiful shores.”

The Honourable Melanie Joly
Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages

Quick Facts

  • To be eligible to enter Canada for discretionary travel on the basis of vaccination status, travellers must use the ArriveCAN app or web portal. Travellers must ensure that mandatory requirements are met prior to departing for Canada. In addition, some provinces and territories may have their own entry restrictions in place. Check and follow both the federal and any provincial or territorial restrictions and requirements before travelling.
  • In addition to receiving a full series of a vaccine authorized by the Government of Canada, fully vaccinated travellers must also: provide COVID-19-related information electronically through ArriveCAN (app or web portal) including proof of vaccination prior to arrival in Canada; meet the pre-entry testing requirements; be asymptomatic upon arrival; and have a paper or digital copy of their vaccination documentation in English or French (or certified translation) ready to show a government official on request as evidence.
  • A person who submits false information on vaccination status could be liable to a fine of up to $750,000 or six months imprisonment or both, under the Quarantine Act, or prosecution under the Criminal Code for forgery. Violating any quarantine or isolation instructions provided to travellers by a screening officer or quarantine officer when entering Canada is also an offence under the Quarantine Act and could lead to a $5,000 fine for each day of non-compliance or for each offence committed, or more serious penalties, including six months in prison and/or $750,000 in fines. Non-compliant air travellers may also be subject to fines of up to $5,000 for each offence committed under the Aeronautics Act.
  • Based on public health advice, Transport Canada has extended the Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) that restricts all direct commercial and private passenger flights to Canada from India for an additional 30 days (i.e. until August 21, 2021, at 23:59 EDT). All direct commercial and private passenger flights to Canada from India are subject to the NOTAM. Cargo-only operations, medical transfers or military flights are not included. Transport Canada has also extended the requirement related to third-country pre-departure COVID-19 tests for travellers to Canada from India via an indirect route. This means that passengers who depart India to Canada via an indirect route will continue to be required to obtain a COVID-19 pre-departure test from a third country other than India before continuing their journey to Canada.

Related Products

Associated Links

Porter Airlines expanding service across North America by acquiring up to 80 Embraer E195-E2s

TORONTO, July 12, 2021 /CNW/ – Porter Airlines is extending its award-winning service to destinations throughout North America with the introduction of up to 80 state-of-the-art, fuel-efficient Embraer E195-E2 aircraft into its fleet. The planes have transcontinental range and will enter into service with Porter starting in the second half of 2022.

Porter is Embraer’s North American launch customer for the E2. The total aircraft order is valued at up to USD $5.82 billion at current list prices, with 30 firm commitments and 50 purchase right options. The aircraft are being acquired by Porter Aircraft Leasing Corp., a sister company of Porter Airlines. This investment enhances competition, elevates passenger service levels and creates as many as 6,000 new jobs based on 80 aircraft deliveries.

Porter Airlines is extending its award-winning service to destinations throughout North America with the introduction of up to 80 state-of-the-art, fuel-efficient Embraer E195-E2 aircraft into its fleet. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines is extending its award-winning service to destinations throughout North America with the introduction of up to 80 state-of-the-art, fuel-efficient Embraer E195-E2 aircraft into its fleet. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
The E195-E2’s range allows for the creation of a continental route network. Potential markets reach coast to coast in Canada and the United States, including U.S. sun destinations, plus Mexico and the Caribbean. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
The E195-E2’s range allows for the creation of a continental route network. Potential markets reach coast to coast in Canada and the United States, including U.S. sun destinations, plus Mexico and the Caribbean. (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)

The ability to convert purchase rights to smaller E190-E2s is included in the agreement. This provides opportunities to introduce non-stop service in markets where connecting flights are often the only option today. It also enables higher-frequency service for routes with greater demand.

Porter intends to operate the E2s to popular destinations from Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax and Toronto Pearson International Airport. The introduction of specific routes will be determined in advance of aircraft deliveries.

“We are bringing Porter’s distinct style of service to dozens of new North American cities,” said Michael Deluce, president and CEO, Porter Airlines. “We believe that now is the right time to make this investment as the pandemic resets the aviation landscape. Adding a diverse selection of popular business and leisure destinations to our network means that we are better positioned to serve the needs of many more passengers.”

While establishing service at Pearson Airport for the first time, flights from Porter’s existing hub at downtown Toronto’s Billy Bishop Airport remain core to its business and will continue with high-frequency regional service on turboprop aircraft. Service is confirmed to restart at Billy Bishop on Sept. 8, following a temporary shutdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated travel restrictions. The airport is essential to the airline’s immediate plans for re-establishing flights and developing future routes. The E2s will not operate at this airport.

“Our commitment to Billy Bishop Airport is not changing,” said Robert Deluce, founder and executive chairman, Porter Airlines. “Our corporate headquarters at Billy Bishop is being maintained and we will continue serving the same network of regional markets from downtown Toronto. We are moving beyond this existing footprint to welcome more travellers across North America, with an emphasis on providing the sophisticated service that only Porter delivers.”

Porter set a new standard for regional flying when it took off in 2006. Its Flying Refined brand promise emphasizes bringing dignity and ease to travel, with an elevated, high-value experience. Complimentary beer and wine served in glassware, and premium snacks for all passengers are recognizable hallmarks of every flight. The airline is planning to enhance its award-winning customer experience and transform travel again in the wider North American market.

The E195-E2’s range allows for the creation of a continental route network. Potential markets reach coast to coast in Canada and the United States, including U.S. sun destinations, plus Mexico and the Caribbean. A destination map is available at www.flyporter.com, with initial routes to be announced in 2022.

The E195-E2 accommodates between 120 and 146 passengers. The interior complements Porter’s traditional service offering, with a passenger-focused design emphasizing space and comfort. Features include aisle or window seating for every passenger, with no middle seats, plus large windows and overhead bins, and cabin mood lighting. Porter is currently finalizing its preferred configuration and additional passenger experience details, such as in-flight entertainment and onboard service.

“With this order for up to 80 of our largest aircraft, the E2 is making a stunning North American debut,” said Arjan Meijer, president and CEO, Embraer Commercial Aviation. As the quietest and most fuel-efficient aircraft in the segment, the E195-E2 also delivers excellent economic performance that shines through.”

The E2 is the most environmentally-friendly single-aisle aircraft family, measured by sound and CO2 emissions. The E195-E2 is certified to the strictest international standard for aircraft noise, at 65% quieter than previous generation types. Carbon emissions are nearly 10% lower per trip, with up to 25% less CO2 emissions per seat. Combined with Porter’s existing De Havilland Dash 8-400s, the airline will have one of the world’s most environmentally sustainable commercial aircraft fleets.

Canada-based aerospace companies contribute greater than 37% of the E2’s main systems. The engines are produced by Pratt & Whitney Canada in Quebec, with revolutionary geared-turbofan technology being the most significant component of the aircraft’s incredible fuel efficiency and minimal sound profile. Additionally, Ontario-based Thales produces select avionics and Quebec-based Alta Precision the main landing gear. Porter’s purchase supports skilled jobs and ongoing innovation within this important economic sector.

“The support of our board of directors and shareholders was crucial in deciding to invest in Porter’s future,” said Don Carty, chairman of the board, Porter Airlines. “We have investors, partners, customers and team members who have been with us from day one, while others joined at different points along the way. It’s time for us to collectively build on the exceptional global reputation that we’ve built for Porter and continue our journey.”

Funds for the aircraft purchase are being raised privately from shareholders, as well as through aircraft sale-leaseback agreements.

An overview of Porter’s growth plan, including E195-E2 features, is available on its website.

About Porter Airlines

Porter Airlines provides a warm and effortless approach to hospitality, restoring glamour and refinement to air travel. Porter is an Official 4 Star Airline® in the World Airline Star Rating®.

The airline currently offers flights to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Fredericton, Saint John, Moncton, Halifax, St. John’s, Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Timmins, Windsor, New York (Newark), Chicago (Midway), Boston and Washington (Dulles), and has seasonal flights to Mt. Tremblant, Que., Muskoka, Ont., Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Stephenville, N.L.

Visit www.flyporter.com

Flair Airlines Continues Impressive Growth With Flights to the U.S, Bringing Ultra-Low Fares to Sun Destinations

Canada’s only true ULCC announces U.S service to 6 new sun destinations, bringing Canadians the lowest fares to their favorite places

EDMONTON, Alberta, July 08, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Flair Airlines, Canada’s only true ultra low-cost carrier (ULCC), continues to change the face of the Canadian aviation market with unprecedented growth as it announces non-stop, low fare flights between 8 Canadian cities and 6 U.S destinations: Fort Lauderdale, Orlando-Sanford, Phoenix-Mesa, Hollywood-Burbank, Palm Springs and Las Vegas.

“We want Canadians to hear us loud and clear, you don’t have to rack up debt or save for months to enjoy travel this winter,” says Stephen Jones, President and CEO, Flair Airlines. “For years, Canadians have been over-paying for air travel to domestic and U.S destinations. Flair is here to ensure that Canadians are no longer taken advantage of and receive low prices for even better service. The fares to our new destinations ensure Canadians can easily enjoy travel this winter and spend some much-deserved time away exploring sunny new places.”

Halifax, Montreal, Kitchener-Waterloo, Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa and Abbotsford will receive service to a variety of the U.S cities starting this October. The ultra-low fares will start between $79 to $109 CAD one-way. All routes and schedule details can be viewed at https://www.flyflair.com.

The new service to the six U.S cities are among several new destinations Flair is adding to its network as the airline rapidly grows to serve 26 destinations in Canada and the U.S. With an ambitious goal to grow to 50 aircraft in 5 years, Flair is rapidly expanding as it disrupts the market and brings affordable air travel to Canadians.

Comments from our airport partners

Vancouver International Airport (YVR)

“We are pleased to see Flair adding new routes out of YVR to exciting vacation destinations such as Burbank (California), Palm Springs (PSP), Mesa (Arizona) and Las Vegas (Nevada). As we see restrictions ease and passenger traffic increase these new routes will allow for more travel options once we are able to explore freely again. We commend Canada’s airlines for continuing to serve Canadians through the last year and a half and we are excited to see Flair expand their offer to provide unique travel experiences. YVR is ready to welcome all passengers back to the airport and will ensure the passenger journey through the airport is an effortless and safe one,” said Russell Atkinson, Director, Air Service Development – Strategy

Calgary Airport Authority (YYC)

“Congratulations to Flair on their new routes. We’re excited for our guests to get back up in the air again flying to the warm destinations of Phoenix, Burbank and Las Vegas,” said Rob Palmer, Vice-President, Commercial, Strategy, and Chief Financial Officer, The Calgary Airport Authority. “We’re ready to welcome guests back safely and we look forward to the added sunny winter options for Calgarians.”

Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (YUL)

“We are pleased to see that Flair has decided to increase its presence in Canada by enhancing its air service from YUL Montréal-Trudeau International Airport. Starting this fall, passengers will be able to benefit from a wide-range of options to popular sun destinations. This is good news for travellers – who we look forward to welcoming back to YUL – and it is another step in the recover of our industry and aviation activities,” said Stéphane Lapierre Vice President, Airport Operations and Air Services Development, ADM Aéroports de Montreal.

Region of Waterloo International Airport (YKF)

“The increase in destinations will be an asset for the community,” commented Regional Chair Karen Redman. “We are pleased with Flair Airlines’ commitment to providing affordable travel and connectivity across Canada, as well as the opportunities this provides for an economic recovery in terms of business and tourism in the Region of Waterloo.”

Ottawa International Airport Authority (YOW)

“Flair’s YOW service expansion is a testament to their early success at our airport. As Canada’s Capital Region continues to rebuild from the devastating effects of COVID-19, not only are the residents of Ottawa-Gatineau ready to travel, we know that our destination is safe and attractive for visitors as well,” said Mark Laroche, President & CEO, Ottawa International Airport Authority.

Abbotsford International Airport (YXX)

“A new Flair Airlines route from Abbotsford International Airport to McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas will help serve our growing community and our region,” said Mayor of Abbotsford Henry Braun. “We know that as COVID-19 restrictions lift, the Abbotsford International Airport and its service providers will continue to be an economic driver for our community and the region, offering convenient and low cost flight options.”

Halifax International Airport Authority (YHZ)

“We are pleased with Flair’s plan to expand its upcoming winter season services with a new route between Halifax Stanfield and Orlando Sanford, Florida,” said Joyce Carter, President & CEO, Halifax International Airport Authority. “As more of our community members are making travel plans, we’re excited by this new connection to the Sunshine State and look forward to offering direct U.S. and International air services again when the federal government restrictions on international flights to Canada are lifted.”

McCarran International Airport – Las Vegas (LAS)

“These new routes from Flair Airlines will significantly increase the opportunity for Canadians to experience Las Vegas,” said Chris Jones, McCarran International Airport Chief Marketing Officer. “Historically, Las Vegas has been a top destination for travelers from across Canada and we look forward to welcoming even more visitors to this world-class destination.”

Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB)

“We are excited that the recent completion of our new terminal modernization and expansion has accelerated our air service recruitment initiatives. We thank Flair Airlines for choosing SFB,” said Tom Green, Sanford Airport Authority Board Chairman.

“SFB Airport a safe, efficient, and cost effective alternative to MCO. Flair Air recognized these benefits and we appreciate their decision. We believe Canada will be a strong market through SFB Airport. These flights to several cities will make it attractive to Canadian visitors and the local residents wanting to experience all the great things Canada has to offer,” said Tom Nolan, A.A.E, President & CEO.

Palm Springs International Airport (PSP)

“Canadians have long appreciated our year-round sunshine, world-class special events and relaxed desert lifestyle,” said Mayor Christy Holstege. “We thank Flair Airlines for adding Palm Springs International Airport to their network and we look forward to a long relationship.”

About Flair Airlines

Flair Airlines is Canada’s only independent Ultra Low-Cost Carrier (ULCC) and is on a mission to liberate the lives of Canadians by providing affordable air travel that connects them to the people and experiences they love. With an expanding fleet of Boeing 737 aircraft, Flair is growing to serve 26 cities across Canada and the U.S. For more information, please visit http://www.flyflair.com

Flair Airlines US Destinations
October 31, 2021 – March 26, 2022

Fort Lauderdale (FLL)

  • Toronto (YYZ)
  • Kitchener-Waterloo (YKF)
  • Ottawa (YOW)
  • Montreal (YUL)

Orlando-Sanford (SFB)

  • Toronto (YYZ)
  • Kitchener-Waterloo (YKF)
  • Ottawa (YOW)
  • Montreal (YUL)
  • Halifax (YHZ)

Las Vegas (LAS)

  • Toronto (YYZ)
  • Ottawa (YOW)
  • Vancouver (YVR)
  • Abbotsford (YXX)
  • Calgary (YYC)

Phoenix-Mesa (AZA)

  • Toronto (YYZ)
  • Vancouver (YVR)
  • Calgary (YYC)

Hollywood Burbank (BUR)

  • Toronto (YYZ)
  • Vancouver (YVR)
  • Calgary (YYC)

Palm Springs (PSP)

  • Vancouver (YVR)

Porter Airlines confirms restart of service to select Canadian destinations beginning Sept. 8

U.S. flights start on Sept. 17

TORONTO, July 5, 2021 /CNW/ – Porter Airlines is officially returning to the skies on Sept. 8, nearly 18 months after suspending flights due to COVID-19 public health and travel restrictions.

The flight schedule is returning in phases, with the initial group of Canadian destinations being Halifax, Moncton, Montreal, Ottawa, Quebec City, St. John’s, NL, Thunder Bay and Toronto. U.S. destinations in Boston, Chicago, New York and Washington follow on Sept. 17.

U.S. flights start on September 17 (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
U.S. flights start on September 17 (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines confirms restart of service to select Canadian destinations beginning Sept. 8 (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)
Porter Airlines confirms restart of service to select Canadian destinations beginning Sept. 8 (CNW Group/Porter Airlines)

“This is the moment our team members, passengers and the communities we serve have been waiting for,” said Michael Deluce, president and CEO, Porter Airlines. “The pandemic has progressed to the point that we can now begin restoring service across our network, focused around our main base at Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. Being grounded for more than a year has been incredibly difficult for everyone involved. In true Porter fashion, our team members have displayed remarkable levels of commitment, engagement and optimism over this uncertain period of time, despite the vast majority being unable to work. While deciding to suspend our service was the most difficult business decision we’ve made, announcing a restart of flights is the first step in a recovery process that includes recalling hundreds of team members and welcoming back passengers. We are looking forward to once again delivering Porter’s unique style of service.”

Approximately 500 team members will be recalled to active status as the first phase of flights are introduced. More staff will be added in subsequent months as flights and destinations return to the schedule.

The initial flight schedule is as follows:

Canadian Routes*Peak daily roundtripsService start date
Ottawa – Toronto6 flightsSept. 8
Montreal – Toronto6 flightsSept. 8
Thunder Bay – Toronto3 flightsSept. 8
Ottawa – Halifax2 flightsSept. 13
Montreal – Halifax1 flightSept. 13
Quebec City – Toronto1 flightSept. 13
Halifax – St. John’s1 flightSept. 17
Moncton – Ottawa1 flightSept. 17
U.S. Routes*
New York (Newark) – Toronto6 fightsSept. 17
Boston – Toronto3 flightsSept. 17
Chicago (Midway) – Toronto2 flightsSept. 17
Washington (Dulles) – Toronto1 flightSept. 17
* All Toronto routes operate at Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. Schedules vary by day of week.

Flights to other year-round destinations normally operated by Porter are currently available for booking and set to resume as of Oct. 6. Service is returning based on anticipated passenger demand, with frequency and markets increasing over time.

To provide flexibility and give travellers peace of mind when purchasing for future travel, Porter is making all fares purchased by July 20, for travel through December 15, 2021, fully refundable, with no fees. This also applies to Porter Escapes vacation packages.

In preparation for its resumption of service, Porter is introducing a comprehensive program to protect the health of its passengers and team members. Healthy Flights strengthens existing standards focusing on high levels of sanitization.

“Our safety team developed Healthy Flights as more than a checklist of rules and procedures,” said Deluce. “They carefully considered how to provide a safe experience for our passengers and team members, while being true to our distinct brand and approach to service.”

Detailed information about Healthy Flights is available online.

About Porter Airlines
Porter Airlines has revolutionized short-haul flying with a warm and effortless approach to hospitality, restoring glamour and refinement to air travel. Porter is an Official 4 Star Airline®in the World Airline Star Rating®.

The airline currently offers flights to Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, Fredericton, Saint John, Moncton, Halifax, St. John’s, Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, Timmins, Windsor, New York (Newark), Chicago (Midway), Boston and Washington (Dulles), and has seasonal flights to Mt. Tremblant, Que., Muskoka, Ont., Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Stephenville, N.L. Visit www.flyporter.com or follow @porterairlines on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

2018 Halifax runway overrun highlights TSB Watchlist issues

Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 29 June 2021 – In its investigation report (A18A0085) released today, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) identified multiple contributing factors that led to a 2018 runway overrun.

On 7 November 2018, a Sky Lease Cargo Boeing 747-412F aircraft was conducting a flight from Chicago/O’Hare International Airport (KORD), Illinois, U.S., to Halifax/Stanfield International Airport (CYHZ), Nova Scotia, with three crew members and one passenger on board. The aircraft touched down firmly on Runway 14 at approximately 5:06 Atlantic Standard Time, during the hours of darkness, and subsequently overran the runway. It came to rest 270 m (885 feet) past the end of the runway. Aircraft rescue and firefighting personnel responded. All three crew members received minor injuries and were taken to the hospital. The passenger, a deadheading pilot, was not injured.

The investigation determined that, as part of the pre-departure planning at KORD, the crew and flight dispatch reviewed the Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) for the intended flight. However, the ineffective presentation style and sequence of the NOTAMs led them to interpret that Runway 23 was not available for landing at CYHZ. Therefore, the crew planned to land on Runway 14.

During the approach to this shorter runway, new information regarding a change of active runway was not communicated by air traffic control directly to the crew, although broadcasted through an automated information system. As a result, the crew continued to believe that the approach and landing on Runway 14 was the only option available. Less than 90 seconds from the threshold, the crew realized that there was a tailwind component; however, they did not recalculate the performance data to confirm that the landing distance available was still acceptable, likely because of the limited amount of time available before landing. The unexpected tailwind resulted in a greater landing distance required, but this distance did not exceed the length of the runway.

Upon landing, a series of events prevented the aircraft from decelerating as expected and caused the aircraft to drift to the right of the runway. The pilot monitoring’s attention was focused on the lateral drift and, as a result, the required callouts regarding the position of the deceleration devices were not made.

Although manual brake application began 8 seconds after touchdown, maximum braking effort did not occur until 15 seconds later, when the aircraft was 800 feet from the end of the runway. From this position, it was not possible for the aircraft to stop on the runway and the aircraft departed the end of the runway and came to a stop 270 m (885 feet) past the end.

During the overrun, the aircraft crossed a significant drop past the end of the runway and was damaged beyond repair. While this uneven terrain was beyond the 150 m (492 feet) runway end safety area (RESA) proposed by Transport Canada, it was within the recommended International Civil Aviation Organization RESA of 300 m (984 feet). In 2007, the TSB issued Recommendation A07-06 stating that the Department of Transport require all Code 4 (1800 m or longer) runways to have a 300 m RESA or a means of stopping aircraft that provides an equivalent level of safety. The issue of Runway overruns has been on the TSB’s Watchlist since 2010.

The investigation included a thorough fatigue analysis, which identified the presence of 2 fatigue risk factors that would have degraded the crew’s performance during the approach and landing: the timing of the flight and insufficient restorative sleep in the 24-hour period leading up to the occurrence. Fatigue management is also a TSB 2020 Watchlist item.

See the investigation page for more information.


The TSB is an independent agency that investigates air, marine, pipeline, and rail transportation occurrences. Its sole aim is the advancement of transportation safety. It is not the function of the Board to assign fault or determine civil or criminal liability.